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5/7/20151 Critical Incidents, Collaboration, and Cyber-Reflection or What we don’t know is probably hurting us. Daniel J. Glisczinski, Ed.D. University.

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Presentation on theme: "5/7/20151 Critical Incidents, Collaboration, and Cyber-Reflection or What we don’t know is probably hurting us. Daniel J. Glisczinski, Ed.D. University."— Presentation transcript:

1 5/7/20151 Critical Incidents, Collaboration, and Cyber-Reflection or What we don’t know is probably hurting us. Daniel J. Glisczinski, Ed.D. University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. Daniel J. Glisczinski, Ed.D. University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A.

2 5/7/20152 “We teach to change the world” (Brookfield, 2000). We aim to create informed, scientific, humanistic, pluralistic, nuanced, contextual, thinkers decision makers citizens human beings We aim to create informed, scientific, humanistic, pluralistic, nuanced, contextual, thinkers decision makers citizens human beings D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

3 5/7/ As professionals, we have a great deal of…  Content knowledge: experts in fields  Curriculum control: teaching what and how we see fit  Exposure to best practices in teaching: access to learning theory  Scholarly colleagiality: wise, experienced colleagues And still, we suffer from a comparative dearth of…  Access to student insights:  To what extent are we changing our students’ worlds?  How  In what ways?  Content knowledge: experts in fields  Curriculum control: teaching what and how we see fit  Exposure to best practices in teaching: access to learning theory  Scholarly colleagiality: wise, experienced colleagues And still, we suffer from a comparative dearth of…  Access to student insights:  To what extent are we changing our students’ worlds?  How  In what ways? D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

4 5/7/ How might we gain access to student insights regarding key learning events in our courses?  Confernce with all students:  Impractical time-wise  Survey a random sample and analyze findings:  Limited by survey language  Administer standard course evaluations:  Do these questions speak to our transformative aims?  Utilize Wiki-based Critical Incident Questionnaires  Provide time and place for authentic student voices D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

5 5/7/ From A Vision of Students Today by M. Welch and students Kansas State University A Vision of Students Today D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

6 5/7/ Wiki ( “a Hawaiian language word meaning fast”--Wikipedia, 2007 ) Reminding:  A set of interconnected web pages that can be edited by multiple users (Wagner, 2004)  Software that enables open editing through a collaborative medium (Louridas, 2006; Watson & Harper, 2007)  Described by wiki creator (Cunningham, 2001) as an inherently democratic process, wikis enable any registered user to add, delete, or modify wiki content Maligning:  Wikipedia--the ubiquitous collaborative knowledge site featuring varying levels of accuracy Redefining for education:  Modular, Object-Oriented, Dynamic Learning Environment’s (Moodle’s) Wiki resource requires secure user authentication, limited to students actively enrolled in an course of study  Variety of other free wiki tools available (Wiki Spaces. PB Wiki, etc.) D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

7 5/7/ Why Wiki? Transparent, collaborative, knowledge construction: (constructivist assumptions)  Creating common site for all authenticated users to lurk, read  (noting connotations and assumptions of such behavior)  Hosting site for knowledge construction  (noting connotations and assumptions of each) D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

8 5/7/  Backward design: begin with end in mind  Secure collaboration: authentication desirable  Predictable technology function: does institution use C.M.S or other wiki tools (Moodle, for example)  Accessible: ubiquitous, proprietary, archivable  Pedagogically rich: integrative of other learning media Selecting a course-related Wiki D. Glisczinski |University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A.|

9 5/7/ Establishing a Wiki (via Moodle C.M.S) Source:

10 5/7/ Inviting Critical Reflection via Wiki tools Based on Brookfield’s (1995) Critical Incident Questionnaire (C.I.Q.) D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

11 5/7/ Creating Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ) Wiki Content Brookfield (1995) D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

12 5/7/ C.I.Q. Wiki edits (by course particpants)  40 out of 47 enrolled students  Authenticated and visited wiki site  90 authenticated visits over 10 days  75 C.I.Q. edits  No record of students modifying other participants’ text was found  Thematic analysis of 75 student C.I.Q. edits suggested the following major themes D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

13 5/7/ Student Insights: (Via Education Psychology C.I.Q. Wiki) D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

