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Fresh Start Unit 1 Fresh Start Unit1 “Face” is a sense of worth that comes from knowing one’s status and reflects concern with the congruency between.

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Presentation on theme: "Fresh Start Unit 1 Fresh Start Unit1 “Face” is a sense of worth that comes from knowing one’s status and reflects concern with the congruency between."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Fresh Start Unit 1 Fresh Start Unit1

3 “Face” is a sense of worth that comes from knowing one’s status and reflects concern with the congruency between one’s performance or appearance and one’s real worth. “Face” stands for a very important sociological concept in Chinese culture. The concept of “face” roughly translates as honour, good reputation or respect. The essence of “face” lies in the drive for acceptance and approval of other people other than one’s real worth. 1. The importance of “face” Cultural information 1 Cultural Information

4 2. Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. — Oscar Wilde Being yourself is celebrating you, as an individual — learning to express yourself and be happy with who you are. For some people, it’s learning to love yourself. For others, it’s not hiding who you are or changing things about you to fit in. Cultural information 2 Cultural Information

5 3. Steps to be yourself ● define yourself ● stop worrying about how people perceive you ● be honest and open ● relax ● develop and express your individuality ● believe in who you are ● follow your own style Cultural information 2 Cultural Information

6 This text is a piece of narrative writing, in which the author tells about her experience during the first year at university, which at first seems to be very awkward but turns out to be on the right track at last. Global Reading - Structural analysis Rhetorical FeaturesStructural Analysis

7 Structural analysis the first is about her going into the wrong classroom; the second is about her falling down in the cafeteria; the last is about her witnessing the same embarrassing fall happening to someone admired by her. In the text, three incidents are narrated by the author: Despite the differences between these three incidents, they actually revolve around one theme: The growth of the author, who is able to draw lessons from the mistakes she has made and finally succeeds in adjusting herself to the college life. Rhetorical FeaturesStructural Analysis

8 Rhetorical Features 1 Detailed descriptions of events are everywhere to be seen in this text, which is a dominant feature of narrative writing. Since the description of an event will involve a lot of movements or actions, compound sentences and compound-complex sentences have been used frequently in the text. I first began to wonder what I was doing on a college campus anyway when my parents drove off, leaving me standing pitifully in a parking lot, wanting nothing more than to find my way safely to my dorm room. (Paragraph 1) Rhetorical FeaturesStructural Analysis e.g.

9 Rhetorical Features 2 I settled into my chair and tried to assume the scientific pose of a biology major, bending slightly forward, tensing my arms in preparation for furious note-taking, and cursing under my breath. (Paragraph 5) Rhetorical FeaturesStructural Analysis e.g.

10 Detailed reading 1 Detailed Reading Fresh Start Evelyn Herald 1 I first began to wonder what I was doing on a college campus anyway when my parents drove off, leaving me standing pitifully in a parking lot, wanting nothing more than to find my way safely to my dorm room. The fact was that no matter how mature I liked to consider myself, I was feeling just a bit first-gradish. Adding to my distress was the distinct impression that everyone on campus was watching me. My plan was to keep my ears open and my mouth shut and hope no one would notice I was a freshman.

11 Detailed reading2 2 With that thought in mind, I raised my head, squared my shoulders, and set out in the direction of my dorm, glancing (and then ever so discreetly) at the campus map clutched in my hand. It took everything I had not to stare when I caught my first glimpse of a real live college football player. What confidence, what reserve, what muscles! I only hoped his attention was drawn to my air of assurance rather than to my shaking knees. I spent the afternoon seeking out each of my classrooms so that I could make a perfectly timed entrance before each lecture without having to ask dumb questions about its whereabouts. Detailed Reading

12 Detailed reading3-4 3 The next morning I found my first class and marched in. Once I was in the room, however, another problem awaited me. Where to sit? Freshmen manuals advised sitting near the front, showing the professor in intelligent and energetic demeanor. After deliberation, I chose a seat in the first row and to the side. I was in the foreground (as advised ), but out of the professor’s direct line of vision. 4 I cracked my anthology of American literature and scribbled the date at the top of a crisp ruled page. “Welcome to Biology 101,” the professor began. A cold sweat broke out on the back of my neck. I groped for my schedule and checked the room number. I was in the right room. Just the wrong building. Detailed Reading

13 Detailed reading5 5 So now what? Get up and leave in the middle of the lecture? Wouldn’t the professor be angry? I knew everyone would stare. Forget it. I settled into my chair and tried to assume the scientific pose of a biology major, bending slightly forward, tensing my arms in preparation for furious notetaking, and cursing under my breath. The bottled snakes along the wall should have tipped me off. Detailed Reading

14 Detailed reading6 6 After class I decided my stomach (as well as my ego) needed a little nourishment, and I hurried to the cafeteria. I piled my tray with sandwich goodies and was heading for the salad bar when I accidentally stepped in a large puddle of ketchup. Keeping myself upright and getting out of the mess was not going to be easy, and this flailing of my feet was doing no good. Just as I decided to try another maneuver, my food tray tipped and I lost my balance. As my rear end met the floor, I saw my entire life pass before my eyes: it ended with my first day of college classes. Detailed Reading

15 Detailed reading7 7 In the seconds after my fall I thought how nice it would be if no one had noticed. But as all the students in the cafeteria came to their feet, table by table, cheering and clapping, I knew they had not only noticed, they were determined that I would never forget it. Slowly I kicked off my ketchup-soaked sandals and jumped clear of the toppled tray and spilled food. A cleanup brigade came charging out of the kitchen, mops in hands. I sneaked out of the cafeteria as the cheers died down behind me. Detailed Reading

16 Detailed reading8 8 For three days I dined alone on nothing more than humiliation, shame, and an assortment of junk food from a machine strategically placed outside my room. On the fourth day I couldn’t take another crunchy-chewy-salty- sweet bite. I needed some real food. Perhaps three days was long enough for the campus population to have forgotten me. So off to the cafeteria I went. Detailed Reading

