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Tuition Policy Advisory Committee Meeting September 2, 2003 Committee Meeting #1.

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Presentation on theme: "Tuition Policy Advisory Committee Meeting September 2, 2003 Committee Meeting #1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tuition Policy Advisory Committee Meeting September 2, 2003 Committee Meeting #1

2 Today’s Agenda President’s Welcome President’s Welcome Procedural Issues Procedural Issues Background Information Background Information – recent history – university finances… – next year’s budget – tuition & fees

3 Welcome and Thank You for Agreeing to Serve!

4 Procedural Issues

5 Working Timeline

6 Recent History Recent History

7 Recent History Aging infrastructure confirmed by third party studies – conclusion: Under funding R&R $20M per year Infrastructure fee proposed but rendered impractical by AG ruling Legislative solutions sought with limited success UBC focused on $40M recurring shortfall for the FY03/04 fiscal year: $ 5M Aggressive cost savings measures $25M General budget reductions undertaken $10M R&R budget reduced to cover final legislative “dings”

8 Legislative Session Outcome Positives Negatives 100% IDC Retention +$20M 100% IDC Retention +$20M Tuition Flexibility Tuition Flexibility Continued downward trend in State financial support Continued downward trend in State financial support  GR reduction ($22M)  P/T Benefits ($6M)  90 Day Wait ($2M)  TX Tomorrow ($3M)  B-on-Time ($?M)  Higher tuition set asides $20M -$33M

9 Budget issues to Deal with $30M annual shortfall in R&R funding $30M annual shortfall in R&R funding –$20M annual coming into the year –$10M reduction to balance the Fy03/04 budget $15M recurring shortfall in competitive compensation funding $15M recurring shortfall in competitive compensation funding

10 University Finances

11 Total University Budget Educational & General Component 59% Endowment Component 9% Research Component 20% Auxiliary Component 12% $846.7M + 6.8% University Finances FY03/04 Total University Budget $1.44B $176.6M + 2.2% $129.1M – 1.0% $292.2M % $1.44B + 4.7% or $63M

12 University Finances How does State General Revenue fit into the Picture?

13 The Permanent University Fund (PUF) Why isn’t it enough? PUF Lands==> 02’ Market Value $6.7B PUF Lands ==> 02’ Market Value $6.7B Available University Fund 2/3 UT System 1/3 A&M System System Costs PUF Bonds UT Austin UT Austin receives about 30% of the total distributed income from the PUF UT Austin return on investment <== return on investment Fy03/04 $109.4M

14 Next Year’s Budget Next Year’s Budget

15 Budget Accomplishments For our State Improved research competitiveness Improved research competitiveness For our Students Additional faculty positions Additional faculty positions Increased tuition & scholarship support Increased tuition & scholarship support Capacity to invest in specific programmatic initiatives Capacity to invest in specific programmatic initiatives For our Employees Preservation of a competitive benefit program Preservation of a competitive benefit program Possibility of mid-year salary program Possibility of mid-year salary program

16 It was a challenge to balance the budget! Efficiency Improvements $5M from Office Supplies & Credit Card changes…more to come $5M from Office Supplies & Credit Card changes…more to come Across-the-board Budget Reductions $25M total reductions…$4M from occupied positions $25M total reductions…$4M from occupied positions Reduced Infrastructure Funding $10M reduction in an area already under funded! $10M reduction in an area already under funded!

17 What are our Continuing Challenges? Infrastructure Funding - $30M annual shortfall

18 Facility Aging Drives Repair & Renovation (R&R) Requirements There is a significant bubble of R&R requirements in the near future. A substantial portion of the University’s Plant, those projects built in the 50’s through 80’s, is approaching years old and will require substantial repair and renovation.

19 Why is a Near Term Infrastructure Solution Needed – Why can’t this wait? Campus & Building Safety Cost Usability / Habitability Continuity of Plant Operations

20 What are our Continuing Challenges? Competitive Compensation Program Funding - $15M recurring

21 Tuition & Fees

22 Appropriation & Tuition and Fees Collected per FTE 1999/00 UT vs. Peer Institutions

23 Competitive Position – Tuition & Mandatory Fees UT vs. Other Institutions (2002 Data) Source: Morgan Stanley, based on information from the College Board and the Chronicle of Higher Education..

24 A Rule of Thumb for Planning  Every dollar increase in tuition generates about $1M of net revenue, after set-asides, for the University on an annual basis.  Therefore, a student taking 28 SCH annually would pay $28 more in tuition per year for each $1 increase in tuition.

25 Next Steps

26 The Challenge Summary Infrastructure Funding - $30M annual Compensation Program Funding - $15M recurring

27 Possible Near Term Solutions Reduce expenses elsewhere and reinvest in R&R Just completed exhaustive effort Impossible to not impact people Reduce / eliminate January compensation program Increases competitive issues Not a long-term fix Increase tuition

28 Thank You


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