14 5/7/ Reflection on Student Insights: Thematic analysis (Via EdSe 4501 C.I.Q. Wiki) Students reported feeling most engaged when: being challenged to reflect on professional decisions with advanced notice in a community of peer support and gentle scrutiny Students reported feeling most distanced when: being pushed to reflect on professional decisions while their sense of confidence and efficacy were low Students found most affirming and helpful: receiving feedback on how they’re doing as learners Students found most puzzling or confusing: feeling that insufficient empathy is shown for their struggles as new professionals Students found most surprising: feeling strangely engaged by the uninvited burden of critical thinking D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

15 5/7/ Methods of Inquiry Population  UMD secondary school teaching licensure candidates Participants  40 education psychology students Qualitative Method:  Critical Incident Questionnaire (Brookfield, 1995)  Wiki data collection (via Moodle C.M.S) Wiki data collection  Phenomenological Analysis  Seeking essence of experience (Moustakas, 1994) Rationale  Insight into critical incidents may guide transformative pedagogies D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

16 5/7/ “We teach to change the world” (Brookfield, 2000). We aim to create informed, scientific, humanistic, pluralistic, nuanced, contextual, thinkers decision makers citizens human beings We aim to create informed, scientific, humanistic, pluralistic, nuanced, contextual, thinkers decision makers citizens human beings D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

17 5/7/ Discussion and feedback, please.

18 5/7/ Discussion and feedback, please.

19 5/7/  Appreciation for C.I.Q., Wiki tools, student candor  Data spoke to my research questions  Data suggest new questions to follow  Dissatisfaction with my research questions:  Discovered more blank spaces in critical places (Elmore, 2007)  “Ask better questions of our data,  Use data to ask better questions.” (Duneier, 2007) Discussion D. Glisczinski | University of Minnesota Duluth, U.S.A. |

20 5/7/ Transformative Learning Theory Mezirow (1970) and Herbers (1998) I. Disorienting Dilemmas: II. Critical Reflection: III. Rational Dialogue: IV. Action: More blank spaces in critical places (Elmore, 2007) What are students reporting about these in our curriculum and study together? Drafting of a second incident questionnaire. (I.I.Q.) More blank spaces in critical places (Elmore, 2007) What are students reporting about these in our curriculum and study together? Drafting of a second incident questionnaire. (I.I.Q.) Critical Incident Questionnaire (C.I.Q.) Brookfield (1995)

21 5/7/  Morph C.I.Q. into I.I.Q. (pronounced “ick”--as in disagreeable or dissonant sound)  More intentionally inquire into four quadrants characteristic of perspective transformation  Cognitive dissonance of disorienting experiences  Critical reflection on assumptions that contribute to dissonance  Rational dialogue on alternative perspectives  Directed action consonant with new understandings Discussion

22 5/7/ Intense Incident Questionnaire (I.I.Q. --pronounced “ick” ) 1. What event(s) associated with this course have troubled your thinking or caused you cognitive distress? 2. What assumptions, beliefs, or perspectives about learning have you or others held that have contributed to this distress? 3. What other assumptions, beliefs, or perspectives about learning may suggest value in proceeding otherwise? 4. In what ways does what you think know affect and inform your choices and behavior? (Glisczinski, 2007) DRAFT

23 5/7/  Curiosities:  How to proceed with analysis of transformative possibility in own courses without pressing on egomaniacally?  Does studying one’s own courses in this manner contaminate results?  What better options might I consider? Discussion

24 5/7/ Maslow (1971) Our work is to develop individuals who “are able to face tomorrow... with confidence enough in [themselves, that they] will be able to improvise in that situation which has never happened” (p. 57). “ When I graduate, I will probably have a job that does not even exist today. I am one of the lucky ones. Over one billion people make less than one dollar a day. I did not invent these problems, but they are my problems.” ( ). K.S.U. Students (2007) with M. Welch

25 5/7/ Research Questions 1. Which scaffolded learning dilemmas were most effective in helping teacher candidates understand how to effectively use learning theory in support of meaningful student learning? 2. Which scaffolded learning dilemmas were least effective in helping teacher candidates understand how to effectively use learning theory in support of meaningful student learning?


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