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ORGANIZATIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN THE LIGHT OF LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS AND EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS Assoc.Prof.Dr. Osman TİTREK Educational Administration / Life.

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Presentation on theme: "ORGANIZATIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN THE LIGHT OF LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS AND EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS Assoc.Prof.Dr. Osman TİTREK Educational Administration / Life."— Presentation transcript:

1 ORGANIZATIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN THE LIGHT OF LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS AND EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS Assoc.Prof.Dr. Osman TİTREK Educational Administration / Life Long Learning-LLP

2 ORGANIZATIONAL INTELLIGENCE One of the most important one of human brain capitals is intelligence, and effective organizations are the ones actuating brain capital in the best way.

3 Organizational intelligence is the capacity of an organization to create knowledge and use it to strategically adapt to its environment or marketplace. It is similar to I.Q., but framed at an organizational level (Halal, 1997).

4 The term "organizational intelligence" refers to the ability or capability of an organization to analyze data and translate it into usable information. It includes the organization's ability gathering data, researching events and behaviors, and an organization's capability for sharing information amongst stakeholders.

5 5 Cognitive Subsystems Organizational intelligence is a function of five cognitive subsystems (Halal, 2006): organizational structure, culture, stakeholder relationship, knowledge management and strategic processes

6 Albrecht (2009) explains organizational intelligence as the collective sum of individual intelligences and he claims seven dimensions.

7 1. Strategic Vision: It refers to the capacity to create evolve, and express the purpose of the enterprise and not to any particular vision, strategy, or mission concept in and of itself. The OIQ dimension of strategic vision presupposes that the leaders can articulate and evolve a success concept, and that they can reinvent it when and as necessary.

8 Every enterprise needs a theory — a concept, an organizing principle, a definition of the destiny it seeks to fulfill. Its leaders must ask and answer questions like: Who are we? Why do we exist? What is the primary value proposition that lies at the core of our existence? Why should the world accept, appreciate, and reward us for what we do? Note that strategic vision refers to the capacity to create, evolve, and express the purpose of the enterprise and not to any particular vision, strategy, or mission concept in and of itself.

9 2. Shared Fate: It means to know what the mission is, to have a sense of common purpose, and to understand individual parts in the algebra of its success. This sense that "We're all in the same boat"creates a powerful sense of community.

10 When all or most of the people involved in the enterprise, including associated stakeholders like key suppliers and business partners, and in some cases even the families of its members, know what the mission is, have a sense of common purpose, and understand their individual parts in the algebra of its success, they can act synergistically to achieve the vision. This sense that "We're all in the same boat" creates a powerful sense of community and esprit de corps.

11 3. Appetite for Change *In smart organization, change represents challenge, opportunity for new and exciting experiences, and a chance to tackle something new. *People in these environments see the need to reinvent the business model as a welcome and stimulating challenge, and a chance to learn new ways of succeeding.

12 Some organizational cultures, usually led by their executive teams, have become so firmly set in their ways of operating, thinking, and reacting to the environment that change represents a form of psychological discomfort or even distress. In others, change represents challenge, opportunity for new and exciting experiences, and a chance to tackle something new. People in these environments see the need to reinvent the business model as a welcome and stimulating challenge, and a chance to learn new ways of succeeding. The appetite for change needs to be big enough to accommodate the kinds of changes called for in the strategic vision.

13 4. Heart: Separate form the element of shared fate, the element of heart involves the willingness to give more than the standard. Organizational psychologists refer to discretionary effort as the amount of energy the members of the organization contribute over and above the level they have "contracted" to provide.

14 -Apart from the element of shared fate, the element of heart involves the willingness to give more than the standard. In an enterprise with little or no heart, staff members basically just do their jobs. In an organization with lots of heart, the leaders have somehow managed to earn a measure of discretionary effort, i.e. the willingness of the employees to contribute something more than expected, because they identify their success with the success of the enterprise and they want it to succeed.

15 5. Alignment and Congruence: Any group of more than a dozen people will start bumping into one another without a set of rules to operate by. They must organize themselves for the mission, divide up jobs and responsibilities, and work out a set of rules for interacting with one another and for dealing with the environment. -In the intelligent organization the system, broadly defined, all come together to enable the people to achieve the mission.

16 They must organize themselves for the mission, divide up jobs and responsibilities, and work out a set of rules for interacting with one another and for dealing with the environment. Any organizational structure you can imagine will impose limits and constraints as well as provide for cooperation. Sometimes the organization itself — the configuration of roles, goals, rules, and tools — changes from a solution to a problem in and of itself. When the design of the organization and its structures, systems, methods, processes, policies, rules and regulations, and reward systems push people in directions away from the achievement of the mission, a chiropractic adjustment is in order.

