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Social Responsibility and Ethics in Marketing Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook 4 4 Part.

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Presentation on theme: "Social Responsibility and Ethics in Marketing Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook 4 4 Part."— Presentation transcript:

1 Social Responsibility and Ethics in Marketing Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook 4 4 Part One Marketing and Its Environment

2 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–24–2 Chapter Learning Objectives To understand the concept and dimensions of social responsibility To define and describe the importance of marketing ethics To become familiar with ways to improve ethical decisions in marketing To understand the role of social responsibility and ethics in improving marketing performance

3 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–34–3 Chapter Outline The Nature of Social Responsibility The Nature of Ethics Social Responsibility

4 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–44–4 The Nature of Social Responsibility The Dimensions of Social Responsibility –Marketing citizenship The adoption of a strategic focus for fulfilling the economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic social responsibilities expected by stakeholders –Stakeholders Constituents who have a “stake” or claim in some aspect of the company’s products, operations, markets, industry, and outcomes

5 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–54–5

6 4–64–6 The Pyramid of Corporate Social Responsibility FIGURE 4.1 Source: Archie B. Carroll, “The Pyramid of Corporate Social Responsibility: Toward the Moral Management of Organizational Stakeholders,” adaptation of Figure 3, p. 42. Reprinted from Business Horizons, July/Aug Copyright © 1991 by the Foundation for the School of Business at Indiana University. Used with permission.

7 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–74–7 The Nature of Social Responsibility (cont’d) The Dimensions of Social Responsibility –Marketing ethics Principles and standards that define acceptable marketing conduct as determined by various stakeholders –Cause-related marketing The practice of linking products to a particular cause on an ongoing or short-term basis –Strategic philanthropy The synergistic use of organizational core competencies and resources to address key stakeholders’ interests and achieve both organizational and social benefits

8 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–84–8

9 4–94–9 The European Eco-label FIGURE 4.2 Source: “European Union Eco-label Logo,” Europa (European Union), June 21, 2000.

10 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–10 Social Responsibility Issues Green Marketing –The specific development, pricing, promotion, and distribution of products that do not harm the natural environment Green Marketing Goals –Eliminate the concept of waste –Reinvent the concept of a product –Make prices reflect actual and environmental costs –Make environmentalism profitable

11 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–11 Social Responsibility Issues (cont’d) Consumerism –The efforts of independent individuals, groups, and organizations to protect the rights of consumers Lobbying government officials and agencies Letter-writing campaigns and boycotts Public service announcements Coverage by the news media and the Internet –Consumer “Bill of Rights” Right to safety Right to be informed Right to choose Right to be heard

12 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–12 Social Responsibility Issues (cont’d) Community Relations –Expectations of firms as “good corporate citizens” Philanthropic contributions to civic projects and institutions –Educational, health, cultural, and recreational Employee volunteer participation Employment opportunities and economic development

13 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–13 The Nature of Ethics Ethical Standards CompanyIndustryGovernmentCustomers Interest Groups Society Influence Factors

14 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–14 The Nature of Ethics (cont’d) Ethical Issues Legal Issues Ethical Issues Legal Issues GrayAreasGrayAreas

15 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–15 The Nature of Ethics (cont’d) Ethical Issues in Marketing –Ethical issue An identifiable problem, situation, or opportunity requiring a choice among several actions that must be evaluated as right or wrong, ethical or unethical

16 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–16

17 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–17 Factors That Influence the Ethical Decision-Making Process in Marketing FIGURE 4.3

18 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–18 The Nature of Ethics (cont’d) The Ethical Decision-Making Process –Influence factors Individual—personal values and principles of right and wrong, socialization through family, social groups, religion, and education Organizational—work groups, committees, coworkers Opportunity—business and organizational conditions which limit, punish, encourage, or reward ethical/unethical decisions

19 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–19 The Relationship of Organizational Values to Employee Satisfaction FIGURE 4.4 Source: Ethics Resource Center, The Ethics Resource Center’s 2000 National Business Ethics Survey: How Employees Perceive Ethics at Work (Washington, D.C.: Ethics Resource Center, 2000), p. 85. Reprinted with permission.

20 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–20 Sources of Pressure to Compromise Ethics Standards at Work FIGURE 4.5 Source: Ethics Resource Center, The Ethics Resource Center’s 2000 National Business Ethics Survey: How Employees Perceive Ethics at Work (Washington, D.C.: Ethics Resource Center, 2000), p. 38. Reprinted with permission.

21 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–21 The Nature of Ethics (cont’d) Improving Ethical Conduct in Marketing –Codes of conduct (ethics) Formalized rules and standards that describe what the company expects of its employees –Ethics officers High-ranking persons (known to respect legal and ethical standards) in the organization who have responsibilities for –creating and distributing codes of conduct. –providing advice about ethical issues. –overseeing and enforcing of the code of conduct.

