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CHARLES UNIVERSITY IN PRAGUE faculty of mathematics and physics C# Language &.NET Platform 14 th Lecture Pavel Ježek

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Presentation on theme: "CHARLES UNIVERSITY IN PRAGUE faculty of mathematics and physics C# Language &.NET Platform 14 th Lecture Pavel Ježek"— Presentation transcript:

1 CHARLES UNIVERSITY IN PRAGUE faculty of mathematics and physics C# Language &.NET Platform 14 th Lecture Pavel Ježek Some of the slides are based on University of Linz.NET presentations. © University of Linz, Institute for System Software, 2004 published under the Microsoft Curriculum License (http://www.msdnaa.net/curriculum/license_curriculum.aspx)

2 “Counter-example”: Iterating Over a Tree class Node { public Node left; public Node right; public int value; public Node(Node left, Node right, int value) { this.left = left; this.right = right; this.value = value; } public Node(int value) : this(null, null, value) { } public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() { if (left != null) { foreach (int x in left) { yield return x; } yield return value; if (right != null) { foreach (int x in right) { yield return x; } class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { Node root = new Node( new Node( new Node(2), new Node(7), 5 ), new Node( new Node( new Node(14), new Node(17), 15 ), new Node(25), 20 ), 10 ); foreach (int x in root) { Console.Write("{0} ", x); } Console.WriteLine(); } Generates new enumerator for each node in the tree!

3 Collection Classes.NET 1.0, 1.1 based on System.Object System.Collections namespace.NET 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 generic classes System.Collections.Generic namespace

4 Interface ICollection : IEnumerable Interface ICollection : IEnumerable, IEnumerable Interface ICollection : IEnumerable Interface ICollection : IEnumerable, IEnumerable Basic interface for collections: New in ICollection : int Count { get; } number of elements bool IsSynchronized {get;} collection synchronised? object SyncRoot {get;} returns object for synchronisation void CopyTo(Array a, int index); copies the elements into array (starting at position index) void Add(T item); bool Remove(T item); void Clear(); bool Contains(T item;

5 Interface IList : ICollection, IEnumerable Interface IList : ICollection, IEnumerable, IEnumerable Interface IList : ICollection, IEnumerable Interface IList : ICollection, IEnumerable, IEnumerable Interface for object collections with a defined order interface IList { object this [ int index ] {get; set;} int Add(object value); void Insert(int index,object value); void Remove(object value); void RemoveAt(int index); void Clear(); bool Contains(object value); … }

6 Interface IDictionary Interface IDictionary Interface IDictionary Interface IDictionary interface IDictionary : ICollection, IEnumerable { ICollection Keys {get;}; ICollection Values {get;}; object this[object key] {get; set;} void Add(object key, object value); void Remove(object key); bool Contains(object key); IDictionaryEnumerator GetEnumerator(); … } interface IDictionary : IDictionary, ICollection >, IEnumerable >,... { … } public struct DictionaryEntry { public DictionaryEntry (object key, object value); public object Key {get;}; public object Value {get;}; }

7 Namespace System.Collections.Generic Classes List SortedList Dictionary SortedDictionary Stack Queue LinkedList HashSet SortedSet Interfaces ICollection IList IDictionary ISet IEnumerable IEnumerator IComparable IComparer IEquatable IEqualityComparer implemented as a reallocated T[] (corresponds to ArrayList) implemented as a pair of realloc. T[], U[] (corr. to SortedList) implemented as a hash table in an array (corr. to Hashtable) implemented as a red-black tree implemented in a reallocated T[] (corresponds to Stack) implemented as a circular queue in r. T[] (corresponds to Queue) doubly linked list of LinkedListNode (new in.NET 2.0) implemented as a hash table in an array + provides quick set operations (new in.NET implements ISet in 4.0) implemented as a red-black tree (new in.NET 4.0) (new in.NET 4.0)

8 CLI Type Inheritance System.Object (C# keyword: object ) user-defined classes (C# keyword: class ) delegates (C# keyword: delegate ) pointers (C#: Type * ) System.Delegate System.MulticastDelegate System.ValueType System.Enum System.Array arrays (C#: Type[] or Type[,] ) System.String (C# keyword: string ) interfaces (C# keyword: interface ) user-defined structures (C# keyword: struct ) enumerations (C# keyword: enum ) System.Int32 (C# keyword: int ) System.Int64 (C# keyword: long ) System.Double (C# keyword: double ) System.Boolean (C# keyword: bool ) … simple types System.Nullable (C#: Type? )

9 Delegate = Method Type Declaration of a delegate type delegate void Notifier (string sender);// ordinary method signature // with the keyword delegate Calling a delegate variable greetings("John");// invokes SayHello("John") => "Hello from John" Assigning a method to a delegate variable void SayHello(string sender) { Console.WriteLine("Hello from " + sender); } greetings = new Notifier(SayHello); Declaration of a delegate variable Notifier greetings;

10 Assigning Different Methods Every matching method can be assigned to a delegate variable void SayGoodBye(string sender) { Console.WriteLine("Good bye from " + sender); } greetings = new Notifier(SayGoodBye); greetings("John");// SayGoodBye("John") => "Good bye from John" Note A delegate variable can have the value null (no method assigned). If null, a delegate variable must not be called (otherwise exception). Delegate variables are first class objects: can be stored in a data structure, passed as a parameter, etc.

