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Created by The University of North Texas in partnership with the Texas Education Agency RFID Radio Frequency ID.

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Presentation on theme: "Created by The University of North Texas in partnership with the Texas Education Agency RFID Radio Frequency ID."— Presentation transcript:

1 Created by The University of North Texas in partnership with the Texas Education Agency RFID Radio Frequency ID

2 2 Use of Modules UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. In reviewing the content of this professional development module, it may be helpful for you to use the following tools to take notes, summarize key points and identify ideas to implement in your classroom: Cornell Notes ExampleCornell Notes ExampleSample Cornell Notes Sheet that demonstrates how to take notes, summarize key points, and identify specific ideas for implementation. Cornell Notes Example Cornell Notes FormCornell Notes FormBlank Cornell Notes Sheet for use in taking notes, summarizing key points, and identifying specific ideas for implementation. Cornell Notes Form

3 3 Use of Modules Mind Map ExampleMind Map Example Example of how to use a mind map to take notes, summarize key points, and identify specific ideas for implementation. Mind Map Example Mind Map Blank FormMind Map Blank FormBlank Mind Map for use in taking notes, summarizing key points, and identifying specific ideas for implementation. Mind Map Blank Form Action PlanAction PlanForm to use in taking ideas for implementation from the professional development module (from Cornell Notes Sheet and/or Mind Map ) and planning to implement them in your classroom. Action Plan UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

4 4 Objectives Provide teachers/instruc tors with up-to- date information about the latest technology in distribution, logistics, and inventory control. Provide information on RFID (radio frequency identification), its current use in manufacturing and retailing to track goods, its current use in other industries, and identify future expanded uses of RFID. Provide an alternative teaching aid to supplement current classroom textbooks. Provide a list of current internet resources related to RFID. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

5 5 Big Vision – Big Goals 8 Initial Manufacturers April 30, Manufacturers January 2005 Wal-Mart The Big Launch UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. Primary Customer Benefit Better merchandising availability – doing a better job of having the right goods at the right place at the right time, improving the customer shopping experience.

6 6 Wal-Mart The Big Launch  Cases and pallets of 21 products  8 Manufacturers Participating in Initial Trial: Hewlett Packard The Gillette Company Johnson & Johnson Kimberly-Clark Kraft Foods, Inc. Nestle Purina Pet Care Proctor & Gamble Co. Unilever PLC. The Launch Begins… April 30, 2004 Beginning January Gregory Johnston,VP,Sam’s “Moving from suppliers, we will be wall to wall, door to door, all products tagged.” UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

7 7 What is RFID? UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. What is RFID Generic term for technologies that use radio waves to automatically ID people or objects. Microchips attached to antenna together are called RFID tag. Tag contains at least 2 parts 1. Integrated circuit for storing & processing information. 2. Antenna for receiving and transmitting a signal. EPC RFID tag used by Wal-Mart

8 8 How Does RFID Work? RFID tag has microchip and antenna Tag Reader sends out electromagnetic waves and the tag antenna is tuned in to receive these waves. Reader RFID tag draws power from the field created by the reader and powers microchips circuits, modulates the waves and converts the new waves into digital data. Digital Data UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

9 9 Types of Tags Three General Varieties Passive No internal power supply Practical read distance range 4 inches to a few meters Device can be quite small Commercially available product exist that can be embedded in a sticker, or under skin – low frequency RFID tags UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

10 10 Types of Tags Active: Internal power source-used to power integrated circuits and broadcast the signal More reliable than passive tags Transmit at higher power levels than passive More effective in water, metal, or longer distance Generally bigger and more expensive Potential shelf life is much shorter Practical distance range-hundreds of meters Battery life up to 10 years UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

11 11 Types of Tags Semi-Passive: Have their own power source, battery only powers the microchip-does not broadcast a signal RF energy reflected back to reader-like passive tag Greater sensitive than passive tags-typically 100 times more Increased range by a factor of 10 3 main advantages: greater sensitivity than passive tags, better battery life than active tags, and perform active functions under its own power even when no reader is present UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

12 12 Typical Tag UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

13 13 What About Cost? RFID Readers – typically cost $1000+ Companies need thousands for all their factories, warehouses, stores RFID Tags –According to John Smiley, Director of Media Relations at Wal-Mart, “the cost per label has decreased from approximately $0.75 per label in 2004 to approximately $0.12-$0.15 per label in 2008.” Price varies depending on quantity May be impractical to put tags on millions of items that cost only a few dollars UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

14 14 What About Cost? Impinj’s UHF Gen 2 Speedway Reader Impinj’s Thin Propeller Design general purpose RFID tag chips EPC-RFID tag used by Wal-Mart Motorola RFID Supply Chain management Tags Item, case and pallet-level application for increased supply chain visibility for various industries Motorola RFID Cargo Tag 40 ft. read range UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

15 15 Is the Bar Code Gone? Not Yet- It took consumers and the industry 25 years to accept it. Limitations may shorten the Life of the Bar Code Scanner needs to see the bar code to read it Bar code can be torn, soiled, fall off Only identifies the product and manufacturer, not the unique item or specific item Bar code unable to detect expiration dates on products UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