17 Detailed reading9 9 I made my way through the food line and tiptoed to a table, where I collapsed in relief. Suddenly I heard a crash that sounded vaguely familiar. I looked up to see that another poor soul had met the fate that I’d thought was reserved for only me. I was even more surprised when I saw who the poor soul was: the very composed, very upper class football player I’d seen just days before (though he didn’t look quite so composed wearing spaghetti on the front of his shirt). My heart went out to him as people began to cheer and clap as they had for me. He got up, hands held high above his head in a victory clasp, grinning from ear to ear. I expected him to slink out of the cafeteria as I had, but instead he turned around and began preparing another tray. And that’s when I realized I had been taking myself far too seriously. Detailed Reading

18 Detailed reading10 10 What I had interpreted as a malicious attempt to embarrass a naïve freshman had been merely a moment of college fun. Probably everyone in the cafeteria had done something equally dumb when he or she was a freshman — and had lived to tell about it. 11 Who cared whether I dropped a tray, where I sat in class, or even whether I showed up in the wrong lecture? Nobody. This wasn’t like high school. Popularity was not so important; running with the crowd was no longer a law of survival. In college, it didn’t matter. This was my big chance to do my own thing, be my own woman — if I could get past my preoccupation with doing everything perfectly. Detailed Reading

19 Detailed reading11 12 Once I recognized that I had no one’s expectations to live up to but my own, I relaxed. The shackles of self- consciousness fell away, and I began to view college as a wonderful experiment. I tried on new experiences like articles of clothing, checking their fit and judging their worth. I broke a few rules to test my conscience. I dressed a little differently until I found the Real Me. I discovered a taste for jazz, and I decided I liked going barefoot. 13 I gave up trying to act my way through college (this wasn’t drama school) and began not acting at all. College, I decided, was probably the only time I would be completely forgiven for massive mistakes (including stepping in puddles of ketchup and dropping food trays). So I used the opportunity to make all the ones I thought I’d never make. Detailed Reading

20 Detailed reading12 14 Three years after graduation, I’m still making mistakes. And I’m even being forgiven for a few. Detailed Reading

21 Why did the author have the impression that “everyone on campus was watching me”? Detailed reading1--Quesion The author, being over-sensitive, was uneasy with her identity as a freshman. She thought a new student would attract others’ attention, as what she did or said was liable to be too naïve to be right. That feeling is a typical symptom of lacking in self-confidence. Detailed Reading

22 Why did the author exclaim “What confidence, what reserve, what muscles!” when she saw the football player? Detailed reading2--Quesion College life was a new experience to the author. That she marveled at the real football player showed her excitement about her new life. And more importantly, her response revealed her admiration of an image which was almost exactly the opposite of her own. This admiration would later become the motivation of her change. Detailed Reading

23 How many questions are used in Paragraphs 3, 4 and 5? Why does the author raise these questions? Detailed reading3-5-- Quesion Four elliptical questions are used in these paragraphs. Being a freshman, the author was not well acquainted with campus life. She was at a loss as to what to do when something unexpected happened. These questions are used to show her bewilderment. Detailed Reading

24 Why did she dine on junk food for the next three days? Detailed reading6-8-- Quesion Because she thought she had become the laughing- stock on campus. She couldn’t stand being laughed at by all the students when she turned up in the cafeteria. Detailed Reading

25 What was the key lesson Evelyn Herald learned during her first few weeks in college? Detailed reading Quesion The key lesson she learned during her first few weeks in college was that she realized she didn’t have to pay too much attention to what other people were thinking about her. The fresh campus life was her big chance to do her own things and be her own person. She might well relax herself and stop worrying about making mistakes because people all grow by trial and error. Detailed Reading

26 Detailed reading1– Activity Class Activity Group discussion: What lessons have you learned from Evelyn’s experiences after reading the article “Fresh Start”? Share the experiences when you first came to college. Detailed Reading

27 distinct a. clearly seen, heard, felt, understood, etc.; noticeable Detailed reading1– distinct1 e.g. Now that the boss was no longer present, there was a distinct change in her attitude. The children have distinct memories of their grandfather in his last days. Comparison:distinct & distinctive distinctive: It means having a special quality, character, or appearance that is different and easy to recognize. e.g.There is a distinct smell of beer in this room. distinct: Something that is distinct can clearly be seen, heard, smelled, etc. e.g. Beer has a very distinctive smell; it’s quite distinct from the smell of wine. Detailed Reading

28 Detailed reading1– distinct2 One of the features of this book is its illustrations. 本书特点之一就是具有清楚明了的图解。 distinctive ____________ distinct _________ Practice: Detailed Reading

29 clutch vt. hold or grasp vi. try to grasp or seize Detailed reading2– clutch e.g. The frightened woman clutched her bags to her breast. He clutched at the rope we had thrown to him but could not reach it. Synonyms: seize, grasp e.g. She seized my arm as she fell. grasp the essence / main points Detailed Reading

30 Detailed reading2-- glimpse glimpse n. 1. a quick look at sb. or sth. e.g.I caught a glimpse of our new neighbor. 2. a short experience of sth. that helps you begin to understand it e.g. Her worried face gave me a glimpse of her true feelings. 她的忧伤表情使我感受到她内心的真实感情。 Detailed Reading

31 Detailed reading2-- reserve reserve n. a quality in sb.’s character that make them not like expressing their emotions or talking about their problems e.g. Being a man of reserve, Mr. York was never popular with his colleagues. Judy has tried every means to break through the reserve of her stepson. Derivation: reserved a. e.g.The English have a reputation for being reserved. Detailed Reading

32 Detailed reading2-- whereabouts whereabouts n. approximate location ad. used to ask in what general area sth. or sb. is e.g. The orphan’s whereabouts is / are still unknown. The police have appealed for information concerning the whereabouts of the stolen car used in the robbery. Whereabouts did you grow up? Detailed Reading

