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1 The figure below is a unit square with lines from vertices to opposite midpoints. What is the central polygon, and what is its area? Warm - up.

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Presentation on theme: "1 The figure below is a unit square with lines from vertices to opposite midpoints. What is the central polygon, and what is its area? Warm - up."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 The figure below is a unit square with lines from vertices to opposite midpoints. What is the central polygon, and what is its area? Warm - up

2 2 The students will know the practices and theories that lead to effective management of a public school classroom. Classroom Management

3 3 Overview David Johnson’s “Every Minute Counts” and “Motivation Counts”. My 32 years of teaching and 17 years of classroom observation. Continued Medial review. Canter Model (Assertive Discipline) from C. M. Charles’, “Building Classroom Discipline.”

4 4 Overview continued Building YOUR system of classroom management from C. M. Charles. Handout of personalized discipline model by Deborah Sund. Mathematical problem and discussion of the theory to solve it. Teaching problem analogy. If time we will cover the “Reality Model” of William Glasser.

5 5 Classroom Practices. Every Minute Counts David Johnson You should be an efficient, well-organized teacher aware of everyone and everything that is happening in your classroom. Establish a routine Start out strict Keep homework relevant Learn student’s names Use correct English Continued

6 6 Classroom Practices. Prevent cheating Work the entire period Don’t sit down Use rewards (oral and written) often Check attendance daily Call on every student Adjust your lesson plans as needed Encourage active involvement Keep students busy or they will keep you busy Continued

7 7 Classroom Practices Continued Show students respect and expect respect in return Joke and tease judiciously Grade students fairly Return papers and test promptly Do not belittle students Let students know you care about them

8 8 My Experiences Discipline Practices. Problems can be avoided with awareness and precautions. Speak in a loud, clear, and firm voice Be polite Never show fear Tell the student to stop the improper behavior Do not insult or embarrass the student Avoid public demands Use the guidance office/administration Use the parents

9 9 My Experiences Administrative Practices Make announcements when necessary Keep your grading up to date Take attendance Maintain complete and neat records Take lunchroom, hall, and study hall duties seriously Be responsible Get to know your colleagues Attend school functions Be honest

10 10 My Experiences The first Day. Set the tone - firm and business like. Tell them what is going to happen. Hand out course syllabus, grading policies, expectations, and rules and regulations with punishments. You will save frustration, discipline problems, and grade problems which means saved time.

11 11 My Experiences Communicating with parents. Comment on something positive about their child. Mention slow progress Allude to plans for the child that will show further progress. Mention difficulties that are interfering with the child’s attainment of goals. Assure the parent that you have a plan for overcoming the difficulties and need parental support in working for the well- being of the child.

12 12 Today is the day when parents are invited to come to the school and follow their child through his schedule. You are teaching an 8 th grade math class of average students. You have been working for several days on word problems. Parents Visitation Day

13 13 Get the secretary to like you. My Experiences Get the janitor to like you.

14 14 Medial Review HOW TO HANDLE DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS Stop and look at the student. Use signals directed to the student - head shakes, frowns, “the look”, etc. Move closer to the student. Stop and speak directly to the student. Stop and pick up grade book and make a notation. Move the offending student. Continued

15 15 Medial Review HOW TO HANDLE DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS Ask the student to come in after class. Contact the parents or guardians of the student. a. Clean boards, desks, walls, floors, or just sit. Not to study or do homework. b. NEVER be in a classroom alone with a student with a closed door. Continued

16 16 Medial Review HOW TO HANDLE DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS Send the student to the appropriate administrator. Know what will happen if you send a student to: A counselor. The vice principal. NEVER strike a student.

17 17 Assignment Read Charles; Chapters 6 and 12.

18 18 Find the area of the triangle determined by the x-axis, y-axis and the line with equation y = -2x Warm - up

19 19 THE ASSERTIVE MODEL Lee and Marlene Canter The following is taken from: Building Classroom Discipline, 4 th ed., Charles, C. M., Longman Inc., 1995, White Plains, NY ISBN Teachers should insist on decent responsible behavior from their students. Students need this type of behavior. Parents want this type of behavior. Society expects this type of behavior. The education process fails without this type of behavior. Continued

20 20 THE ASSERTIVE MODEL Teacher’s Rights Teachers have basic educational rights in the classroom. To establish an optimal learning environment. To request and expect appropriate behavior. To receive help from administrators and parents when needed. Continued

21 21 THE ASSERTIVE MODEL Student’s Rights Students have basic rights in the classroom. To have teachers who help limit inappropriate behavior and self-destructive behavior patterns. To choose how to behave, with full understanding of the consequences that automatically follow those choices.

22 22 Assertive Discipline Consist Of: Identifying expectations early. Willingness to say, “I like that,” and “I don’t like that.” Persistence in stating expectations and feelings. Use of firm tone of voice. Maintenance of eye contact. Use of non-verbal gestures in support of verbal statements. Continued

23 23 Assertive Discipline Consist Of: Use of hints, questions, and I-messages rather than demands for requesting appropriate behavior. Follow-through with promises (reasonable consequences, previously established) rather than threats. Assertiveness in confrontations with students, including statements of expectations, indicating consequences that will occur, and why action is necessary.

24 24 FIVE STEPS TO ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE STEP 1. Recognize and remove roadblocks to assertive discipline. Remove negative expectations about students. Influence in positive ways student behavior. All students need limits. We can’t treat all students alike.

