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Bell Ringer 1. Draw a horizontal line on your paper. 2. Write the word Birth at the start of the line and Beginning of Adolescence at the end. 3. Place.

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Presentation on theme: "Bell Ringer 1. Draw a horizontal line on your paper. 2. Write the word Birth at the start of the line and Beginning of Adolescence at the end. 3. Place."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bell Ringer 1. Draw a horizontal line on your paper. 2. Write the word Birth at the start of the line and Beginning of Adolescence at the end. 3. Place at least 4 of your most important milestones on your “life- line”.

2 Bell Ringer – Use your “Major Studies in Infant and Childhood Development” Chart to match up each description to the correct Psychologist. A. Mary Ainsworth B. Harry F. Harlow C. Konrad Lorenz 1. he was able to get newborn geese to become attached to him. 2. her study showed that most infants are very attached to their mothers. 3. found that most infants become upset when a stranger approaches them without their mother present. 4. study showed that newborn monkeys spent a greater amount of time with their cloth surrogate mother, than with their wire surrogate mother. 5. helped to prove that the bond between mothers and newborns stems from contact comfort rather than feeding. 6. Illustrated the concept of imprinting – the first moving object met by the newborn bird is somehow stamped immediately into its brain.

3 Bell Ringer – Use your “Major Studies in Infant and Childhood Development” Chart to match up each description to the correct Psychologist. A. Jean Piaget B. Lawrence Kohlberg C. Diane Baumrind 1. Based on her research with American families, she came up with 3 styles of parenting – authoritative, permissive, and authoritarian. 2. Found that children’s thinking develops in a sequence of stages – younger children do not understand concepts that older children do. 3. Described authoritative parents as those that combine warmth with positive kinds of strictness. 4. Used a story about a man who steals a drug to save his dying wife to research the moral development of children. 5. Found that the youngest children base “right and wrong” on doing what is necessary to avoid punishment. 6. Whild observing children performing different tasks, he found that children under the age of 7 did not understand the concept of conservation.

4 Bell-Ringer Read the following situation, and then explain how each of the four types of parents might respond. –Authoritarian - –Authoritative - –Permissive - –Uninvolved – Little Edwin gets in trouble in class for disrupting his 1st grade teacher by talking to his classmates. The teacher calls home and tells Edwin’s mom about the situation.

5 Developmental Psychology-Infancy and Childhood Unit 7

6 Developmental Psychology The study of YOU from womb to tomb! A branch of psychology that studies physical, cognitive and social changes throughout the lifespan.

7 Developmental Psychology Two BIG Issues 1. Nature vs. Nurture 2. Stages vs. Continuity

8 Nature vs Nurture While going through this unit always keep in the back of your head…. Are you who you are because of: The way you were born- Nature? The way you were raised- Nurture?

9 Stages vs Continuity Does change occur smoothly over time? – Continuity Or through a series of predetermined steps? – Stages Are there stages in which skills emerge at certain points of development?

10 Developmental Psychology There are three types of development we will study… 1.physical development 2.cognitive development 3.social development

11 1. Physical Development Focus on our physical changes over time.

12 Physical Development Maturation – Biological growth processes that enable orderly changes in behavior, relatively uninfluenced by experience. –Physical growth, regardless of the environment. –Although the timing of our growth may be different, the sequence is almost always the same.

13 2. Cognitive Development Focus on how our thought process develops –Thinking –Communicating –Learning

14 3. Social Development Focus on interactions with others –Relationships –How we act around others

15 Major Studies in Infant and Childhood Development: Read your article on your own. In Your Small Group Have each member summarize what they learned about the study – EVERYONE gets a turn! 2. Complete the correct section of the chart with your group members. 3. Write your findings on your Big Sheet of Paper so you can share with your classmates.

16 Infant and Childhood Development newborn: birth – 1 monthnewborn: birth – 1 month infant: 1 month – 2 yearsinfant: 1 month – 2 years childhood: 2-12childhood: 2-12

17 1-Physical Development: Healthy Newborns Turn head towards voices. See 8 to 12 inches from their faces. Gaze longer at human like objects right from birth.

18 Physical Development: Motor Skills Infants do not LEARN these skills, it is part of maturation…

19 Physical Development: Infant Motor Development Sequence the same- but once again, timing varies. First learn to roll over, sit up unsupported, crawl, walk etc… Maturation sets course of dev. Experience adjusts it

20 Physical Development: Reflexes Inborn automatic responses. Rooting Sucking Grasping Moro (startle) Babinski (soles/toes)

21 2-Cognitive Development It was once thought that kids were just stupid versions of adults. Then came along Jean Piaget –Kids learn differently than adults

22 Cognitive Development Jean Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development –Intelligence & the ability to understand develops gradually as the child grows –Young children think differently than older children and adults –4 stages

23 Piaget’s Stages of Cognitive Development 1.Sensorimotor 2.Preoperational 3.Concrete operational 4.Formal operational

24 Stages of Cognitive Development Stage 1- Sensorimotor Stage Experience the world through our senses & actions. Object permanence* begins to develop after 6 months. Age 0-2 *the awareness that things continue to exist even when we can’t perceive them. **shaking a rattle, banging on toys, banging on tray or high chair

25 no object permanence yet!

26 Stages of Cognitive Development Stage 2-Preoperational Stage Age 2-7 Have object permanence Begin to use language to represent objects and ideas Egocentrism- inability to look at the world through anyone’s eyes but their own. Do NOT understand concept of conservation. Animism-belief that inanimate objects are living, just like the kid. –Popularity of cartoons

27 Egocentrism

28 Stages of Cognitive Development Preoperational Stage Conservation - idea that a quantity remains the same despite changes in appearance –part of logical thinking.

29 Conservation

30 Stages of Cognitive Development Stage 3-Concrete Operational Stage 7-11 years old Understand concept of conservation. Decrease in egocentrism Can think logically, use analogies, and perform mathematical transformations.

31 Stages of Cognitive Development Stage 4-Formal Operational Stage What would the world look like with no sun light? Picture god What way do you best learn? Age 12-adulthood Abstract reasoning Manipulate objects in our minds without seeing them Hypothesis testing Trial and Error Not every adult gets to this stage

32 Cognitive Development- The development of moral reasoning Lawrence Kohlberg- Presented children, teens, and adults with a dilemma—whether a person should steal medicine to save a loved one’s life. He claimed that we pass through 3 basic levels (with 2 stages each) of moral thinking.

33 Cognitive Development- The development of moral reasoning 1.Pre-conventional Moral Reasoning – –Before age 9, base judgment on consequences 2.Conventional Moral Reasoning – –By early adolescence/teens, base judgment on whether act conforms to conventional standards of right and wrong. 3.Post-conventional Moral Reasoning – –Base judgment on one’s personal values, not conventional standards.

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