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CPU Scheduling CPU Scheduler Performance metrics for CPU scheduling Methods for analyzing schedulers CPU scheduling algorithms Case study:  CPU scheduling.

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Presentation on theme: "CPU Scheduling CPU Scheduler Performance metrics for CPU scheduling Methods for analyzing schedulers CPU scheduling algorithms Case study:  CPU scheduling."— Presentation transcript:

1 CPU Scheduling CPU Scheduler Performance metrics for CPU scheduling Methods for analyzing schedulers CPU scheduling algorithms Case study:  CPU scheduling in Solaris, Window XP, and Linux.

2 CPU Scheduler A CPU scheduler, running in the dispatcher, is responsible for selecting of the next running process.  Based on a particular strategy When does CPU scheduling happen?  Four cases: A process switches from the running state to waiting state (e.g. I/O request) A process switches from the running state to the ready state. A process switches from waiting state to ready state (completion of an I/O operation) A process terminates

3 Scheduling queues CPU schedulers use various queues in the scheduling process:  Job queue: consists of all processes All jobs (processes), once submitted, are in the job queue. Some processes cannot be executed (e.g. not in memory).  Ready queue All processes that are ready and waiting for execution are in the ready queue. Usually, a long-term scheduler/job scheduler selects processes from the job queue to the ready queue. CPU scheduler/short-term scheduler selects a process from the ready queue for execution.  Simple systems may not have a long-term job scheduler

4 Scheduling queues Device queue  When a process is blocked in an I/O operation, it is usually put in a device queue (waiting for the device).  When the I/O operation is completed, the process is moved from the device queue to the ready queue.

5 An example scheduling queue structure  Figure 3.6

6 Queueing diagram representation of process scheduling  Figure 3.7

7 Performance metrics for CPU scheduling CPU utilization: percentage of the time that CPU is busy. Throughput: the number of processes completed per unit time Turnaround time: the interval from the time of submission of a process to the time of completion. Wait time: the sum of the periods spent waiting in the ready queue Response time: the time of submission to the time the first response is produced

8 Goal of CPU scheduling Other performance metrics:  fairness: It is important, but harder to define quantitatively. Goal:  Maximize CPU utilization, Throughput, and fairness.  Minimize turnaround time, waiting time, and response time.

9 Which metric is used more? CPU utilization  Trivial in a single CPU system Fairness  Tricky, even definition is non-trivial Throughput, turnaround time, wait time, and response time  Can usually be computed for a given scenario.  They may not be more important than fairness, but they are more tractable than fairness.

10 Methods for evaluating CPU scheduling algorithms Simulation:  Get the workload from a system  Simulate the scheduling algorithm  Compute the performance metrics based on simulation results  This is practically the best evaluation method. Queueing models:  Analytically model the queue behavior (under some assumptions).  A lot of math, but may not be very accurate because of unrealistic assumptions.

11 Methods for evaluating CPU scheduling algorithms Deterministic Modeling  Take a predetermined workload  Run the scheduling algorithm manually  Find out the value of the performance metric that you care about.  Not the best for practical uses, but can give a lot of insides about the scheduling algorithm. Help understand the scheduling algorithm, as well as it strengths and weaknesses

12 Deterministic modeling example: Suppose we have processes A, B, and C, submitted at time 0 We want to know the response time, waiting time, and turnaround time of process A ABCABCACAC Time response time = 0 + + wait time turnaround time Gantt chart: visualize how processes execute.

13 Deterministic modeling example Suppose we have processes A, B, and C, submitted at time 0 We want to know the response time, waiting time, and turnaround time of process B ABCABCACAC Time response time + wait time turnaround time

14 Deterministic modeling example Suppose we have processes A, B, and C, submitted at time 0 We want to know the response time, waiting time, and turnaround time of process C ABCABCACAC Time response time + ++ wait time turnaround time

15 Preemptive versus nonpreemptive scheduling Many CPU scheduling algorithms have both preemptive and nonpreemptive versions:  Preemptive: schedule a new process even when the current process does not intend to give up the CPU  Non-preemptive: only schedule a new process when the current one does not want CPU any more. When do we perform non-preemptive scheduling? A process switches from the running state to waiting state (e.g. I/O request) A process switches from the running state to the ready state. A process switches from waiting state to ready state (completion of an I/O operation) A process terminates

16 Scheduling Policies FIFO (first in, first out) Round robin SJF (shortest job first) Priority Scheduling Multilevel feedback queues Lottery scheduling This is obviously an incomplete list

17 FIFO FIFO: assigns the CPU based on the order of requests  Nonpreemptive: A process keeps running on a CPU until it is blocked or terminated  Also known as FCFS (first come, first serve) + Simple - Short jobs can get stuck behind long jobs - Turnaround time is not ideal (get an example from the class)

18 Round Robin Round Robin (RR) periodically releases the CPU from long-running jobs  Based on timer interrupts so short jobs can get a fair share of CPU time  Preemptive: a process can be forced to leave its running state and replaced by another running process  Time slice: interval between timer interrupts

19 More on Round Robin If time slice is too long  Scheduling degrades to FIFO If time slice is too short  Throughput suffers  Context switching cost dominates

20 FIFO vs. Round Robin With zero-cost context switch, is RR always better than FIFO?

21 FIFO vs. Round Robin Suppose we have three jobs of equal length ABCABC Time ABC turnaround time of A turnaround time of B turnaround time of C Round Robin AB Time C turnaround time of A turnaround time of B turnaround time of C FIFO

22 FIFO vs. Round Robin Round Robin + Shorter response time + Fair sharing of CPU - Not all jobs are preemptable - Not good for jobs of the same length - More precisely, not good in terms of the turnaround time.