17 6. Knowledge Deployment: It deals with the capacity of the culture to make use of its valuable intellectual and informational resources. OIQ must include the free flow of knowledge throughout the culture and the careful balance between the conservation of sensitive information and the availability of information at key points of need. It must also include support and encouragement for new ideas, new inventions and an open-minded questioning of the status quo.

18 Almost every organization these days depends heavily on the acquired knowledge, know-how, judgment, wisdom, and shared sense of competency possessed by its people, as well as the wealth of operational information that flows through its structure every minute. The capacity to create, transform, organize, share, and apply knowledge is becoming an ever more critical aspect of competing in complex business environments. OI must include the free flow of knowledge throughout the culture, and the careful balance between the conservation of sensitive information and the availability of information at key points of need.

19 7. Performance pressure: In the intelligent organization, everyone owns the performance proposition, the sense of what has to be achieved and the belief in the validity of its aims. Leaders can promote and support a sense of performance pressure, but it has the most impact when it is accepted by all members of the organization as a self-imposed set of mutual expectations and an operational imperative for shared success

20 It's not enough for executives and managers to be preoccupied with the performance of the enterprise, i.e. its achievement of identified strategic objectives and tactical outcomes. In the intelligent organization, everyone owns the performance proposition, i.e. the sense of what has to be achieved and the belief in the validity of its aims. Leaders can promote and support a sense of performance pressure, but it has the more impact when it is accepted by all members of the organization as a self-imposed set of mutual expectations and an operational imperative for shared success.

21 Two -2- Components of OIQ There are usually two main components of organizational intelligence. The first one is knowledge management, which includes a number of strategies intended to gather and share information gained through research, data collection, and experience.knowledge management Examples of knowledge management techniques include the creation of best practice documents. Such documents are created by interviewing the most successful workers in a functional area, analyzing their processes and habits, and documenting those behaviors for use by all other workers in the same functional area.

22 The other main component of organizational intelligence is organizational learning. It refers to the ways in which an organization learns and also to the way in which organizations adapt based on what they learn.organizational learning

23 It is based on the belief that organizations that can objectively analyze data and find ways to incorporate changes in environment, government, resource availability, and consumer opinions and buying behaviors into their business plans are more successful than those who merely assemble data. Intelligent responses might include changing pricing strategies, expanding product offerings, or marketing in ways that reach consumers more effectively.

24 LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS The term 'Learning Organization' refers to an organization that constantly monitors its environment for changes, and learns from and adapts to these changes. Senge defines a 'learning organization' as a dynamical system that is in a state of continuous adaptation and improvement.

25 A learning organization is one that seeks to create its own future; that assumes learning is an ongoing and creative process for its members; and one that develops, adapts, and transforms itself in response to the needs and aspirations of people, both inside and outside itself (Navran Associates Newsletter 1993).

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28 5 Disciplines of Learning Organizations Peter Senge identified five (5) basic disciplines or components of a learning organization: 1) systems thinking 2) personal mastery 3) mental models 4) shared vision 5) team learning

29 Systems Thinking interdependency and change focus on whole not individual parts long-term goals vs. short-term benefits better appreciation of systems leads to more appropriate action

30 Personal Mastery organizations learn only through individuals who learn never “arrive”; in continual learning mode strive to clarify and deepen personal vision deeply aware of growth areas and tension between vision and reality

31 Mental Models deeply ingrained assumptions and generalizations honest and critical scrutiny of entrenched mental models transcend mental models in order for change to take place

32 Shared Vision A genuine vision leads to people wanting to excel and learn Leaders must translate personal visions into shared visions Unearthing shared ‘pictures of the future’ that foster genuine commitment rather than compliance Leaders learn the counter-productiveness of trying to dictate a vision, no matter how heartfelt.

33 Team Learning Team learning starts with ‘dialogue’= the capacity of members of a team to suspend assumptions and enter genuine ‘thinking together’ Allows the group to discover insights not attainable individually Shows group how to recognize the patterns of interaction that undermine learning

34 Characteristics of Learning Schools

35 How to Create a Culture Supporting a Learning Organization at School? Leaders of schools want their organizations to be flexible and responsive, able to change in accord with changing circumstances. The ideal organization is characterized as “self-renewing” or as a “learning organization”. The very first thing needed to create a learning organization is effective school and effective leadership, which is not based on a traditional hierarchy, but rather, is a mix of different people from all levels of the system, who lead in different ways (Senge 1996).

36 EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS Development of organizational intelligence requires senior leaders who are committed to the process of facilitating and growing it. An organization wil achieve its fullest potential only when teh entire workforce is heading in the same direction in regard to thinking and feeling, as these directly influence employee daily behaviors that synergistically define the organization’s ultimate success or failure.

