Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Kristine Belknap.  Isaac Asimov  American Author  Best known for Science Fiction Short Stories    

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Kristine Belknap.  Isaac Asimov  American Author  Best known for Science Fiction Short Stories    "— Presentation transcript:

1 Kristine Belknap

2  Isaac Asimov  American Author  Best known for Science Fiction Short Stories    

3  Isaac Asimov  American Author  Best known for Science Fiction Short Stories  Liar! – Short Story – May 1941   Runaround – Short Story – March 1942 

4  Isaac Asimov  American Author  Best known for Science Fiction Short Stories  Liar! – Short Story – May 1941  First recorded use of the word “robotics”  Runaround – Short Story – March 1942 

5  Isaac Asimov  American Author  Best known for Science Fiction Short Stories  Liar! – Short Story – May 1941  First recorded use of the word “robotics”  Runaround – Short Story – March 1942  First explicit appearance of the Three Laws of Robotics

6 1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm

7 1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. 2. A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3.

8 1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. 2. A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

9  A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.  ▪

10  A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪

11  A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪ “What is a human being?” – Robot ▪

12  A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪ “What is a human being?” – Robot ▪ “What can injure or harm a human being?” – Robot

13  A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.  ▪  ▪

14  A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.  Issues (From the Human’s Perspective) ▪  ▪

15  A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.  Issues (From the Human’s Perspective) ▪ “How do I tell the Robot what I want it to do?” – Human  ▪

16  A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.  Issues (From the Human’s Perspective) ▪ “How do I tell the Robot what I want it to do?” – Human  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪

17  A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.  Issues (From the Human’s Perspective) ▪ “How do I tell the Robot what I want it to do?” – Human  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪ “What do I do if my orders conflict with the First Law?” – Robot

18  A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.  ▪

19  A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪

20  A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪ “What do I protect myself from?” – Robot ▪

21  A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪ “What do I protect myself from?” – Robot ▪ “How do I protect myself?” – Robot ▪

22  A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.  Issues (From the Robot’s Perspective) ▪ “What do I protect myself from?” – Robot ▪ “How do I protect myself?” – Robot ▪ “What do I do if protecting myself conflicts with one of or both of the first two laws?” – Robot

23  The First Law  The Second Law  The Third Law 

24  The First Law  Currently Impossible / Impractical Due to Technical Difficulties  The Second Law  The Third Law 

25  The First Law  Currently Impossible / Impractical Due to Technical Difficulties  The Second Law  With Some Limitations on What Commands Can be Given and on How Said Orders are Conveyed…  The Third Law 

26  The First Law  Currently Impossible / Impractical Due to Technical Difficulties  The Second Law  With Some Limitations on What Commands Can be Given and on How Said Orders are Conveyed…  The Third Law  Currently Impossible / Impractical Due to Technical Difficulties

27 Comments? Questions?


Download ppt "Kristine Belknap.  Isaac Asimov  American Author  Best known for Science Fiction Short Stories    "

Similar presentations


Ads by Google