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Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education May 26, 2011 Hoagland-Pincus UMass Conference Center Academic Support Fiscal Year 2012 Grant.

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Presentation on theme: "Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education May 26, 2011 Hoagland-Pincus UMass Conference Center Academic Support Fiscal Year 2012 Grant."— Presentation transcript:

1 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education May 26, 2011 Hoagland-Pincus UMass Conference Center Academic Support Fiscal Year 2012 Grant Information Session 1

2 9-9:30 WELCOME & THANK YOU FOR COMING! THE PURPOSE OF THE PARTY ▫What’s New? Who’s New? Pause to reflect. Don’t let data scare you. Ask and share. HOT OFF THE PRESSES ▫FY10 MCAS support program participants were 28 percentage points more likely to have met the state's ELA and Mathematics MCAS testing requirements by November 2010 than eligible youth who did not participate. This difference also held true when looking at students by class year as well as by selected populations WHO ARE WE? WHO ARE YOU? Write, Walk, Talk … ▫Key ingredients to success & Recipe changes Details ▫Agenda… Handouts… Can I get some water? How was it? New Acronyms and what they have to do with Academic Support Programs ▫CCR & LSS 2

3 Learning Support Services (LSS) The LSS unit works in partnership with educators, schools, students, families, and other partners across the Commonwealth to advance the Department's mission. Our programs and initiatives promote a comprehensive and collaborative approach to developing all students' academic, social, emotional, and physical competencies. As students acquire these competencies, barriers to learning are reduced and student potential is maximized. Examples of LSS program strategies that cultivate student achievement and success include: ▫making data-informed decisions to address achievement and proficiency gaps, ▫infusing service learning, multi-disciplinary, and/or meaningful project based activities into curricula, ▫providing professional development and technical assistance for continuous program improvement, ▫engaging families/guardians in student learning, ▫creating safe and supportive learning environments, ▫fostering positive behavioral health, ▫supporting smooth transitions between grades and schools, and ▫promoting interagency and school/community collaboration. 3

4 LSS Programs Academic Support Bullying Prevention & Intervention Kindergarten Grants Out-of-School Time Programs ▫21st Century Community Learning Centers (21 st CCLC) - federally funded ▫After-School and Out-of-School Time (ASOST) – state-funded Safe & Healthy Learning Environments Service-Learning (SL) Contact Information ▫Rachelle Engler Bennett, LSS Director /

5 11am - Grant Highlights & Changes Data Highlights Budget Status Overview of the 5 Grant Programs ▫with a 625B sneak peek 5

6 FY10 Data Highlights Programs offered September 1, 2009 through August 31, programs served 18,200 students – ▫Approximately 11% of the 170,460 students eligible ▫Participants were in the classes of (8 th graders through post 12 th graders) Close to 90% of participants were served through 375 allocation grants. The remaining students were served through four types of competitive grants for: ▫districts, community colleges, One Stop Career Centers, and other partners (e.g.,Workforce Inv. Boards). Roughly 70% of the funds support allocation grants. The remaining grant funds are distributed through the four competitive grant programs, each of them awarding 5-10% of the total amount of funding available for grants. Participants were 1.6 times more likely to have met the state’s ELA and Mathematics MCAS testing requirements by November 2010 than eligible youth who did not participate. In fact, participants were 28 percentage points more likely to have met these testing requirements by that date. Moreover, this difference held true when looking at students by class year as well as by selected populations. 6

7 Participants were 1.6 times more likely to have met the state’s ELA and Mathematics MCAS testing requirements by November 2010 than eligible youth who did not participate. In fact, participants were 28 percentage points more likely to have met these testing requirements by that date. Moreover, this difference held true when looking at students by class year as well as by selected populations. 7

8 Percentage of Students Passing the ELA and Mathematics Grade 10 MCAS/Retest CD Requirement by Class Year, FY10 8

9 Percentage of Students Passing the ELA and Mathematics Grade 10 MCAS/Retest CD Requirement by Selected Populations, FY10 9

10 Status of the State Budget FY line item amount (supporting Academic Support Programs) Nearly $9.1M TO DATE: Governor's Budget -January 26, 2011 – Nearly $9.7MJanuary 26, 2011 House Ways & Means (HWM) Budget - April 13, 2011 – Close to $9.6MApril 13, 2011 House Budget - April 28, 2011 (after amendments debated) – (same as HWM)April 28, 2011 Senate Ways & Means (SWM) Budget -May 18, 2011 – Just over $8.3MMay 18, 2011 STILL TO COME in May/June: Senate Budget – soon (after amendments to SWM debated) Governor's Budget revised if revenue forecasts predict a shortfall after the original submission. Conference Committee Budget (with House and Senate leadership) Vetoes - the Governor has ten days to review it and approve or veto the entire budget, or veto or reduce particular line items or sections. Overrides by House and Senate with a 2/3rds roll-call vote in each chamber. Final Budget - known as the General Appropriations Act (GAA) or "Chapter xxx of the Acts of 2011.” 10

11 And this means… RFP’s were drafted anticipating approximate level funding. We will not decide any competitive grant amounts or finalize allocation amounts until after the final FY12 budget is passed. You can plan based on FY11 amounts and then adjust if needed once amounts are confirmed. If we need to make any changes to the RFPs after the budget is passed, we will let you know. We will alert eligible entities when allocation amounts are finalized and posted. 11

12 Academic Support Grants Summary 625-B: Academic Support Summer Enhancement Grant (for Summer 2011) FY12 School Year / Summer Fund Codes & Grant Program Names 632/625 : Academic Support Programs for Districts & Approved Private Special Education Schools/Collaboratives 598/593: Academic Support & College Transition Services 596/597: Work & Learning Programs 619/592: Collaborative Partnerships for Student Success (CPSS) 627/626: Pathways One Stop Career Center Initiative 12


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