33 Detailed reading3-- demeanor demeanor n. the way sb. behaves, dresses, speaks, etc. that shows what their character is like Practice: 他的举止沉着、稳健。 His demeanor was clam and steady. 这个女孩子的态度娴静而谦逊。 The girl has a quiet, modest demeanor. Detailed Reading

34 Detailed reading3-- scribble scribble (down) v. write sth. quickly and untidily e.g. I scribbled his phone number in my address book. He scribbled down our names. Detailed Reading

35 Detailed reading3-- grope grope v. 1. try to find sth. that you cannot see by feeling with your hands e.g.Ginny groped for her glasses on the bedside table. Collocations: grope for grope around e.g.We groped around in the darkness. 2. go somewhere by feeling the way with your hands because you cannot see e.g.I was groping my way blindly through the trees. Collocations: grope your way along / across, etc. Detailed Reading

36 tip off give an advanced warning or hint to Detailed reading5– tip off e.g. Somebody must have tipped the burglars off that the house would be empty. The police was tipped off about the robbery. Detailed Reading

37 Detailed reading6– goody goody (pl. goodies) n. 1. sth. that is nice to eat e.g. We bought lots of goodies for the picnic. e.g. The competition gives you the chance to win all sorts of goodies. Variant spelling: (British English) goodie 2. sth. attractive, pleasant, or desirable Detailed Reading

38 Detailed reading6–flail I flailed my arms to get her attention. The baby’s feet flailed under the quilt. e.g. flail v. (cause sth. to) wave or swing about wildly Detailed Reading

39 Detailed reading6– rear end rear end (informal) the part of your body which you sit on Detailed Reading

40 Detailed reading7– sneak sneak v. go somewhere secretly and quietly in order to avoid being seen or heard e.g. They sneaked off without paying! She snuck out of the house once her parents were asleep. Collocations: sneak in / out / away / off Synonym: creep Detailed Reading

41 Detailed reading8–crunchy- chewy-salty-sweet bite Word formation: The four adjectives are chained up with hyphens to form a new modifier placed before a noun. crunchy-chewy-salty-sweet bite Here the modifier “crunchy-chewy-salty-sweet” describes the texture and taste of the fast food, which is crunchy, chewy, salty and sweet. e.g. a red-hot news story an all-round athlete Detailed Reading

42 Detailed reading9– tiptoe tiptoe v. walk quietly and carefully on your toes, so that nobody hears you e.g. His mother tiptoed into the room. I tiptoed along the corridor. Collocation: tiptoe around (sth.): try to avoid dealing with a difficult or embarrassing subject or problem e.g. They were tiptoeing around the delicate subject of money. Detailed Reading

43 poor (old) soul used to show pity for sb. Detailed reading9– poor (old) soul e.g.The poor old soul had fallen and broken her hip. Detailed Reading

44 Detailed reading9– spaghetti tagliatelle 意大利干面条 a type of pasta that is cut into very long thin flat pieces spaghetti 意大利式细面条 a type of pasta in very long thin pieces, that is cooked in boiling water macaroni 通心粉 a type of pasta in the shape of small tubes Detailed Reading

45 Detailed reading9-- go out to sb. go out to sb. used to say that someone feels a lot of sympathy towards another person e.g. His heart went out to Mrs. Bradshaw and her fatherless child. Detailed Reading

46 Detailed reading9–grin grin v. show that you are very happy or pleased by smiling widely Collocation: grin from ear to ear: grin very widely Detailed Reading

47 Detailed reading9–slink slink v. go or move in a quiet, stealthy way; move as if one feels guilty or ashamed, or does not want to be seen e.g. She tried to slink (=sneak) out of the office so that nobody would see her. The cat slunk (=sneaked) through the grass toward its prey. Detailed Reading

48 Detailed reading10– malicious malicious a. very unkind and cruel, and deliberately behaving in a way that is likely to upset or hurt sb. e.g. a malicious remark malicious gossip Derivation : malice (n.): a desire to harm sb. because you hate them e.g. He did it through malice. I am quite certain that his wife bears malice to / towards / against (=feels continuing dislike for) me. Detailed Reading

49 Detailed reading10–run with the crowd Comparison and translation run with the crowd An independent man, Peter never goes with the tide. 彼得是个有主见的人,从不随大流。 __________________________________________________________ You can do what you want to do, but never follow the crowd. 你想做什么就做什么,可别随大流。 __________________________________________________________ Hait hasn’t got a mind of his own on any matter of importance; he just swims with the tide. 海特在任何重要问题上都没有自己的主见,他只是随大流。 __________________________________________________________________________________ She is always falling into line with the majority. 她总是随大流。 ___________________________ Detailed Reading

50 Detailed reading11– shackle shackle n. a metal fastening, usually one of a pair, for encircling and confining the ankle or wrist of a prisoner or captive; (fig.) a restraint or check to action or progress, often used in the plural form The policeman placed shackles on the suspect’s hands. It is hard to break through the shackles of habit. e.g. Detailed Reading

51 Detailed reading1– It took everything … It took everything I had not to stare when I caught my first glimpse of a real live college football player. (Paragraph 2) Paraphrase: I could not help staring at the football player who was a direct contrast to myself and represented what I had desired but failed to be. Detailed Reading

52 Detailed reading3– I was in … I was in the foreground. (Paragraph 3) Paraphrase: Foreground means, as opposite to background, the part of a scene, landscape, etc. nearest, or represented in perspective as nearest, to the viewer, or the most noticeable or conspicuous position. Detailed Reading

53 Detailed reading9– I made my way … I made my way through the food line and tiptoed to a table, where I collapsed in relief. (Paragraph 9) Explanation: What she meant is that she sat down in relief as no one had noticed her. “Collapsed” is a hyperbole indicating her anxiety and the contrasting reality that no one actually cared. Detailed Reading