37 An Effective School is a school that can, demonstrate the joint presence of quality and equity. It can demonstrate high overall levels of achievement and no gaps in the distribution of that achievement across major subsets of the student population.

38 Elements of Effective Schools Teaching and Learning Leadership Job-Embedded Professional Development Resources Safe and Effective Learning Environment Family and Community Engagement:

39 Essential Conditions for School Effectiveness Effective district systems for school support and intervention Effective school leadership Aligned curriculum Effective instruction Student assessment Principal's staffing authority Professional development and structures for collaboration Tiered instruction and adequate learning time Students' social, emotional, and health needs Family-school engagement Strategic use of resources and adequate budget authority

40 7 Key Characteristics Effective Schools According to the Institute of Public Policy Research (Brighouse and Tomlinson, 1991: 5), there are seven key characteristics of effective schools: 1.Leadership at all levels: strong, purposeful, adoption of more than one style. 2.Management and organisation: clear, simple, flatter structures. 3.Collective self-review: involving all staff and leading to developing new practices.

41 4.Staff development: systematic and involving collective and individual needs. 5.Environment / building / uplifting ethos: visually and aurally positive, promoting positive behaviour, high expectations. 6.Teaching and learning: creative debate amongst teachers and curricula and pedagogy. 7.Parental involvement: parents as partners in education.

42 Effective Leadership Leaders should have the knowledge of effective professional learning models. The following models can be used to help teachers analyze and to reflect on the impact of their practice and generate ideas for improvement. Action research is a strategy for learning more about the teaching and learning process. Teachers decide what questions are important to examine in order for them to gain insight into what is happening in their classroom.

43 Collaboratively examining students’ work enables teachers to understand how students think, permitting them to develop appropriate learning and teaching strategies and materials. Study groups engage in regular collaborative interactions around topics identified by the group. This provides opportunities to reflect on classroom practice and analyse student learning data.

44 Case discussions provide teams of teachers with the opportunity to reflect on teaching and learning by examining narrative stories or videotapes depicting school, classroom, teaching or learning situations or dilemmas. Peer observation promotes an open environment where public discussion of teaching is encouraged and supported. Lesson study helps teachers to prepare lesson plans and develop a deeper understanding of how students learn specific subject matter.

45 Key Dimensions of Effective Leadership 1- The structural dimension: formal versus distributed leadership 2- The process dimension: democratic versus top-down decision making 3- The practice dimension: what do effective leaders prioritise? 4- The personal dimension: qualities of effective leadership

46 Because organizational intelligence (OIQ) emphasizes to combine different parts in a whole effectively, it can be stated that both learning organizations and effective schools are indispensable elements of organizational intelligence. So it is important to develop organizational intelligence at schools in the lights of organizational learning and making schools effective.

47 QUESTION How can you organize your school culture and processes and structures as intelligently! For effectiveness? ………………………………………………………………..…….

48 Evaluation effectiveness level of your school 1- never 2- rarely 3 -sometimes 4- Usualy 5- Always Total score : 100

49 1.Is your school principals evertime smiling to you? 1.Is your school serving personal smiling to you?

50 2. Do you know your University vision and missions clearly? 3.Is your school managerial affairs being organized well? 4. Is your school have enough conferences seminars etc ? 5. Is your school organizing lots of social activities in free times? 6. If you have a problem in your school- you can solve it easily? Is your scholl personel and managers respect your open-minded and unusual questions ? 7. In your school all affairs organizaing easily and processes are simple? Or solving problems distrubting you ? School structures organized based on students need including disabled ?

51 7. If you have creative idea- do you have chance to practice in your school? 8. Does your school trying to do new and first applications or techniques in your country? 9.Does your school have best and new technologies and can you use it easily? 10. Does your school systems open the change? Or any prof’s create new system is using in your country or all the world? 11. Do your prof’s attending you researchs and social projects etc? And your rector supporting this type activities ?

52 12. Can you reach your profesors easily and are they emphatic? 13. When you are trying to have your rights prof.’s support to you or angry to you? 14. Do your prof.’s do the lesson on time and effectively? Are they ready with different materials ? 15. Do your prof’s processes ethicaly and fairly ? And your exam score also fair with your equals ? 16. One to one learning areas everytime is open in your university ? Do you have free computer and internet access for do the search for your academic studies ?

53 17. Does your university organizating some activities to develop society and can you attend these activities ? 18. In your school- can you feel we are in the same boat? 19. Are you going to school voluntarily? 20. Do you like your school?

54 Assoc.Prof.Dr. Osman TİTREK otitrek@sakarya.edu.tr


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