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Improving Student Efficacy Through Engaged Parents and Innovative Community Partnerships Mechelle Bryson, Ed.D., Gretchen Pace, and Penny Tramel ACET Conference.

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Presentation on theme: "Improving Student Efficacy Through Engaged Parents and Innovative Community Partnerships Mechelle Bryson, Ed.D., Gretchen Pace, and Penny Tramel ACET Conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 Improving Student Efficacy Through Engaged Parents and Innovative Community Partnerships Mechelle Bryson, Ed.D., Gretchen Pace, and Penny Tramel ACET Conference October 30, 2013

2 2

3 ∗ Achievement Gaps ∗ Attitude Gap ∗ Equity Gaps ∗ Engagement Gaps ∗ Opportunity Gaps We Live In Challenging Times

4 Who Is Coppell Middle School West? Student Population

5 Who Is Coppell Middle School West? Demographic Data

6 ∗ A Place Where Learners Do Not Power Down to Learn ∗ A Place Where Learner Choice and Voice is Honored ∗ A Place Where Customization is the Norm, Not the Exception ∗ A Place Where Relationships are Cultivated Through the Unique Story of Every Learner ∗ A Place Where Demography Doesn’t Determine a Child’s Destiny Our Vision for Our Schools

7 ∗ “The current and future health of America’s 21 st Century Economy depends directly on how broadly and deeply American reach a new level of literacy – 21 st Century Literacy – that includes strong academic skills, thinking, reasoning, teamwork skills, and proficiency in using technology.” ∗ 21 st Century Workforce Commission National Alliance of Business Future-Ready Learners

8 THERE IS A HIDDEN VARIABLE REGARDING LEARNER AND CAMPUS SUCCESS.

9 ∗ Beliefs matter ∗ Self-efficacy is a powerful belief system that can make a difference in our schools ∗ Self-efficacy beliefs can predict motivation ∗ Self-efficacy beliefs can predict learning outcomes. IT IS EFFICACY

10 ∗ The “beliefs in one’s capabilities to organize and execute a course of action required to produce a given attainment” (Bandura, 1997). ∗ Part of an individual’s self system that enables the individual to evaluate her/his performance (Bandura, 1986,1993,1997). Self-Efficacy Is

11 ∗ Choice of behavior ∗ People tend to avoid engaging in a task where their efficacy is low, and generally undertake tasks where their efficacy is high. ∗ Effort expenditure and persistence ∗ The stronger the perceived self-efficacy, the more vigorous and persistent are people’s efforts. ∗ Thought patterns and emotional reactions ∗ Perceived self-efficacy also shapes causal thinking. High efficacy people attribute failure to insufficient effort; low efficacy attribute failure to deficient ability. Bandura, 1986 SELF-EFFICACY AFFECTS ON THE INDIVIDUAL

12 ∗ Fun Slide or Quote Self-Efficacy Matters

13 ∗ What? A Need for Change ∗ How? Reinvent How We Served Our Learners ∗ Who? Stakeholders ∗ Where? Bring it to Them ∗ When? NOW! ∗ Why? Bridging the Gap Genesis: Our Story Begins

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15 ∗ Past Efforts: ∗ Irving Bible Church ∗ CMS West ∗ Put The Pieces Together Creating Community Partnerships

16 Our Story Continues Home School Learner Community

17 ∗ Increase Parent Involvement ∗ Increase participation in Academic Tutoring ∗ Build Stronger Relationships ∗ Close Gaps ∗ Sense of Belonging Purpose of Program

18 18 Parent Benefit ∗ Trust ∗ Relationship with School ∗ Partnerships

19 ∗ Family participation in education was twice as predictive of students’ academic success as family socioeconomic status. Some of the more intensive programs had effects that were 10 times greater than other factors. ∗ Walberg (1984) in his review of 29 studies of school–parent programs. Parent Involvement

20 ∗ Higher grades, test scores, and graduation rates ∗ Better school attendance ∗ Increased motivation, better self-esteem ∗ Lower rates of suspension ∗ Decreased use of drugs and alcohol ∗ Fewer instances of violent behavior ∗ Parent Teacher Association Meta-Analysis Studies show that when parents are involved students have:

21 Belief Matters!

22 Is that efficacy can be altered Is that efficacy can be cultivated Is that efficacy should be cultivated THE GREAT NEWS!

23 1. Mastery Experiences 2. Vicarious Experiences 3. Verbal Persuasion 4. Psychological State (Bandura, 1977; 1986; 1993; 1995; 1997) Efficacy can be fostered and promoted through the four sources of efficacy information

24 ∗ Authentic Mastery Experiences ∗ Achievements ∗ Actual Performance ∗ Direct Experiences MASTERY EXPERIENCES

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26 ∗ Observing Others ∗ Modeling ∗ Media Vicarious Experiences

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28 ∗ Affirmation ∗ Feedback ∗ Timely ∗ Relevant ∗ Specific ∗ Accurate ∗ Clear Concise Expectations VERBAL PERSUASION

29 ∗ Verbal Persuasions at Work

30 ∗ Anxiety ∗ Stress ∗ Mood ∗ Fatigue ∗ Arousal EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE PSYCHOLOGICAL STATE

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32 ∗ Attendance, failure rate, grades data ∗ Learner participation & retention ∗ Educator participation & retention ∗ Relationship have improved between learners and educators, students and school and parents and school as well as deepened relationship Outcomes

33 ∗ Expansion to Terrific Tuesday ∗ Expansion of Wrangler Wednesday Expansion

34 ∗ College Visits ∗ First generation club ∗ Build alignment with Elementary School about building a culture of college. ∗ Parent groups Next Steps

35 Improving Student Academic Fluency through Technology. Immigrant Students and iPads Initiative

36 ∗ Many are Under-served ∗ Many are Under-resourced ∗ Assimilation is complex Genesis: A New Beginning

37 ∗ What did we do? ∗ What was our Purpose? Genesis: A New Beginning

38 ∗ What did we do? ∗ What was our Purpose? Genesis: A New Beginning

39 The Five P’s of Supporting Change Initiatives Permission Protection Processes Patience Persistence

40 ∗ Change is the constant, the signal for rebirth, the egg of the phoenix. Christina Baldwin Change Is The Name Of The Game

41 ∗ Bandura, A. (1977). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. Psychological Review, 84(12), ∗ Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. ∗ Bandura, A. (1993). Perceived self-efficacy in cognitive development and functioning. Educational Psychologist, 28(2), ∗ Bandura, A. (1995). Self-efficacy in changing societies. New York: Cambridge University Press. ∗ Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: W. H. Freeman. ∗ 732_7.pdf 732_7.pdf Work Cited


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