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Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen Guffey and Dana Loewy Instructor PowerPoint Library, 8e 8 Positive Messages © 2015 Cengage Learning.

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Presentation on theme: "Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen Guffey and Dana Loewy Instructor PowerPoint Library, 8e 8 Positive Messages © 2015 Cengage Learning."— Presentation transcript:

1 Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen Guffey and Dana Loewy Instructor PowerPoint Library, 8e 8 Positive Messages © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 1

2 Learning Objective 1 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 2 Understand the channels through which typical positive messages travel in the digital era— s, memos, and business letters—and apply the 3-x-3 writing process.

3 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 3 Positive Messages— Characteristics 1 1 Are routine and straightforward Positive messages share the following traits: 2 2 Help workers conduct everyday business 3 3 Make up the bulk of workplace communication 4 4 Require solid writing skills

4 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 4 Positive Messages—Types 1 1 Simple requests for information or action 2 2 Replies to customers 3 3 Explanations to coworkers 4 4 Instructions 5 5 Direct claims and complaints

5 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © mostafa fawzy/Fotolia, © Marina Zlochin/Fotolia, © Dark Vectorangel/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 5 Channels Used for Positive Messages s Memos Letters Social media networks Blogs IM and text messages

6 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Iadam/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 6 Effective Positive Messages and the Writing Process Phase 1: Analysis, Anticipation, and Adaptation Do I really need to write this , memo, or letter? Why am I writing? How will the reader react? What channel should I use? How can I save my reader’s time?

7 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Marina Zlochin/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 7 Business Letters Are still the preferred channel for external communication in certain situations Go to suppliers, government agencies, vendors, and customers Encourage feedback Project a favorable image of the organization Promote future business

8 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Marina Zlochin/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 8 Business Letters Provide a permanent record Are confidential and formal Deliver contracts Explain terms Share ideas Negotiate agreements Answer vendor questions Maintain customer relations

9 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 9 Effective Positive Messages and the Writing Process Phase 2: Research, Organization, and Drafting Collect information. Choose the best organizational strategy. Compose the first draft. Group similar information together. Keep your paragraphs short.

10 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 10 Effective Positive Messages and the Writing Process Phase 3: Revision, Proofreading, and Evaluation Is the message clear? Is the message correct? Did you plan for feedback? Will this message achieve its purpose?

11 Learning Objective 2 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 11 Compose direct messages that make requests, respond to inquiries online and offline, and deliver step-by-step instructions.

12 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 12 Creating Request Messages Opening– main idea first: Ask a question or issue a polite command (Please answer the following question). Avoid long explanations preceding the main idea.

13 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 13 Creating Request Messages Body—provide details and explain your purpose: Express questions in numbered or bulleted form. Use open-ended questions (What steps are necessary…?) instead of yes-or-no questions (Can she conclude her contractual obligation…?). Suggest reader benefits, if possible.

14 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 14 Creating Request Messages Closing—end with appreciation and a call for action: State specifically, but courteously, what action is to be taken. Set an end date, if necessary. Provide a logical reason for the end date.

15 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 15 Creating Request Messages Avoid cliché endings (Thank you for your cooperation). Show appreciation, but use a fresh expression. Make it easy for the receiver to respond. Closing—end with appreciation and a call for action:

16 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 16 To: Kim Johnson From: Tim Rudolph Subject: New Policy This is written to inform you that I continue to receive disturbing reports about the misuse of by employees. In the course of the past three months I have heard of defamatory messages, downloads of pornography for all the staff to see, and even a basketball pool that turned into a gambling operation. In view of the foregoing, I am herewith instructing your office that an policy for the staff is needed. By October 1 a rough draft of a policy should be forthcoming. At the very minimum it should inform each and every employee that is for business only. Employees must be told that we reserve the right to monitor all messages. No pictures or attachments should be in the system without there being a valid reason. And we should not be using to be saying anything about personnel matters—such as performance reviews and salaries. If you have any questions, do not hesitate to call. “Before”—Ineffective Request

17 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 17 To: Kim Johnson From: Tim Rudolph Subject: Developing Staff Policy Please draft a policy outlining appropriate use for employees. We need such a policy because I have received reports of misuse including defamatory messages, pornography downloads, and even gambling. Here are a few points that the policy should cover:  is for business use only.  messages may be monitored.  No pictures or attachments should be sent without a valid reason.  should not be used to discuss personnel matters. Please submit a draft to me by October 2 because we hope to have a final policy completed by November 5. Call if you have questions. “After”—Improved Request

18 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 18 Responding to Requests Subject Line Identify the topic and any previous correspondence. Use abbreviated style, omitting articles (a, an, the).