25 25 FIVE STEPS TO ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE STEP 2. Practice the use of assertive response styles. Example of students who are talking too much: Non-assertive approach: “For the fifth time, would you two please stop that?” Hostile approach: “All right, you two! That’s the last straw! You either pay attention or you are going to regret it!” Assertive approach: “It is against the rules to talk without permission during the lesson. Please stop talking.”

26 26 FIVE STEPS TO ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE STEP 3. Learning to set limits. Request appropriate behavior through hints, I- messages, questions, and non-verbal behavior. Deliver the limits with tone of voice, eye contact, gestures, use of student name and physical touch.

27 27 FIVE STEPS TO ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE STEP 4. Learn to follow through on limits. Make promises not threats. Select appropriate positive and negative consequences in advance. Set up a system of consequences that you can easily enforce. Practice verbal confrontations that call for follow through.

28 28 FIVE STEPS TO ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE STEP 5. Implementing a system of positive consequences. Personal attention from the teacher. Positive notes to parents. Special rewards. Special privileges. Material rewards. Home rewards. Group rewards.

29 29 Cantor’s Five Steps in Disciplining. The Cantors suggest a five-step plan for rules infractions but caution that a teacher must be comfortable using the model. First Infraction: Student is warned. Second Infraction: Student is given a 10 minute time out (isolation). Third Infraction:Student is given a 15 minute time out. Fourth Infraction:Parents are contacted. Fifth Infraction:Student is sent to the Principal’s office.

30 30 Case Study 1 Two 7 th grade students are in the hall as classes are passing and one says to the other, “I don’t give a shit!”

31 31 Case Study 2 Ashley has appeared to be her usual disrespectful self ever since she arrived in class. When a learning support student asks if he can retake a quiz because he got one wrong she snickers under her breath and says, “Why would you want to do that?”

32 32 Case Study 3 Tom has appeared to be in his usual foul mood ever since arriving in class. He gets up and on his way to sharpen his pencil he bumps into Frank. Frank complains. Tom tells him to shut up. Miss Winters, the teacher, says, “Tom, go back to your seat.” Tom wheels around, swears loudly and says heatedly, “I’ll go when I’m damned good and ready.”

33 33 Building Your System of Management. From Charles Chapter 12. Consider the Nature of Your Students. Junior High - Discipline is difficult for students. Teachers must have exceptional skill at maintaining control, teaching, and building supportive relationships. The teacher is competing with body changes, changing attitudes toward the opposite sex, psychological weaning from parents, and a new school setting with new teaching styles, curriculum and organization.

34 34 Building Your System of Management. From Charles Chapter 12. Consider the nature of your students. High School - This is a time of settling down. Students tend to recognize their interdependence with the larger community. Students assume greater responsibility for their own learning and behavior while looking upon teachers as guides and role models. Unfortunately this is a time when a few students become further alienated from the educational mainstream.

35 35 Three faces of discipline Preventive, Supportive, and Corrective Discipline. Face 1. Preventive discipline. Make your curriculum as worthwhile and enjoyable as possible. (Use the NCTM Principles and Standards.) Take charge in your classroom. With your students make good rules for classroom conduct. Continue to emphasize good manners and living by the golden rule.

36 36 Three faces of discipline Preventive, Supportive, and Corrective Discipline. Face 2. Supportive discipline. Use signals directed to a student needing support. Use physical proximity when signals are ineffective. Show interest in student work. Restructure difficult work or help with it. Continued

37 37 Three faces of discipline Preventive, Supportive, and Corrective Discipline. Face 2. Supportive discipline. Interject humor into lessons that have become tiring. Remove seductive options. Reinforce good behavior in appropriate ways and at appropriate times. Request good behavior.

38 38 Three faces of discipline Preventive, Supportive, and Corrective Discipline. Face 3. Corrective discipline Assertively insist on the two basic rights in the classroom - your right to teach without disruptions and the students’ right to learn. Stop misbehavior. Invoke the consequences tied to the misbehavior. Follow through consistently. Redirect misbehavior in positive directions.

39 39 PASS OUT THE SUND HANDOUT ON PERSONALIZED DISCIPLINE

40 40 Summary Warm-up Problem - Find the area of the triangle determined by the x-axis, y-axis and the line with equation y = -2x Discuss the theory of how to solve the problem. Discipline problem analogy.

41 41 Assignment Read Posamentier; Chapter 3, section 5.

42 42 The Reality Therapy Model of William Glasser. Discussed in Charles. Seven key assumptions: Students can control their behavior. They choose to act the way they do. Good choices produce good behavior and bad choices produce bad behavior. Teachers must always try to help students make good choices. Teachers who truly care about their students accept no excuses for bad behavior. Continued

43 43 The Reality Therapy Model of William Glasser. Discussed in Charles. Seven key assumptions: Reasonable consequences should always follow student misbehavior. Class rules are essential, and they must be enforced. Classroom meetings are effective ways for attending to matters of classroom rules, behavior, and discipline.

44 44 The Reality Therapy Model of William Glasser. Discussed in Charles. Five strategies of the Reality Therapy Model. The teacher should stress personal responsibility and reinforce the idea that students are in school to study and learn. The teacher should establish rules and review classroom procedures. The teacher should accept no excuses for inappropriate behavior. Continued

45 45 The Reality Therapy Model of William Glasser. Discussed in Charles. Five strategies of the Reality Therapy Model. The teacher should have students make value judgments about their misbehavior and suggest suitable alternatives. The teacher should make students aware of the consequences for their misbehavior and be consistent in enforcing these consequences.


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