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© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 29: Sandwiches.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 29: Sandwiches."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 29: Sandwiches Versatile, profitable, popular, and served all day, there is a sandwich for everyone

2 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

3 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Four Basic Components Bread, most types Spread to keep bread from becoming soggy Fillings, endless possibilities Garnish

4 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Types of Sandwiches Open-faced

5 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Types of Sandwiches (continued) Club sandwich

6 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Types of Sandwiches (continued) Griddled

7 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Types of Sandwiches (continued) Finger

8 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Types of Sandwiches (continued) Closed-faced

9 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. The Elements Bread determines how and what can be put into the sandwich Shapes, types of batter and flavors, textures, all effect the type of closed sandwich Ethnic breads usually have traditional fillings Fine-grained, like pullmans, are good for clubs, tea, and basic, two-slice items; they will slice without crumbling Coarse-grained are good for large sandwiches Rolls, round or long, are split for fillings Flatbreads may be split and filled or used as a base for an open-faced sandwich Wraps are great for shredded, creamy fillings

10 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

11 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Spreads Fat-based spread keeps the bread from getting soggy, for awhile Add palatability For salad-type fillings such as tuna or chicken, bread will need no spread Types of spreads are dairy-based (cream cheese), flavored butters, mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard, vegetable and herb spreads, jelly, jam and compotes, guacamole, mayonnaise The spread should be complimentary to the filling

12 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. The Fillings The Focus of the Sandwich May be cold, hot, chopped, ground, sliced Can be Meat, fish, poultry Grilled, roasted, marinated, baked Cheese, cheese spreads Eggs, egg salad, or a combination

13 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Garnish Well-trimmed and cleaned Sliced correctly to be contrasting but not overpowering Crisp, fresh, and complimentary Most lettuce, sprouts, tomatoes, peppers, olives, and cucumbers are marinated

14 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Finger and Tea Sandwiches Mise en place is key To do sandwiches, everything must be lined up for production Chef should not have to run for one item That includes foods, equipment, and holding containers or plates if it is à la carte Cut close to service and if prepared in the morning, cover tightly so the bread does not dry out Straight-edge cuts are the best yield, but other shapes will make a banquet tray very attractive

15 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Production Guidelines Organize your work station Tools, food, equipment Food well-chilled Equipment immaculate Holding equipment clean and dry Wrapping paper or chilled plates Organize the work flow to be comfortable to you

16 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Production Guidelines (continued) Prepare all your slices, spreads, garnishes ahead Do not slice bread too far ahead Some fillings may be portioned on a sheet pan ahead and kept chilled Major BLT production can be preassembled ahead, just spread the bread and pick up the layers of bacon, lettuce, and tomato, cover, slice, and plate


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