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Presented by: Dr. Kathy Kochersperger Gay Drake “Adapted Physical Education Specialists”

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Presentation on theme: "Presented by: Dr. Kathy Kochersperger Gay Drake “Adapted Physical Education Specialists”"— Presentation transcript:

1 Presented by: Dr. Kathy Kochersperger Gay Drake “Adapted Physical Education Specialists”

2 Who are we? a. Gay b. Kathy c. Holly d. Karen What is the history of S.M. Adapted Physical Education? a. IDEA law (phys. ed. mandated by law) b. consultants vs. direct service providers How do we determine when adapted physical education services are needed and how these services will be provided?

3 Level of Services Determination a.Interview b.Observation 1.No Support Needed a.Participates adequately with teacher assistance b.Behavior is age appropriate/under control c.Participates safely d.Follows class rules and instructions

4 Level of Services (contd.) 2.Support Needed a. Observation (to stay on task) and occasional intervention b.Behaviors are easily managed c. Proximity occasionally need to stay on task or safe in play d. “Hands on” support needed for new/unfamiliar tasks (until learned and able to participate with peers) 3.Full Support Needed a. Behaviors not well controlled b. Motor skills lacking c. Struggles with social interaction and participation in class activities

5 Full Class Inclusion Motor Skills (run, jump, hit, move,... Yes No Cognitive Ability (processing, reasoning, reading, writing,... ) Yes No Environmental Factors (safety, peer influence, personality,...) Yes No

6 Full Class Inclusion Motor Skills (run, jump, hit, move,... No Cognitive Ability (processing, reasoning, reading, writing,... ) No Environmental Factors (safety, peer influence, personality,...) No Considerations

7 This may be one of the hardest classes you will support - Continuous movement of students during  Continuous movement of students during activity participation activity participation  Larger class size  Many transitions occurring throughout the class period period  May cause “undesired” behaviors to surface with some students some students  Familiarity/understanding of subject content

8 What do I know about the students to whom I’ve been assigned for the physical education class period?  What is the diagnosis/disability  What are the physical limitations  What are the cognitive limitations  What are the safety precautions for class participation participation  Are there behavior plans to help students experience successful class participation and social interaction successful class participation and social interaction with peers/teachers with peers/teachers

9 Remember:  More similarities than differences a. All students aim to please b. All students act out c. All students seek attention What else do I know about my student(s)?  need more time for processing  motor skill development – delay or exposure  sensory concerns  passivity in sports play – may need to be taught some “assertiveness”  understanding of concepts (over, under, around, ….)

10 What else do I know about my student(s)?  Learning style  visual, auditory, kinesthetic  splinter skills  ability to transfer skills from setting to setting  Motivators  music  need for breaks (occasional)  sensory diet  praise, …..

11 What is the “atmosphere or barometric pressure” like in the gymnasium?  Do I feel welcome? Or do I feel like an unwelcome visitor?  Do I need to be prepared with ideas for assisting students? Or do I receive guidance and expectations – for myself and students? receive guidance and expectations – for myself and students?  Am I treated with respect? Am I considered a contributing member of the team? Or do my ideas “not hold water” or seem to fall on “deaf the team? Or do my ideas “not hold water” or seem to fall on “deaf ears”? ears”?  Are the students to whom I’ve been assigned, accepted as a part of the class? the class?  Accepted during all activities  Accepted during most activities – with modifications/adaptations given when it’s best for the safety and welfare of the students given when it’s best for the safety and welfare of the students  Do not seem to be accepted at all – always given parallel activity for participating elsewhere – hallway, corner, …. away from other for participating elsewhere – hallway, corner, …. away from other students even when abilities warrant participation with peers in students even when abilities warrant participation with peers in some manner some manner

12 Goals for Participation in Physical Education 1.Enhance a positive self-concept and body image, while building self- esteem 2.To develop/enhance motor skills to the highest degree of capability 3.To enhance creative expression and learn to safely take risks to learn new skills 4.To enhance independence in play 5.To develop appropriate play skills including good sportsmanship 6.To develop an awareness/understanding of (while practicing) the components required for a lifestyle of healthy physical activity and physical fitness 7.To enhance the social skills involved in activity participation

