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Selling Advertising Space Capitalize on Celebrity’s Appearance at Event Media Relations.

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Presentation on theme: "Selling Advertising Space Capitalize on Celebrity’s Appearance at Event Media Relations."— Presentation transcript:

1 Selling Advertising Space Capitalize on Celebrity’s Appearance at Event Media Relations

2 ADS ON BACK OF TICKETS Most professional baseball/football teams have discovered tickets have more uses than simply to admit people to a game. One of these uses is to generate more revenue by selling advertising space on the back of the tickets. Many businesses are willing to buy this space because it is seen by many people who might be potential customers. For example, a quick-serve restaurant might buy space to print a coupon on the back of tickets. The coupon encourages people to visit the restaurant. The restaurant attracts more customers and the teams increase their revenue. Professional teams DO NOT SELL advertising in local magazines, on national television, or in community newspapers. They usually BUY advertising in these types of media.

3 CELEBRITY – GRAND OPENING A celebrity is a well-known person. Celebrities include athletes, politicians, business leaders, community leaders, musicians, actors, etc. Businesses often include celebrity appearances as a way to attract a target market to a particular event. An example of a business capitalizing on a celebrity's appearance at an event would be a rock star agreeing to sign copies of her/his latest CD at a store's grand opening. The business (store) benefits because the celebrity (rock star) is appearing at an event (grand opening).

4 MEDIA - EDITOR The editor decides whether to publish or broadcast the release. Space and time are limited, so the editor determines what will be interesting to the medium's audience. The business should not continuously contact media outlets until they agree to publish or broadcast the release. Receiving such calls may be annoying and hinder the business's ability to obtain press coverage in the future. Publishing or broadcasting only the releases from businesses that purchase advertising from the media outlet is unfair and unethical.

5 MEDIA - DEADLINES All media have deadlines for the material they use. It is important to find out what these deadlines are to get news releases to each medium on time. Sending news releases reasonably close to the deadline often helps to get the news releases used. Sending them too far in advance of the deadlines may cause the releases to be lost or misplaced. It is not important to obtain the publisher's name, advertising rates, or network affiliation in order to get news releases used.

6 MEDIA - PUBLICITY Publicity is any non-personal presentation of ideas, goods, or services that is NOT PAID FOR by the company or individual that benefits from or is harmed by it. When an advertising agency has good relationships with the media, media outlets are more likely to print or broadcast a story pitch or news release about the agency's client. Publicity may help generate sales, which generates a monetary reward, but it is the publicity that initially generates sales. Sales promotions are activities other than advertising, personal selling, and publicity that stimulate customer purchases. Positive relationships with the media do NOT usually generate new markets for the advertising agency's client.

7 MEDIA - CORRECTIONS If you discover an error in a press release, call the media to give the correct information. This action helps to protect the reputation of your business and your relationship with the media. Not saying a word to the media, assigning another employee to correct the problem, or waiting for a media staff person to contact the business is not good business practice. These actions would make the media less likely to present future releases.

8 MEDIA – PRESS RELEASES When writing news releases, businesses should stick to the facts and avoid including their opinions or expressing their feelings. Because news releases are supposed to be objective, they should not include the opinions of a business. However, a news release may include someone else's opinion if it adds credibility to the story. Businesses often write news releases that include statistics and information about their goals and locations, because these data are factual.

9 MEDIA – HONEST & PROFESSIONAL Positive relationships are built on trust. Trust is cultivated by being honest. Therefore, to develop positive relationships with the media, public- relations professionals should present themselves in a professional and honest manner. Being professional includes being diplomatic, approachable, organized, and sensitive to others' motives; however, it does not mean that the public- relations director should be impressionable or distant, show aggression, or exhibit hostile suspicion.

10 COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC Sport/event organizations need to communicate with the public to promote themselves and attract customers. Developing and generating newsletters is an effective way to communicate because newsletters contain valuable information about the organizations and their activities.

11 COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC For example, sending newsletters to current ticket holders to explain next year's schedule will encourage those consumers to buy more tickets and attend the events. Sport/event organizations usually send press releases rather than newsletters to the media. They DO NOT develop and generate newsletters to obtain feedback from sponsors or to prepare for problems.

12 NEGATIVE PUBLICITY Many people are critical of the millions of dollars that today's athletes are paid to perform. To overcome the perception of being greedy, athletes sometimes donate their time and their talents to charitable causes such as Special Olympics, Race for the Cure, and The March of Dimes.

13 NEGATIVE PUBLICITY Since the athlete is working as a spokesperson on a volunteer basis, s/he will NOT ADD more income to the millions of dollars received for athletic performance. However, the athlete's motives for becoming a spokesperson were in reaction to criticism for his/her multimillion-dollar income. To attract a new sponsor, it would be necessary to find an alternative business, individual, or organization that is willing to pay the cost of promoting the athlete.

14 MUTUALLY FAVORABLE RELATIONSHIPS An interactive relationship requires open, two-way communication. To build an ongoing relationship, both parties (the sport organization and the media) must get something out it—it must be favorable for both sides. For example, the sport organization might pitch story ideas, provide press kits, and distribute press releases to media outlets. The media, on the other hand, might develop stories and print press releases. This benefits both parties because the media has something to report, and the sport organization is obtaining publicity.

15 MUTUALLY FAVORABLE RELATIONSHIPS Having an interactive relationship with the media DOES NOT mean that the sport organization should not develop a public- relations plan nor does it ensure that all information exchanges are kept confidential. Additionally, interactive relationships with the media DO NOT necessarily reduce crisis risks for the sport organization.