16 16 EPC Successor to Bar Code? Purpose To create a “low-cost” method of tracking goods using RFID technology. Benefits  Items do not require line-of-site for goods to be scanned  Tags designed to identify the manufacturer, product/sku, serial number unique to each item UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

17 17 Next Generation of Universal Product Code  UPC symbol identifies make or model  EPC assigns a number to the individual item (the 102 nd can of soup in a shipment is different from the 1,042 nd can of soup.)  Each label tells: when & where the soup was canned to it’s exact location in the supply chain. Benefit: If a recall is needed; you know exactly where the items are located! Learn more about products that know where they have been. Check out the above web site. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

18 18 What’s the Big Deal About RFID? Inventory Systems Benefits 1st year Wal-Mart study showed RFID: 1.Reduced Out-of-Stock by 30% for products selling between 1-15 units per day 2.Reduction of labor costs 3.Simplification of business processes 4.Reduction of inventory inaccuracies UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

19 19 What’s the Big Deal About RFID? Inventory Systems Benefits 2004 Boeing RFID study to help reduce maintenance and inventory costs on Boeing 787 Dreamliner 1. Keep track of inventory-despite unique size, shape and environmental concerns 2. During first 6 months- saved $29,000 in just labor costs UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

20 20 RFID and Fashion EPC Tags to individual garments RFID –enabled dressing rooms and displays RFID –smart mirror Galeria Kaufhof Essen, Germany September, 2007 UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

21 21 RFID and Fashion 3 rd floor, 6,500 sq. ft. men’s apparel dept. 30,000 individual articles of clothing embedded with EPC Gen2 RFID labels Handheld mobile assistants locate specific items, colors, and sizes quickly on the floor or stock room. Handheld’s also conduct daily inventory. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

22 22 RFID and Fashion Smart Dressing Rooms One touch of the flat screen displays product information (material, price, care instruction) Also offers info on other available sizes and colors, suggestions Regarding apparel coordination (matching shirt displayed) UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

23 23 RFID and Fashion Smart Mirrors Smart mirrors are also located outside dressing rooms and provide similar product information, but do not include the touch screen found in dressing rooms. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

24 24 Social Retailing Smart Mirrors and Webcams  Walk into dressing room/mirror reflects your image  Also see images of apparel item and celebrities wearing the item on an interactive display  Webcam projects image on the website for everyone to view of the consumer modeling an item.  Creates interaction between consumers and their social network outside the store.  RFID antenna in dressing room and EPC RFID tags on apparel items enables the smart mirrors and webcams to communicate. UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved.

25 25 Awesome Consumer Uses UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. Microsoft, AT&T, and RFID Shoppers in New York, Atlanta, San Antonio and San Francisco had the chance to experience “Surface” in April “Surface” 30” table-like display During the pilot, Surface recognizes and displays information on 8 AT& T phones – including LG Shine, BlackBerry Curve, and Samsung BlackJack II. If the pilot goes well, plans are to deploy Surface at AT&T’s 2,200 retail stores in the U.S.

26 26 Awesome Consumer Use UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. Surgical Sponges Get Smart Human Implants The FDA has approved clinical trials for surgical sponges with passive RFID tags about the size of a shirt button. FDA approved the use of RFID chips for human implant with limited user data and restricted medical information.

27 27 Consumer Use in Everyday Line UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. High-Tech Recycle Bins Curves Fitness Center RFID Wrist bands offer computerized personal coaching system designing a precision workout with moment to moment feedback and a monthly report card. Texas Instruments is developing equipment for recycling trucks out-fitted with a weighing scale and RFID reader. Truck scans tag in your bin and tracks how much your are recycling per month. Households receive coupons/rewards based on how much they recycle.

28 28 Consumer Use in Everyday Line UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. Toll Tags or Auto Pass Public toll roads equipped with RFID payment systems, usually active tags, read numbers in vehicles as they pass through toll booth. Tag info is used to debit fee from a prepaid account. Mass Transit Typically a passive card would be used on public transportation buses and trains in a static “unchanging” situation. An active card would be used in crowded downtown areas with variable tolls charged.

29 29 Awesome Consumer Uses UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. “Internet of Things” According to Laurie Sullivan, Site Editor of RFID World, “Internet of Things” has come to describe technology and research disciplines that enables the internet to connect with physical objects (RFID, short- range wireless communications, and real-time localization and sensor networks)”. As they become increasingly common, the “Internet of Things” is brought into commercial use. Mobile devices will become “one” with the car. Consumers will download info from their phone to the car and from their car to their phone. =en&year=2005&issue+09

30 30 “Internet of Things” UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. BMW Leading the Way in Research Challenges BMW must overcome to succeed Create a safe environment for downloading/retrieving information. How to build a system that connects home servers, data, music, information, and a navigation system that adapts to mobile phone, car, home PC, and more. Semantic intelligence is needed. Privacy and security concerns are huge. RFID already exists to track your location, driving habits, keys that remotely open doors and start the car and keep track of goods brought into the car (such as food) and adjust the temperature of the car to keep the food cool.

31 31 Additional Resources UNT in partnership with TEA, Copyright © All rights reserved. Check out the Reference File attached to this presentation for a complete list of all websites used in this presentation as well as additional sources related to RFID. Check out the Vocabulary File attached to this presentation for a helpful list of vocabulary terms and phrases associated with RFID.


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