54 Detailed reading10– Probably… Probably everyone in the cafeteria had done something equally dumb when he or she was a freshman — and had lived to tell about it. (Paragraph 10) Paraphrase: Everyone who had done something dumb had survived the embarrassment (and so was able to recount the experience afterwards). Detailed Reading

55 Detailed reading11– I dressed a little … I dressed a little differently until I found the Real Me. (Paragraph 12) Explanation: Metaphorically, she means that she tried different experiences, as if trying on different articles of clothing, until she finally determined what her life should be like. Detailed Reading

56 Consolidation Activities- Vocabulary main Phrase Practice Word Derivation Synonym / Antonym VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar

57 4) Our sympathies the relatives of the victims. Consolidation Activities- Phrase practice 1 1) You have to take your daughter to hospital, as a rash on her face and hands. VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar has broken out _________________ 2) In the darkness, I the right box. groped for ____________ 3) I warned him repeatedly that it was no good that kind of tricks me. trying ________ on ____ go out to __________ Fill in the blank in each sentence with an appropriate phrasal verb or collocation from the text.

58 Consolidation Activities- Phrase practice 2 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 5) The drug traffickers were arrested after the police were by the local residents. tipped off ___________

59 Consolidation Activities- break out VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar e.g. 印度尼西亚爆发了森林火灾。 Forest fires have broken out across Indonesia. break out: (of war, fighting, disease, or similarly undesirable things) start suddenly

60 Consolidation Activities- grope for VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar e.g. 我在黑洞洞的屋里摸索着寻找电灯开关。 I grope for the light switch in the dark room. grope for: feel or search about uncertainly (for something) by hands; search uncertainly or with difficulty (for a solution, answer, etc.)

61 Consolidation Activities- try on VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar e.g. 你可以试试这件新上衣。 人们为什么热衷于摸彩票? You can try on this new coat. try on: put on (an article of clothing) to find out whether it fits or is suitable; test the effect or result of Why do people like to try their luck on lottery?

62 Consolidation Activities- go out to sb. VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar e.g. 他非常同情布莱克曼夫人和她那没有父亲的孩子。 His heart went out to Mrs. Blackman and her fatherless child. go out to sb.: feel sympathy towards sb. and think about them

63 Consolidation Activities- tip off VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar e.g. 他向警察告密,揭露了恐怖分子的阴谋。 He tipped off the police about the terrorist plot. tip off: give an advance warning or hint to …

64 Consolidation Activities- Word derivation 1.1 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 1) assurance n. → assure v. → assuring a. e.g. 她向我们保证一切都会好起来的。 他的安慰话帮我排除了恐惧。 She gave us her assurance that everything would turn out all right. or She assured us that everything would turn out all right. His assuring words helped to banish my fear.

65 Consolidation Activities- Word derivation 1.2 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 2) discreet a. → discreetly ad. → discretion / discreetness n. e.g. 提出忠告要谨慎,接受忠告要虚心。 那人小心翼翼地把名片放进上衣口袋。 他以最谨慎的态度处理此事。 You need to be discreet in giving advice, humble in accepting it. The man discreetly slipped the card into his top pocket. He handled the matter with his best discretion.

66 Consolidation Activities- Word derivation 1.3 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 3) relax v. → relaxing a. → relaxation n. e.g. 你可以通过按摩来放松肌肉。 业余爱好应该是可以使人放松的。 瑜伽是一种可以使身心放松的运动。 You can relax your muscles by massage. Hobbies are supposed to be relaxing. Yoga is an exercise that can provide mental and physical relaxation.

67 Consolidation Activities- Word derivation 1.4 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 4) humiliation n. → humiliate v. → humiliating a. e.g. 士可杀不可辱。 他在老板面前批评他的同事,因而让同事蒙羞。 历史上中国曾被迫签署了太多屈节辱国的条约。 A scholar prefers death to humiliation. He humiliated his colleague by criticising him in front of the boss. In history, China has been forced to sign too many humiliating treaties.

68 Consolidation Activities- Word derivation 1.5 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 5) strategically ad. → strategic a. → strategy n. e.g. 在战略上,我们应该藐视一切敌人。 一般而言,首先参战的那方具有战略优势。 西部大开发战略吸引了全世界的注意。 Strategically we should despise all our enemies. The large-scale development strategy for the western region drew worldwide attention. Generally, the first to the field of battle has the strategic advantage.

69 He spared the embarrassment of kissing her in front of everybody. Consolidation Activities- Word derivation 1.6 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 6) embarrass v. → embarrassing a. → embarrassment n. e.g. 他淘气地寻找机会让他姐姐难堪。 每个人都会遇到不知该给服务生多少小费的窘境。 他避免了在众人面前吻她的尴尬。 He mischievously looked for a chance to embarrass his sister. Everyone has faced the embarrassing dilemma of deciding how much extra to give a waiter.

70 Consolidation Activities- Word derivation 1.7 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 7) maneuver v./n. → maneuverable a. e.g. 他设法跻身董事会。 在军事演习中,蓝军企图摸营,被红军挫败。 这艘船的大小适中,可操作性很强。 He maneuvered himself into the board of directors. In the military maneuver, the blue army attempted to attack the red army’s sentinels in the dark, but was defeated. The ship is of an appropriate size and is highly maneuverable.

71 The fruits, mature or immature, can be conserved with sugar. Consolidation Activities- Word derivation 1.8 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 8) mature a. → maturity n. e.g. 她是位成熟的夫人,但显得年轻而且异乎寻常地美丽。 她到十六岁发育成熟。 不管熟还是没有熟的水果,都可以用糖来保存。 She was a mature woman, but appeared young and was extraordinarily beautiful. She had reached maturity by the time she was sixteen. Antonym: immature a. → immaturity n.