22 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–22

23 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–23

24 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–24

25 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–25 The Nature of Ethics (cont’d) Implementing Ethics and Legal Compliance Programs –Provide open communication and coaching on ethical issues (create a value-based corporate culture). –Enforce standards and impose penalties or punishment for codes of conduct violations. –Revise compliance programs as necessary. –Make compliance programs an essential part of the overall marketing strategy implementation.

26 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–26 Incorporating Social Responsibility and Ethics into Strategic Planning Overall Strategic Marketing Planning Ethics Individual and group decisions Ethics Individual and group decisions Social Responsibility The total effect of marketing decisions on society Social Responsibility The total effect of marketing decisions on society

27 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–27 Incorporating Social Responsibility and Ethics Into Strategic Planning (cont’d) Evaluating whether an activity is ethical and socially responsible: –Ask other persons in the organization for their approval. –Contact concerned consumer, industry, and governmental groups. –Check company policies.

28 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–28 Incorporating Social Responsibility and Ethics into Strategic Planning (cont’d) Being socially responsible and ethical is not easy. Requires organizational commitment to –constantly monitoring trends and changes in society’s values. –developing control procedures to prevent organizational decisions and actions from damaging customer relations. –attempting to predict the long-term effects of products and actions taken to meet current societal wants.

29 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–29

30 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–30 Incorporating Social Responsibility and Ethics Into Strategic Planning (cont’d) Social responsibility and ethics improve marketing performance. –Socially responsible companies (and their employees) can better respond to stakeholder demands. –A company’s reputation for social responsibility is important to consumers’ buying decisions. –Social responsibility and ethical behavior reduce the costs of legal violations, civil litigation, and damaging publicity.

31 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–31 After reviewing this chapter you should: Understand the concept and dimensions of social responsibility. Be able to define and describe the importance of marketing ethics. Be able to discuss ways to improve ethical decisions in marketing. Be aware of the role of social responsibility and ethics in improving marketing performance.

32 Chapter 4 Supplemental Slides Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–32

33 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–33 Key Terms and Concepts The following slides (a listing of terms and concepts) are intended for use at the instructor’s discretion. To rearrange the slide order or alter the content of the presentation –select “Slide Sorter” under View on the main menu. –left click on an individual slide to select it; hold and drag the slide to a new position in the slide show. –To delete an individual slide, click on the slide to select, and press the Delete key. –Select “Normal” under View on the main menu to return to normal view.

34 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–34 Important Terms Marketing Citizenship –The adoption of a strategic focus for fulfilling the economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic social responsibilities expected by stakeholders Stakeholders –Constituents who have a “stake” or claim in some aspect of the company’s products, operations, markets, industry, and outcomes Marketing Ethics –Principles and standards that define acceptable marketing conduct as determined by various stakeholders

35 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–35 Important Terms Cause-Related Marketing –The practice of linking products to a particular cause on an ongoing or short-term basis Strategic Philanthropy –The synergistic use of organizational core competencies and resources to address key stakeholders’ interests and achieve both organizational and social benefits Green Marketing –The specific development, pricing, promotion, and distribution of products that do not harm the natural environment

36 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–36 Important Terms Consumerism –The efforts of independent individuals, groups, and organizations to protect the rights of consumers Community Relations –Expectations of firms as “good corporate citizens” Ethical Issue –An identifiable problem, situation, or opportunity requiring a choice among several actions that must be evaluated as right or wrong, ethical or unethical Codes of Conduct –Formalized rules and standards that describe what the company expects of its employees

37 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–37 Transparency Figure 4G Type and Observations of Ethical Misconduct Source: Joseph Joshua, Ethics Resource Center, 2000 National Business Ethics Survey: How Employees Perceive Ethics at Work, p. 30. Used with permission.

38 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–38 Transparency Figure 4M Will Consumers Pay an Extra 25¢/Gallon to Reduce Pollution and Global Warming? Source: “Americans Split on Paying Higher Prices to Reduce Pollution,” USA Today, September 4, 2001, p. A1. Used with permission

39 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–39 Transparency Figure 4O Importance of Company Reputation to Consumers Today Versus Five Years Ago Source: “Watch What You Say,” American Demographics, July 2000, p. 24. Adapted with permission. Source: Wirthlin Worldwide

40 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 4–40 Transparency Figure 4P Business Ethics Magazine’s Best Corporate Citizens 1.Procter & Gamble 2.Hewlett-Packard 3.Fannie Mae 4.Motorola 5.IBM 6.Sun Microsystems 7.Herman Miller 8.Polaroid 9.St. Paul Cos. 10.Freddie Mac Source: Philip Johansson, “The 100 Best Corporate Citizens,” Business Ethics, March/April 2001, p. 15. Used with permission.


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