13 Meeting Goals 1.Develop modifications/adaptations of skills and/or class activities to help students be successful in participation efforts 2.Model appropriate/expected behavior 3.Model skills involved in class participation 4.Assist students with social behaviors and peer interaction 5.Encourage safe “risk taking” to help develop a broader spectrum of participation “likes/dislikes ” 6.Encourage independence in all activity participation, as capabilities/abilities allow 7.Expect students to participate to the best of their ability throughout the entire class period

14 S= student centered U= focuses on the uniqueness of each student C= challenges each student to do their best C= creative E= enthusiastic S= supportive of all students S= shows care for the safety and well-being of all students

15 Hints for Success 1.Listen to instructions as they are given – become a learner first (only enhances your own ability to teach/assist your student) 2.Contact teachers/adapted physical education staff if having trouble modifying/adapting activities/curricular lessons 3.Use your best creative skills – actions, cues, modeling, ….think outside of the box 4.Maintain positive attitude and outlook 5.Be enthusiastic when recognizing student accomplishments, trials, efforts

16 Hints for Success (cont.) 6. Expect the best effort – push to reach the potential 7. Discourage “manipulative” efforts 8.Watch for frustration “overload” 9.Catch students being good or putting forth good efforts 10.Remember: at times the best teaching/assisting is not helping 11. Know your student (behaviors, safety concerns, capabilities, disabilities)

17 Hints for Success (cont.) 12.Help reduce/eliminate inappropriate behaviors that might “embarrass” peers or make them feel uncomfortable – assist with age-appropriate behavior 13. Quietly deal with behaviors that need to be addressed 14.Anticipation is a big key to student success – one step ahead of frustration, a behavioral “outburst”, …..catching a student being good 15.Keep your expectations high – for yourself and students 16.Remember small steps are often huge successes 17.Have fun

18 Student Goals for Physical Education  Learn to follow directions  Learn to self direct play activity  Learn basic rules and/or game strategies for active involvement  Develop personal likes and dislikes of activity through class exploration  Build self esteem and confidence

19 Student Goals for Physical Education  Understand personal limitations  Learn to adapt  Begin a lifetime and lifestyle of fitness and fun

20 D do your best U understand student needs T teach the skills I include your student in all/most activities E encourage appropriate behavior at all times S supervise at all times

21 OutstandingAcceptableUnacceptable Actively participates (listen and apply) in all class activity o With best interest of student in mind o Promotes success o Promotes growth and “stretching” of capabilities Is a “team” player – student, physical education teacher, classroom teacher Creatively assists student with development in physical education o Uses resources (physical education teacher, case manager, classroom teacher, adapted physical education teacher) as needed o Checks with physical education (approval) before “changing” curriculum application Gives assistance as needed and appropriate for student’s level o Proximity – reminder to stay on task o Verbal, physical prompting o Allows for personal exploration Remains with student for duration of class period Assists students at level of need o Hands on assistance (for safety or skill practice) o Verbal prompt o Reinforcement o Encouragement o Observation Actively listens to teacher’s instructions – gain knowledge of day’s lesson to apply to child’s learning Dresses appropriately for day’s activity Assists teacher as needed – to help with student success in all class activities o Complete participation o Modification/adaptation o Parallel curriculum participation Remains with student for duration of class period Stands off to side (away from student) when assistance is needed Disrupts student (any student) learning o Not listening to instructions given during lesson presentation o Talks with others during class time (off task conversation) o Unnecessary discipline disruption o Loud verbalization to student o Allows behavior to escalate without attempts to subside Does not demonstrate an interest in assisting student towards success o Reading, talking, engaging in off task activity a majority of the class period o Oblivious to activity and student “happening” o Not try to assist o Overly “protective” of student (stifling capabilities) Does not always stay with student for duration of class Does not allow student to remain in class for duration (exception: behavior concerns warrant removal)

