Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health. Every child and adolescent deserves to experience joy, have high self-esteem, have friends, acquire a sense.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health. Every child and adolescent deserves to experience joy, have high self-esteem, have friends, acquire a sense."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health

2 Every child and adolescent deserves to experience joy, have high self-esteem, have friends, acquire a sense of efficacy, and believe that he or she can succeed in life.

3 Goals Promote mental health in children, adolescents, and families Provide prevention, early recognition, and intervention strategies in primary care settings Encourage partnerships and collaboration between health professionals, families, and communities

4 Development Funded by HRSA/Maternal and Child Health Bureau; coordinated and published by the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown Public Policy Institute, Georgetown University Developed by an interdisciplinary panel of experts to provide guidelines for mental health promotion for infants, children, and adolescents Follows tradition of Bright Futures: Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents (1994; 2000; 2002)

5 Contributors Introductory Material Michael Jellinek, M.D., Chair Judith S. Palfrey, M.D. Robert Needlman, M.D. Making Mental Health Supervision Accessible Kelly Kelleher, M.D., M.P.H., Chair David K. Nace, M.D. Sarah H. Scholle, Dr.P.H. Infancy Ann Stadtler, M.S.N., Chair Kathryn Barnard, R.N., Ph.D. T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. Suzanne D. Dixon, M.D., M.P.H. Denis Drotar, Ph.D. Margot Kaplan-Sanoff, Ed.D. Early Childhood Barbara J. Howard, M.D., Chair Raymond A. Sturner, M.D. June Solnit Sale, M.S.W. Roxane K. Kaufmann, M.A. Middle Childhood Eve Spratt, M.D., Chair Cynthia Cupit Swenson, Ph.D. Lisa Hand, M.D. Janice Key, M.D. Michelle Macias, M.D. Linda Marsh, R.N. Robert Needlman, M.D. Adolescence Martin Fisher, M.D., Chair Stewart L. Adelson, M.D. Alwyn T. Cohall, M.D. Lois T. Flaherty, M.D. Linda Juszczak, D.N.Sc., M.P.H., C.P.N.P. Doris Pastore, M.D. Sheridan A. Phillips, Ph.D. Mark D. Weist, Ph.D. Bridges Bina P. Patel, M.D., Chair Linden J. Cassidy, M.D. Eve Spratt, M.D. Mark Wolraich, M.D.

6

7 Organization of Implementation Guide Making Mental Health Supervision Accessible Developmental Chapters –Health Supervision Questions –Key Points and Tips –Resources/References –Areas of Concern Bridge Topics –Assessment –Interventions Tools

8 Accessibility Making Mental Health Supervision Accessible –Making Mental Health Supervision Accessible –Managing Time and Reimbursement Issues –Continuity of Care –Training –Cultural Competence –Attitudes About Mental Health –Coordination and Referral

9 Developmental Chapters – Infancy (ages newborn–11 months) – Early Childhood (ages 1–4) – Middle Childhood (ages 5–10) – Adolescence (ages 11–21)

10 Developmental Chapters Each developmental chapter is organized into four functional areas –Self: How children see themselves –Family: How children relate to family members and function at home –Friends: How children socialize with peers and friends –Community: How children function at school and within their community

11 Developmental Chapters Health Supervision Questions from Bright Futures: Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents, Second Edition –Is Carlotta easy or difficult to console? –How do you deal with tantrums? –Does Kim bring friends home? Does she go to friends’ homes? –What does Peter do when he is stressed, angry, or frustrated? –What would you do if someone pressured you to have sex? –What do you think about smoking? Chewing (or spit) tobacco? Drinking? Taking drugs?

12 Infancy Self Temperament; Regulation Family Attachment; Family Formation Community Stimulation

13 Early Childhood Self Self-Control; Self-Esteem Family Cooperation; Sibling Relationships Friends Socialization Community School Readiness

14 Middle Childhood Self Self-Esteem/Inner Life Family What Matters at Home Friends Friendships Community School Functioning

15 Adolescence Self Self-esteem; Mood; Body Image; Sexuality Family Identity and Independence Family Relationships Roles, Rules, and Responsibilities Friends Friends and Leisure Activities Community School Functioning Injury Prevention Violence Perpetration and Exposure Substance Use and Abuse

16 Developmental Chapters Areas of Concern: Examples –Insecure Attachment –Severe Tantrums –Difficulty Forming Friendships –Bullying –Academic Difficulties and Low Self-esteem –Mood Problems

17 Developmental Chapters Office Practices to Promote Family Partnership Community Practices to Promote Child Mental Health Developmental Checklists

18 Bridges Anxiety Disorders Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Child Maltreatment Domestic Violence Eating Disorders Learning Disabilities Mental Retardation Mood Disorders Oppositional and Aggressive Behaviors Parental Depression Pervasive Developmental Disorders Substance Use Disorders Bridge Topics

19 Bridges Each Bridge topic is organized as follows –Key Facts –Description of Symptoms –Commonly Associated Disorders –Interventions

20 Bridges Potential Interventions –Suggested tools and methods for assessment –Guidelines for crisis stabilization –Interventions that may be implemented at the problem stage before more severe disorders develop –Strategies for primary care management of the mental health problem or mental disorder –When to consider a mental health referral and types of referral services to be considered –Ongoing collaboration with mental health professionals and other service providers –Further resources and references

21 Mental Health Tool Kit Tools for Health Professionals –Screening measures/questionnaires –Resource lists –Interactive handouts –Forms to facilitate communication with schools Tools for Families –Health education handouts –Reading lists for families/children

22 Mental Health Tool Kit Sample Tools for Health Professionals –Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) –Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) –Postcard Satisfaction Survey –Homework Problems Sample Tools for Families –How to Soothe a Crying Infant –Teen Dating Violence –IEP Meeting Checklist –Homework Tips

23 Implementation Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health can be used to Provide information to health care professionals about the essentials of mental health promotion Identify the support that infants, children, adolescents, and families need for good mental health Develop and implement mental health promotion programs and policies

24 Implementation Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health has applications for a broad range of settings, including Primary clinical care Infant mental health programs Child care centers School-based health centers Training Programs Parent education programs

25 Contact Information Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health To order, visit www.brightfutures.org For more information, contact Mary C. Froehle, Ph.D. E-mail: mfroehle@ncemch.org


Download ppt "Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health. Every child and adolescent deserves to experience joy, have high self-esteem, have friends, acquire a sense."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google