72 carefully, meticulously Consolidation Activities- Synonym / Antonym1 1. Adding to my distress was the distinct impression that everyone on campus was watching me. Antonyms:vague, indistinct 2. With that thought in mind, I raised my head, squared my shoulders, and set out in the direction of my dorm, glancing (and then ever so discreetly) at the campus map clutched in my hand. Synonyms: VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar

73 Consolidation Activities- Synonym / Antonym2 3. What confidence, what reserve, what muscles! Synonyms:self-restraint, self-control 4. I spent the afternoon seeking out each of my classrooms so that I could make a perfectly timed entrance before each lecture without having to ask dumb questions about its whereabouts. Antonyms : clever, intelligent, sensible VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar

74 Consolidation Activities- Synonym / Antonym3 5. Freshmen manuals advised sitting near the front, showing the professor in intelligent and energetic demeanor. Synonyms:manner, behaviour 6. I was even more surprised when I saw who the poor soul was: the very composed, very upper class football player I’d seen just days before … Antonyms:excited, agitated VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 7. I expected him to slink out of the cafeteria as I had, but instead he turned around and began preparing another tray. Synonym:sneak

75 Consolidation Activities- Synonym / Antonym4 8. What I had interpreted as a malicious attempt to embarrass a naive freshman had been merely a moment of college fun. Antonyms:mature, sophisticated VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar

76 Consolidation Activities- Grammar main VocabularyGrammarTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWriting Nominal Clauses so that Adverbial Clauses of Concession

77 Consolidation Activities- Grammar1.1 1) Nominal Clauses There are five main types of nominal clauses: that- clauses, interrogative sub-clauses, nominal relative clauses, nominal to-infinitive clauses and nominal -ing clauses. Nominal clauses function like noun phrases. They can occur as subject, object, complement, apposition, and prepositional complement. VocabularyGrammarTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWriting

78 Consolidation Activities- Grammar1.2 VocabularyGrammarTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWriting e.g. The hope is [that we will succeed]. (complement) The hope [that we will succeed] is unrealistic. (apposition) [What you do] does not concern me. (subject) I didn’t ask [where you live]. (object) I had prepared myself very carefully for [what I must say]. (prepositional complement) [To send him money now] would be [to put the cart before the horse]. (subject; complement)

79 Consolidation Activities- Grammar1.4 Practice Combine each pair of sentences into one, using nominal clauses. VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 1. Did he ever go there at all? Do you know? Do you know if/whether he ever went there at all? 2. What do you need? You need a good rest. What you need is a good rest. 3. Who does it belong to? You must give it back. You must give it back to whoever it belongs to.

80 Consolidation Activities- Grammar1.6 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 4. I decided to resign, which was wise. My decision to resign was wise. 5. It is proposed that we should import more equipment. The proposal is to be discussed at the meeting. The proposal that we should import more equipment is to be discussed at the meeting. 6. Who can have told you that? It puzzles me. Who can have told you that puzzles me.

81 Consolidation Activities- Grammar2.1 2) so that VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar So that introduces an adverbial clause of purpose, which usually contains a modal verb. The teacher must speak clearly [so that his students can understand well]. They climbed to the top of the mountain [so that they could get a bird’s-eye view of the city]. e.g.

82 Consolidation Activities- Grammar2.2 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Practice 1. He wore glasses and a false beard. Nobody would recognize him. Combine each pair of sentences into one, using “so that”. He wore glasses and a false beard so that nobody would recognize him. 2. They are hurrying. They don’t want to miss the train. They are hurrying so that they may not miss the train. 3. Please arrive early. We want to be able to start the meeting on time Please arrive early so that we can start the meeting on time.

83 Consolidation Activities- Grammar2.3 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 4. John wanted to be heard in every room. He spoke through a microphone. John spoke through a microphone so that he could be heard in every room. 5. She locked the door. She didn’t want to be disturbed. She locked the door so that she wouldn’t be disturbed. 6. John has bought a bicycle. He may save money on fares. John has bought a bicycle so that he may save money on fares.

84 [Although the car was badly damaged], none of the passengers was hurt. We enjoyed our holiday [despite the fact that it rained sometimes]. [However difficult the situation is], we shall stick to it. Consolidation Activities- Grammar3.1 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 3) Adverbial Clauses of Concession Adverbial clauses of concession express a contrast of meaning or implication of “unexpectedness” in relation with the main clauses. They are often introduced by concessive conjunctions such as although, though or prepositions such as despite. e.g.

85 Consolidation Activities- Grammar3.2 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Practice Combine each pair of sentences into one, using adverbial clauses of concession. 1. He had been prevented by illness from studying. He passed the exam. He passed the exam although he had been prevented by illness from studying. 2. He might be or not be here. I shouldn’t have time to see him. No matter whether he was here or not, I shouldn’t have time to see him.

86 Consolidation Activities- Grammar3.3 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 3. Mr. Johnson is rich. Mr. Johnson is by no means a happy man. Rich as he is / Although he is rich, Mr. Johnson is by no means a happy man. 4. He is ill. He works hard. Despite / Although he is ill, he works hard. 5. The minister escaped without a scratch. Everything around the minister was blown to pieces. Though everything around him was blown to pieces, the minister escaped without a scratch.

87 Consolidation Activities- Translation1 1. 听到他屡遭失败的消息,我感到很难过。 (distress) If you distress someone, you upset them by doing or saying something that causes them to feel unhappy or alarmed. VocabularyGrammarTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWriting Translate the following sentences into English. It distressed me a great deal to hear the news that he had suffered repeated failures.

88 Consolidation Activities- Translation2 Practice : 如果我问了你的这一切使你感到苦恼,我很抱歉。 请不要自寻烦恼。 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar I’m sorry if I’ve distressed you by asking all this. Please don’t distress yourself.

89 Consolidation Activities- Translation3 2. 他虽然失去了老板的欢心,但仍然装出一副高兴的样子。 (assume) VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar If you assume a particular expression or way of behaving, you look or behave in this way deliberately in order to give people a particular impression. He assumed an air for cheerfulness, even though he lost favor with his boss.