23 Shortest Job First (SJF) SJF runs whatever job puts the least demand on the CPU, also known as STCF (shortest time to completion first) + Provably optimal in terms of turn-around time (anyone can give an informal proof?). + Great for short jobs + Small degradation for long jobs Real life example: supermarket express checkouts

24 SJF Illustrated AB Time C turnaround time of A turnaround time of B turnaround time of C Shortest Job First response time of A = 0 response time of B response time of C wait time of A = 0 wait time of B wait time of C

25 Shortest Remaining Time First (SRTF) SRTF: a preemptive version of SJF  If a job arrives with a shorter time to completion, SRTF preempts the CPU for the new job  Also known as SRTCF (shortest remaining time to completion first)  Generally used as the base case for comparisons

26 SJF and SRTF vs. FIFO and Round Robin If all jobs are the same length, SJF  FIFO  FIFO is the best you can do If jobs have varying length  Short jobs do not get stuck behind long jobs under SRTF

27 Drawbacks of Shortest Job First - Starvation: constant arrivals of short jobs can keep long ones from running - There is no way to know the completion time of jobs (most of the time)  Some solutions Ask the user, who may not know any better If a user cheats, the job is killed

28 Priority Scheduling (Multilevel Queues) Priority scheduling: The process with the highest priority runs first Priority 0: Priority 1: Priority 2: Assume that low numbers represent high priority A B C AB Time C Priority Scheduling

29 + Generalization of SJF  With SJF, priority = 1/requested_CPU_time - Starvation

30 Multilevel Feedback Queues Multilevel feedback queues use multiple queues with different priorities  Round robin at each priority level  Run highest priority jobs first  Once those finish, run next highest priority, etc  Jobs start in the highest priority queue  If time slice expires, drop the job by one level  If time slice does not expire, push the job up by one level

31 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): ABC time = 0 Time

32 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): BC time = 1 A A Time

33 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): C time = 2 AB AB Time

34 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): C time = 3 AB ABC Time

35 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): C time = 3 AB ABC Time suppose process A is blocked on an I/O

36 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): C time = 3 A B ABC Time suppose process A is blocked on an I/O

37 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): time = 5 BABC Time C A suppose process A is returned from an I/O

38 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): time = 6 BABC Time C A

39 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): time = 8 BABC Time AC C

40 Multilevel Feedback Queues Priority 0 (time slice = 1): Priority 1 (time slice = 2): Priority 2 (time slice = 4): time = 9 BABC Time ACC

41 Multilevel Feedback Queues Approximates SRTF  A CPU-bound job drops like a rock  I/O-bound jobs stay near the top  Still unfair for long running jobs  Counter-measure: Aging Increase the priority of long running jobs if they are not serviced for a period of time Tricky to tune aging

42 Lottery Scheduling Lottery scheduling is an adaptive scheduling approach to address the fairness problem  Each process owns some tickets  On each time slice, a ticket is randomly picked  On average, the allocated CPU time is proportional to the number of tickets given to each job

43 Lottery Scheduling To approximate SJF, short jobs get more tickets To avoid starvation, each job gets at least one ticket

44 Lottery Scheduling Example short jobs: 10 tickets each long jobs: 1 ticket each # short jobs/# long jobs % of CPU for each short job % of CPU for each long job 1/191%9% 0/20%50% 2/050%0% 10/110%1% 1/1050%5%

45 Case study: CPU scheduling in Solaris:  Priority-based scheduling Four classes: real time, system, time sharing, interactive (in order of priority) Different priorities and algorithm in different classes Default class: time sharing Policy in the time sharing class:  Multilevel feedback queue with variable time slices  See the dispatch table

46 Solaris dispatch table for interactive and time-sharing threads Good response time for interactive processes and good throughput for CPU-bound processes

47 Windows XP scheduling A priority-based, preemptive scheduling Highest priority thread will always run Also have multiple classes and priorities within classes Similar idea for user processes – Multilevel feedback queue Lower priority when quantum runs out Increase priority after a wait event Some twists to improve “user perceived” performance: Boost priority and quantum for foreground process (the window that is currently selected). Boost priority more for a wait on keyboard I/O (as compared to disk I/O)

48 Linux scheduling A priority-based, preemptive with global round-robin scheduling  Each process have a priority  Processes with a larger priority also have a larger time slices  Before the time slices is used up, processes are scheduled based on priority.  After the time slice of a process is used up, the process must wait until all ready processes to use up their time slice (or be blocked) – a round-robin approach. No starvation problem.  For a user process, its priority may + or – 5 depending whether the process is I/O- bound or CPU-bound. Giving I/O bound process higher priority.

49 Summary for the case study Basic idea for schedule user processes is the same for all systems:  Lower priority for CPU bound process  Increase priority for I/O bound process The scheduling in Solaris / Linux is more concerned about fairness.  More popular as the OSes for servers. The scheduling in Window XP is more concerned about user perceived performance.  More popular as the OS for personal computers.


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