22 Duties/Responsibilities for the physical education classroom: 1.Assist physical educator with simple duties if you are still able to maintain responsibilities with student(s) to whom you are assigned – especially if student is well behaved and independent 2.Assist student(s) with all class activities as needed – dressing, warm up activities, game play, social interactions, ….. 3.Keep student(s) safe 4.Assist all students in learning to accept one another (recognizing diversity and abilities)and in being respectful to self and others – keep an eye on “bullying” (among all students) 5.Help students develop skills of participation – striving for independence and adapting skills as needed for successful participation 6.Act on your own instincts of what is needed/best for student success; ask for help when you need it

23 Duties/Responsibilities for the physical education classroom (cont.): 7.Be on time to class 8.Dress appropriately for participation in physical education class activities 9.Be prepared to move actively while keeping all limbs available for use as needed 10. Be prepared to use close proximity with struggling students (skills or behavioral), while keeping an eye on the level of frustration students (skills or behavioral), while keeping an eye on the level of frustration 11. Encourage students to use proper form (to the best of their ability) in all activities of their ability) in all activities 12. Follow through with other “plans of action” as established – behavior, communication, “first/then” rewarding… behavior, communication, “first/then” rewarding…

24 Precautions: 1.Down’s Syndrome - atlantal axial 2.Shunts 3.Seizures 4.Visual/Auditory Deficits 5.Primitive Reflexes – still intact 6.Reaction Time 7.Processing Time

25 Precautions (cont.): 8.“Earth Bound” 9.Depth Perception 10.Marfans’ Syndrome 11.Cerebral Palsy 12.Autism Spectrum Disorders 13.Spinae Bifida – latex allergies 14.Brittle Bone Disease 15. Severely Multiply Disabled

26 , Considerations Modifying Motor: Change rules of play, slow the pace, select peer groupings for play/practice, allow for more play time and less concentration on rules or strategic play Cognitive: Create a different test- applying skills most needed for understanding and performance, allow for individual learning styles to be used, require less formal rules and/or strategies of game play Environmental: Support staff assist as appropriate (physical, verbal, proximity), change the “look” of the game- rules, strategic play, select peer partners/teams Motor: Allow student to play game with or without peers, use different equipment (more adaptable to student’s ability) Cognitive: Present information in different format (auditory, visual,...) and/or in very basic format, allow for individual adaptations- correcting with simple changes Environmental: Use different equipment, select peer groups for participation, change rules of play and/or allow for “special” play occasionally, slow the pace of play or information presentation Adapting Motor: Participate in separate activity prepared by phys. ed. or adapted phys. ed. Cognitive: Read test to student, allow for verbalization or drawing of answers, allow extra time to complete task, simplify rules or strategic play, simplify skill presentation and practice, reduce/eliminate amount of game play- more practice of skills, add one skill to another until “whole” is understood Environmental: Participate in separate activity, select peer groupings for participation, use very basic skills, rules, and strategic play Exclusion “Parallel Play”

27 Modifications or or Thinking Outside of the Box 1.Look for contrasting colors – background to ball – when doing catching skills 2.Develop some “catchy” clues 3.Shorten the handles of manipulative equipment 4.Allow “sitting” if balance is an issue (prevent allowing it to become “habit forming” behavior) 5.Repeat, repeat, repeat, …………. 6.Think in long terms – what will they really need as an adult

28 Modifications or or Thinking Outside of the Box Considerations when assessing (written) students with disabilities: 1.Type of learner a. Visual/Auditory/Tactile a. Visual/Auditory/Tactile b. Reader/Non-reader b. Reader/Non-reader c. Communication c. Communication 2.Questions a. Layout b. Number c. Complexity/wording 3.Importance of knowledge being assessed a. Healthy lifestyle b. Lifetime – fun/fitness b. Lifetime – fun/fitness

29 Activity Participation : 1.Practice modifying activities/skills 2.Experience participation with a disability 3.Share ideas with colleagues 4.Gather information on adapting equipment/skills 5.Understand how others learn and apply techniques for teaching 6.Write a test for assessing a student’s knowledge 7.Learn to “think outside of the box” 8.Have fun

30 Thanks for Attending Questions/Concerns: bcdrake@smsd.org bckocher@smsd.org 993-9778 Visit our web backpack: inservice information modifications ideas for community-based instruction


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