90 Consolidation Activities- Translation4 Practice : 文职官员们装出一副军人的样子。 他装出一副悔过的样子。 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Civil servants assume a certain military air. He assumed an expression of penitence.

91 Consolidation Activities- Translation5 3. 如果你再犯同样的错误,他会对你非常生气的。 (furious) VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar When you are furious with / at sb. or sth., you are extremely angry or annoyed with him / at it. He will be furious with you if you repeat the same mistake.

92 Consolidation Activities- Translation6 Practice : 他为没有更早明白这件事而对自己非常生气。 他因为她所做的事情而大发雷霆。 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar He was furious with himself for not realizing it sooner. He was furious with her at what she had done.

93 Consolidation Activities- Translation7 4. 我们都被他的坦率的观点、幽默的语言和亲切的态度所 深深吸引。 (draw) VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar If something draws you, it is so interesting or noticeable that you look at it or move towards it. We were all greatly drawn by his frank views, humorous words and genial manner.

94 The Hollywood blockbuster has used many big stars to draw a large audience. Consolidation Activities- Translation8 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Practice : 收音机的声音吸引了孩子们的注意。 这部好莱坞大片为了吸引大批观众,动用了许多大牌明星。 The noise of the radio drew the children.

95 Consolidation Activities- Translation7 5. 等到欢呼的掌声平息下来,那位诺贝尔奖获得者开始演 讲。 (die down) VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar If something dies down, it becomes very much quieter or less intense. After the cheering applause died down, the Nobel Prize winner began his speech.

96 The gossip will soon die down now that the woman is dead. Consolidation Activities- Translation8 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Practice : 她等到笑声渐渐停止。 既然这名妇女已经死了,这些闲言碎语也将很快消失。 She waited until the laughter had died down.

97 Consolidation Activities- Translation7 6. 我发现现实毕竟是非常严酷的,一个人难以完全按照自 己的理想去生活。 (live up to) VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar If someone or something lives up to what they were expected or desired to be or do, they are as good as they were expected or desired to be. I feel realities are after all very harsh, so one can hardly live up entirely to his ideals.

98 You have failed to live up to your promises. Consolidation Activities- Translation8 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Practice : 这部电影没有我期望的那么好。 你没能实现自己的诺言。 The film didn’t live up to my expectations.

99 Consolidation Activities- Integrated skills VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Dictation Cloze

100 Consolidation Activities- Dictation VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Dictation You will hear a passage read three times. At the first reading, you should listen carefully for its general idea. At the second reading, you are required to write down the exact words you have just heard (with proper punctuation). At the third reading, you should check what you have written down.

101 Consolidation Activities- Integrated skills1 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Dictation There are generally two educational methods: / the lecture method and the group learning method. / In a lecture classroom, / the teacher dominates the class / by doing most of the talking. / Students listen and take notes. / This method is best at passing on content to students. / It prepares students for a society / that values discipline and self-control. / The problem is that students forget most of the facts / that they have mechanically memorized. / In contrast, / the teacher of a group learning classroom / appears to have no definite

102 Consolidation Activities- Integrated skills2 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar role at all, / wandering about from group to group. / Students do not memorise information, / but they actively generate their own ideas, / each contributing insights for the success of the group. / This method prepares students for a society / that values creative ideas. / The disadvantage is that / students have not memorised enough basic facts.

103 Consolidation Activities- Integrated skills3 Fill in each blank in the passage below with ONE word you think appropriate. Academic success (1) in many forms. For most students, it’s a stellar transcript that opens doors into great jobs or great graduate schools. For (2), academic success also includes (3) happens outside of the classroom. With so much (4) on in college, though, how can you make sure you’re headed down a path toward true academic success — and toward a truly rewarding college experience? comes _______ others _______ what _______ VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar going _______

104 You may arrive at college knowing that you are destined to become a teacher, a lawyer, a doctor, or an engineer. Or you may arrive (5) having the slightest idea about what you want to major in. No matter which end of the spectrum you’re on, however, you should let yourself explore everything that your school has to (6) academically. Take classes in a subject you’ve never taken before. Follow a passion that doesn’t (7) to your major. Just let yourself really learn from your environment. There will undoubtedly be a lot of people giving you advice about what you should do during and after (8). Consolidation Activities- Integrated skills4 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar not ____ offer ______ college ________ relate _______

105 And while you may be in school to learn, you will, at some point, have to draw your own line in the sand. Pick a career and course of study that suits you, (9) your parents. Pay attention to the fire in your belly and learn what you’re truly passionate about. Make sure you’re happy at your school. And once you’ve made a choice, feel confident in your decision and do all you can to (10) from the resources around you. Consolidation Activities- Integrated skills5 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar not ____ learn ______

106 Consolidation Activities- Hints1 This sentence lacks a predicate of intransitive verb, meaning “to happen” or “to occur”. VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar

107 Consolidation Activities- Hints2 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar After for most students, here an echoing structure is naturally expected.

108 Consolidation Activities- Hints3 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Grammatically speaking, in this sentence, includes needs an object whereas happens outside the classroom at the same time requires for a subject. In terms of the meaning, it can be inferred from the context as “academic success also includes the thing that happens outside the classroom”. A pronoun, which leads an object clause and functions as “the thing that”, is required here.

109 Consolidation Activities- Hints4 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Here following with so much, a noun or gerund is expected. In college is a separate phrase, leaving on pending to combine with the previous missing word, which hints at a phrase that means a lot of things are taking place or happening.

110 Consolidation Activities- Hints5 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar You may arrive at college knowing something, “or” you may arrive not knowing anything. Or here strongly suggests a contrast in meaning, which is also suggested by the following expression end of the spectrum you are on. In the meantime, the slightest often collocates with negations, and not to have the slightest idea is a natural expression to mean “to have no idea”. Here, before the –ing participle having, a word of negation is expected.