16 POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH MEDIA Magazines, newspapers, radio, television, and the Internet are primary forms of sports information and event coverage. To maximize game coverage and favorable news, sport organizations must work to develop positive relationships with the media. To create favorable relationships with the media, sport organizations pitch story ideas, hold news conferences, provide office equipment and space for traveling news reporters, and negotiate broadcasting rights for various games and events.

17 POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH MEDIA Favorable media relations DO NOT REDUCE an organization's need to obtain income from a variety of sources because income is necessary for the organization to operate. Endorsement deals are negotiated between the athlete and the business seeking the endorsement agreement. Sport organizations CANNOT PREVENT information leaks to the public; however, sport organizations that have positive relationships with the media are more likely to receive balanced media coverage of events, whether they are favorable or unfavorable.

18 MEDIA GUIDES Sport/event planners often develop media guides to encourage television and newspaper coverage of the sport or event. Media guides explain the sport/event in detail and provide information about participants, location, price, etc. The goal is to generate interest so the media will provide coverage, which in turn will encourage spectators to buy tickets to attend. Sport/event planners DO NOT develop local contests, sales promotions, or creative themes to encourage television and newspaper coverage.

19 MEDIA DAY The more publicity sport/event organizers can obtain, the better the chances for increasing ticket sales as well as attendance. That is one reason why they often plan a day to give the media an opportunity to visit the site in advance. While touring the site, the media might video or photograph the preparations and show the video on television news or print the photos in the newspaper. The media might write stories about the upcoming sport/event.

20 MEDIA DAY Furthermore, during media day, organizers usually provide additional information and may make arrangements for the media to interview athletes or performers. The goal is to encourage the media to publicize the preparations, which also generates publicity for the sport/event. Media day is NOT the time when the media pick up their credentials or set up broadcast equipment. The sport/event organizers, rather than the media, hold press conferences.

21 CAPTIONED PHOTO A captioned photo is a picture accompanied by written text called a caption. Including a photo with a print news release can help to get information presented. The print media will sometimes use a news release simply because they like the photo, or they think it will add interest to a particular page. Businesses should send a thank-you note to the editor AFTER the release is used. Michael Phelps

22 REV IEW

23 NEED QUESTIONS:

24 43 (2).What do businesses need to remember after they send a news release to the media? A.The business should continuously call the media outlets until they publish or broadcast the release. B.Most magazines and newspapers are willing to publish all the news releases they receive. C.Media outlets will only use press releases for businesses that purchase advertising. D.The editor decides whether to publish or broadcast the release.

25 43 (2).What do businesses need to remember after they send a news release to the media? A.The business should continuously call the media outlets until they publish or broadcast the release. B.Most magazines and newspapers are willing to publish all the news releases they receive. C.Media outlets will only use press releases for businesses that purchase advertising. D.The editor decides whether to publish or broadcast the release.

26 44(2).What information should a business obtain to get its news releases used? A.Advertising rates B.Media deadlines C.Publisher's name D.Network affiliation

27 44(2).What information should a business obtain to get its news releases used? A.Advertising rates B.Media deadlines C.Publisher's name D.Network affiliation

28 45 (2).Ms. Johnson did not proofread a news release before it was mailed to the media, and several errors were found later. In order to minimize the damage that may result, Ms. Johnson should A.wait for the media to contact the business. B.say nothing, but proofread future releases. C.ask another employee to handle the problem. D.call the media to give the correct information.

29 45 (2).Ms. Johnson did not proofread a news release before it was mailed to the media, and several errors were found later. In order to minimize the damage that may result, Ms. Johnson should A.wait for the media to contact the business. B.say nothing, but proofread future releases. C.ask another employee to handle the problem. D.call the media to give the correct information.

30 46 (2).When writing news releases, businesses should avoid including their A.opinions. B.statistics C. goals D. locations.

31 46 (2).When writing news releases, businesses should avoid including their A.opinions. B.statistics C. goals D. locations.

32 47 (2).Which of the following is an example of a business using a celebrity's appearance to attract customers to an event: A.An actor stars in the lead role of a film that is based on a best-selling novel. B.A professional athlete announces her/his plans to retire within six months. C.An athletic-shoe company distributes a press release about a new endorsement deal. D.A rock star signs copies of his/her latest CD at a store's grand opening.

33 47 (2).Which of the following is an example of a business using a celebrity's appearance to attract customers to an event: A.An actor stars in the lead role of a film that is based on a best-selling novel. B.A professional athlete announces her/his plans to retire within six months. C.An athletic-shoe company distributes a press release about a new endorsement deal. D.A rock star signs copies of his/her latest CD at a store's grand opening.

34 48.(2) When sport/event marketers use ongoing, two-way communication to build trust and goodwill with the media, they are creating a(n) __________ relationship. A.comprehensive B.interactive C. reactive D.exclusive

35 48.(2) When sport/event marketers use ongoing, two-way communication to build trust and goodwill with the media, they are creating a(n) __________ relationship. A.comprehensive B.interactive C. reactive D.exclusive

36 49.(2) Developing positive relationships with people who work for local television stations and newspaper publishers is a way for an advertising agency to generate __________ for its clients. A.new markets B.cash C. sales promotion D.publicity

37 49.(2) Developing positive relationships with people who work for local television stations and newspaper publishers is a way for an advertising agency to generate __________ for its clients. A.new markets B.cash C. sales promotion D.publicity

38 50 (2).To develop positive relationships with the media, an advertising agency's public- relations director must be A.impressionable and suspicious. B.honest and professional. C. organized and distant D.approachable and aggressive.

39 50 (2).To develop positive relationships with the media, an advertising agency's public- relations director must be A.impressionable and suspicious. B.honest and professional. C. organized and distant D.approachable and aggressive.


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