19 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 19 Responding to Requests Opening Open directly. Deliver the information the reader wants. When announcing good news, do so promptly.

20 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 20 Responding to Requests Body Explain the subject logically. Use lists, tables, headings, boldface, italics, or other graphic devices to improve readability. Promote your products and your organization to customers.

21 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 21 Responding to Requests Closing Offer a concluding thought, perhaps referring to the information or action requested. Avoid cliché endings (If you have any other questions, don’t hesitate to call). Be cordial.

22 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 22 Responding to Customers Online Vocal individuals can start a firestorm of criticism or become powerful brand ambassadors championing certain products they love. Companies must adopt strategies that help them to decide when and in what ways to respond. Decision trees and diagrams guide employees in responding to online prices.

23 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 23 Responding to Customers Online Be positive Be transparent Be honest Be timely Be helpful

24 Learning Objective 3 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 24 Prepare contemporary messages that make direct claims and voice complaints, including those posted online.

25 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Iadam/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 25 Direct Claims and Complaints Opening Explain immediately what you want done. State the remedy briefly when it is obvious (Please credit my Visa account). Explain your goal when the remedy is not obvious

26 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Iadam/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 26 Direct Claims and Complaints Body Explain the problem and justify your request. Provide details objectively and concisely. Be organized and coherent. Don’t ramble.

27 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Iadam/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 27 Direct Claims and Complaints Body Avoid becoming angry or trying to fix blame. Include names and dates with previous actions.

28 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Iadam/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 28 Direct Claims and Complaints Closing End courteously with a tone that promotes goodwill. Request specific action, including end date, if appropriate.

29 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 29 Posting Complaints and Reviews Online 1 1 Exhaust all other options for claims with the company before venting online. 2 2 Don’t express dissatisfaction just to let off steam. 3 3 Think whether people you respect and prospective employers would approve. 4 4 Understand that businesses can sue individuals for negative online posts.

30 Learning Objective 3 © 2014 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 30 Prepare contemporary messages that make direct claims and voice complaints, including those posted online. Learning Objective 4 Create adjustment messages that salvage customers’ trust and promote further business. © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

31 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 31 Adjustment Messages Opening When approving a customer’s claim, announce the good news (adjustment) immediately. Avoid sounding grudging or reluctant.

32 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 32 Adjustment Messages Body Strive to win back the customer’s confidence. Explain what went wrong (if you know).

33 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 33 Adjustment Messages Body Apologize if it seems appropriate, but be careful about admitting responsibility. Check with your boss or legal counsel first.

34 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 34 Adjustment Messages Body Concentrate on explaining how diligently your organization works to avoid disappointing customers. Avoid negative language (trouble, regret, fault).

35 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 35 Adjustment Messages Body Avoid blaming customers— even if they are at fault. Avoid blaming individuals or departments in your organization. It sounds unprofessional.

36 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 36 Adjustment Messages Closing Show appreciation that the customer wrote. Consider expressing confidence that the problem has been resolved. Thank the customer for past business. Refer to your desire to be of service.

37 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 37 Learning Objective 5 Write special messages that convey kindness and goodwill.

38 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 8, Slide 38 The Five Ss of Goodwill Messages Be selfless Be specific Be sincere Be sponta- neous Keep it short

39 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 39 Saying Thank You Written notes showing appreciation and expressing thanks are significant to their receivers. Thank-you notes are typically short messages written on special notepaper or heavy card stock. Businesspeople build goodwill by thanking others gracefully.

40 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 40 Replying to Goodwill Messages Send a brief note expressing your appreciation. Tell how good the message made you feel. Accept praise gracefully. Don’t make belittling statements. (I’m not really all that good).

41 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 41 Is Appropriate for Goodwill Messages? Depending on your relationship with the receiver, sending a goodwill message by is acceptable. An may precede a phone call or a handwritten message. Handwritten notes are most impressive because they remain and can be savored. is quickly forgotten.

42 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Ch. 8, Slide 42 END


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