111 Consolidation Activities- Hints6 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar After the infinitive marker “to”, the basic form of a verb is naturally expected. “That” leads in an attributive clause to modify “everything”, which serves as the object of this verb. The next sentence indicates an antonym of “take” is required here.

112 Consolidation Activities- Hints7 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar This sentence further illustrates the previous sentence Take classes in a subject you’ve never taken before. Naturally, the passion and your major should not be related. After “doesn’t”, the basic form of a verb is naturally expected. And it must be able to collocate with “to”.

113 Consolidation Activities- Hints8 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar After the two prepositions during and after, a noun or gerund is needed. The whole passage talks about life in college. It can be inferred from the context that the advice people give you concerns with your life during and after college.

114 Consolidation Activities- Hints9 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar How to draw your own line in the sand? The next sentence should further explain this idea and “your own line” stresses the contrast between your own decision and your parents’ choice. So a negation is naturally expected here.

115 Consolidation Activities- Hints10 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Judging from the context and the logic of the passage, this sentence echoes the repeated message in the previous part, e.g. “Just let yourself really learn from your environment”. After the infinitive marker “to”, the basic form of a verb is naturally expected.

116 Consolidation Activities- Oral activities VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Giving a Talk Having a Discussion

117 busy / idle, great professors, a big campus, diversified courses, fewer exams, first experience of romantic love, a wide spectrum of extra-curricular activities, part-time jobs Consolidation Activities- Oral activities1 Topic A: How I Started My College Life Topic B: My Idea of What College Life Should Be Like VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar freshman, orientation week, campus tour, placement tests, oral interviews for admission to different students’ societies, chaos, excitement, homesickness Words and phrases for reference : Words and phrases for reference:

118 Consolidation Activities- Having a discussion Having a Discussion Topic: Do you believe that one can live a perfect life without making any mistake? VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Viewpoints for reference: a. To be a better self is far more important than to be perfect for everything. b. The idea of living a perfect life urges us to be a better self.

119 a definable beginning, middle and ending; a central idea (or the thesis) descriptive, narrative, expositive, persuasive (or argumentative) Consolidation Activities- Writing main VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar Essay Writing 1. An Introduction Different kinds of essays: Structural features:

120 Consolidation Activities- Writing1 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar What makes a good essay: Task ResponseCoherence and Cohesion Lexical Resource Grammatical Range and Accuracy Fully and appropriately explain / prove / discuss the thesis with clear, relevant and well-supported ideas in required length Information and ideas are well organized, presented and linked A wide range of vocabulary used in an accurate and appropriate manner for the task A wide range of structures used in an accurate and appropriate manner for the task

121 Consolidation Activities- Writing3 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar 2. Sample Why King’s College? ① This paragraph will explain why I am going to King’s College. ② The first reason I go to KC is that it is small. ③ The classes are easy to get to on time, and if I have to run to the library, I can get there quickly. ④ Second, KC is located in a small town. ⑤ I can walk anywhere I want to go. ⑥ Third, the cost of going to KC is low, and most of the books are checked out to the students in the library. ⑦ Fourth, the instructors are friendly and easy to find during their office hours. ⑧ This paragraph has explained why I am attending King’s College. Sample Analysis

122 Consolidation Activities- Writing4 VocabularyTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWritingGrammar The sample is a one-paragraph essay. Sentence ① constitutes the beginning of the essay and also serves as its thesis. Sentences ② - ⑦ are supporting ideas and make up its body. Sentence ⑧ is the end of this essay and reiterates its main idea.

123 Consolidation Activities- Writing5 VocabularyGrammarTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWriting 3. Practice Write a one-paragraph essay on the given topic: Why I Kept ________ as My Pet.

124 Consolidation Activities- Writing6 VocabularyGrammarTranslationIntegrated SkillsOral ActivitiesWriting Why I Kept a Cat as My Pet Most people choose to keep cats as their pets for some similar reasons. First and foremost, I think cats are cute. I love to see my cat mewing to be fed. And it seems cats can do a lot of things with their body. They curl up and bury their face when they sleep. They arch their back in a frightened and defensive mode. And even fashion models try to imitate “cat’s walk”. Second, cats are clean animals. They do a tidy-up after they eat. They can be trained to use cat litter when they have to pee and shit indoors. Third, cats are better than dogs in a sense that you don’t have to walk them, which can save me a lot of trouble. Keeping pets can be a rather personal choice and my first pet cat was given by my father as a birthday gift. Example:

125 Section Five Further Enhancement Text IIMemorable Quotes Lead-in Questions Text Questions for Discussion

126 Lead-in Questions 1.How do you understand the purpose of a University? 2. What can corrupt a University’s soul? Lead-in questions Text IIMemorable Quotes e.g.Intellectual corruption: plagiarism. To train its recruits to be qualified for a job. To educate its students to be civilized citizens. To urge on knowledge seekers to pursue thought, wisdom and even truth. a. b. c.

127 A University Stands and Shines John Masefield 1 There are few earthly things more splendid than a University. In these days of broken frontiers and collapsing values, when the dams are down and the floods are making misery, when every future looks somewhat grim and every ancient foothold has become something of a quagmire, wherever a University stands, it stands and shines; wherever it exists, the free minds of men, urged on to full and fair enquiry, may still bring wisdom into human affairs. Text1 Text IIMemorable Quotes

128 Text2 Text IIMemorable Quotes There are few earthly things more beautiful than a University. It is a place where those who hate ignorance may strive to know, where those who perceive truth may strive to make others see; where seekers and learners alike, banded together in the search for knowledge, will honour thought in all its finer ways, will welcome thinkers in distress or in exile, will uphold ever the dignity of thought and learning and will exact standards in these things. They give to the young in their impressionable years, the bond of a lofty purpose shared, of a great corporate life whose links will not be loosed until they die. They give young people that close companionship for which youth longs, and that chance of the endless discussion of the themes which are endless, without which youth would seem a waste of time. 2

129 Text3 Text IIMemorable Quotes There are few things more enduring than a University. Religions may split into sect or heresy; dynasties may perish or be supplanted, but for century after century the University will continue, and the stream of life will pass through it, and the thinker and the seeker will be found together in the undying cause of bringing thought into the world. To be a member of one of these great Societies must ever be a glad distinction. In conferring it upon us you declare, or let it be presumed, that we are qualified to teach in those ways of life which we have followed. It has been a mark of the Humanist since he began among us that “gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche”; and although all of us would more gladly learn than teach, to be counted fit to teach is something of a crown to all men

130 Text4 Text IIMemorable Quotes On behalf of my fellows in this glory, on behalf of the very learned, valiant, wise and gifted men beside me here, who stand for the Law by which we live, the air by which we breathe, the Free Enquiry by which we hope to endure, and the Art by which we shall be remembered, I thank you for this great distinction, which links us with you while we last. 6

131 Text1 – About the author Text IIMemorable Quotes About the author: John Edward Masefield ( ) was an English poet and writer, and Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1930 until his death in He is remembered as the author of the classic children’s novels The Midnight Folk and The Box of Delights, 19 other novels (including Captain Margaret, Multitude and Solitude and Sard Harker), and many memorable poems, including “The Everlasting Mercy” and “Sea-Fever”, from his anthology Saltwater Ballads. The text was a speech delivered at the University of Sheffield on June 25, 1946, in response to a toast in his honor.

132 impressionable years (Paragraph 2): the years when the young are learning in a university and when they are most apt to learn and shape their personality Text2 – impressionable years Text IIMemorable Quotes

133 one of these great Societies (Paragraph 4) : It refers to a University which, according to the author, is most splendid, most beautiful and most enduring of all earthly things. Text4 one of these great … Text IIMemorable Quotes

134 Text3– gladly wolde … Text IIMemorable Quotes … gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche (Paragraph 5) : A quotation of Chaucer, it is a pedagogical advice from Geoffrey Chaucer, who in his Canterbury Tales describes the Clerk of Oxford thus: “Gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche.” The three operative words in that Middle English sentence from six hundred years ago are “gladly,” “learn,” and “teach.” What Chaucer meant was that without gladness — without joy — one can expect from the educative process only a little learning.

135 In these days of broken frontiers and collapsing values, when the dams are down and the floods are making misery, when every future looks somewhat grim and every ancient foothold has become something of a quagmire, wherever a University stands, it stands and shines … (Paragraph 1): Speaking metaphorically, Masefield is commenting on the reality of the time before and after World War II, and the human affairs that lack wisdom. Frontiers and dams represent restraints on human vices and, according to John Masefield, could be provided by human wisdom. Text1– In these days … Text IIMemorable Quotes

136 Text2- They give Text IIMemorable Quotes They give to the young in their impressionable years, the bond of a lofty purpose shared, of a great corporate life whose links will not be loosed until they die. (Paragraph 2): Professors will provide students, who are in the most vulnerable age and most apt for learning, both knowledge and enlightenment, and guide them in a noble direction.

137 Questions for discussion1 1. How do you understand the idea that a University is even more enduring than religions and dynasties? A University is even more enduring than religions and dynasties in that it is a place where the undying cause of bringing thought into the world is carried out. Text IIMemorable Quotes 2. The author maintains that “the thinker and the seeker will be found together in the undying cause of bringing thought into the world” (Paragraph 3). Cite a modern instance or two of thought brought into the world. Charles Darwin: theory of evolution; Albert Einstein: theory of relativity; Sigmund Freud: theory of psychoanalysis.

138 3. What is the Humanist? What do you think are the major marks of the Humanist? The Humanist is the man who believes in human intelligence and reason rather than depending on a god or religion. Some of the major marks are stress on intellectual side, the emphasis on human dignity, sufficient attention paid to the importance of the present life, and the improvement of one’s ability and the pursuit of the beauty of life. It may mean that it is an honor to be part of a University. 4. What is “this great distinction” the author mentions in the last but one line of the selection? Questions for discussion2 Text IIMemorable Quotes

139 5. Make an analysis of these few paragraphs and show four main points of the selection. Four main points of the selection could be that a University is splendid; it is beautiful; it is enduring; and it is an honor to be part of it. Questions for discussion3 Text IIMemorable Quotes

140 Memorable Quotes1 Text IIMemorable Quotes 1. Mistakes are the portals of discovery. — James Joyce

141 2. Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes. — Oscar Wilde Memorable Quotes3 Text IIMemorable Quotes

142 Questions for discussion1 Text IIMemorable Quotes Questions for Discussion 1) Discuss with your classmates some mistakes you’ll probably try to avoid on your journey through life and explain why. For example: I can not afford to choose a wrong career because I think it’ll be rather difficult for me to transfer from one line of work to another … Tip

143 For example: a. I believe choosing English as my major is a big mistake because my mother picked it for me. I gradually found out I was not interested in language study at all. Now I’ve learned the importance of making my own choice. b. The biggest mistake I’ve made so far is that I never allow myself to make any mistake. I feel much pressure from my perfectionism obsession. And I’ve lost some precious opportunities to achieve major breakthroughs in my university life because of this. Questions for discussion1 Text IIMemorable Quotes 2) Share with your classmates a mistake you’ve made in your life. And discuss with them what you’ve learned from it. Tip

144 Memorable Quotes1 Text IIMemorable Quotes James Joyce ( ) was an Irish novelist and poet of the early 20th century, best known for his landmark novel Ulysses (1922), a modern re-telling of The Odyssey.

145 Memorable Quotes1 Text IIMemorable Quotes Oscar Wilde ( ) was an Irish writer and poet, regarded as one of London’s most popular playwrights in the early 1890s, also a spokesman for aestheticism.

146 Notation type here


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