11 Creating a Delegate Value new DelegateType (obj.Method) A delegate variable stores a method and its receiver, but no parameters ! new Notifier(myObj.SayHello); obj can be this (and can be omitted) new Notifier(SayHello); Method can be static. In this case the class name must be specified instead of obj. new Notifier(MyClass.StaticSayHello); Method signature must match the signature of DelegateType -same number of parameters -same parameter types (including the return type) -same parameter kinds (ref, out, value)

12 Simplified Creation of Delegates delegate void Printer(string s); void Foo(string s) { Console.WriteLine(s); } Printer print; print = new Printer(this.Foo); print = this.Foo; print = Foo; simplified form: delegate type is infered from the type of the left-hand side delegate double Function(double x); double Foo(double x) { return x * x; } Printer print = Foo; Function square = Foo; assigns Foo(string s) assigns Foo(double x) overloading is resolved using the type of the left-hand side

13 Multicast Delegates A delegate variable can hold multiple values at the same time Notifier greetings; greetings = new Notifier(SayHello); greetings += new Notifier(SayGoodBye); greetings("John");// "Hello from John" // "Good bye from John" greetings -= new Notifier(SayHello); greetings("John");// "Good bye from John" Note If the multicast delegate is a function, the value of the last call is returned If the multicast delegate has an out parameter, the parameter of the last call is returned. ref-Parameter are passed through all methods.

14 Delegates Are Immutable

15 Delegate Variance

16 Generic Delegates delegate bool Check (T value); class Payment { public DateTime date; public int amount; } class Account { ArrayList payments = new ArrayList(); public void Add(Payment p) { payments.Add(p); } public int AmountPayed(Check matches) { int val = 0; foreach (Payment p in payments) if (matches(p)) val += p.amount; return val; } bool PaymentsAfter(Payment p) { return DateTime.Compare(p.date, myDate) >= 0; }... myDate = new DateTime(2001, 11, 9); int val = account.AmountPayed(new Check (PaymentsAfter)); A check method is passed, which checks for every Payment, whether it is eligible

17 Delegate Variance

18 Standard Delegates public delegate void Action()... public delegate void Action (T1 arg1, T2 arg2, T3 arg3)... public delegate TResult Func ()... public delegate TResult Func (T1 arg1, T2 arg2)... public delegate bool Predicate (T obj )

19 Events

20 Ordinary Delegates class C { int sum = 0; void SumUp(Node p) { sum += p.value; } void Print(Node p) { Console.WriteLine(p.value); } void Foo() { List list = new List(); list.ForAll(SumUp); list.ForAll(Print); } requires the declaration of a named method (SumUp, Print,...) SumUp and Print cannot access the local variables of Foo => sum must be declared as a global field delegate void Visitor(Node p); class List { Node[] data =...;... public void ForAll(Visitor visit) { for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++) visit(data[i]); }

21 Anonymous Methods delegate void Visitor(Node p); class C { void Foo() { List list = new List(); int sum = 0; list.ForAll(delegate (Node p) { Console.WriteLine(p.value); }); list.ForAll(delegate (Node p) { sum += p.value; }); } method code is specified in-place does not require the declaration of a named method anonymous method can access Foo's local variable sum return terminates the anonymous method (not the enclosing method) formal parametercode class List {... public void ForAll(Visitor visit) {... } Restrictions anonymous methods must not have formal parameters of the kind params T[] anonymous methods must not be assigned to object anonymous methods must not access ref or out parameters of the enclosing method

22 Further Simplification Button button = new Button(); Button.Click += delegate (object sender, EventArgs arg) { Console.WriteLine("clicked"); }; Can be simplified as follows Button.Click += delegate { Console.WriteLine("clicked"); }; Formal parameters can be omitted if they are not used in the method body Restriction Formal parameters can only be omitted if the delegate type does not have out parameters delegate void EventHandler (object sender, EventArgs arg);

23 Outer Variables If anonymous methods access variables of the enclosing method these variables are evacuated into a dummy object (capturing) – all anonymous methods and the enclosing method itself are then using a single “evacuated” variable (see next slide). delegate int Adder(); class Test { static Adder CreateAdder() { int x = 0; return delegate { x++; return x; }; } static void Main() { Adder add = CreateAdder(); Console.WriteLine(add()); } Output: x++; return x; 0 dummy object delegate (closure) add 123 The dummy object lives as long as the delegate object Anonymous methods in C# always exist only as closures, never as “lambda functions” with free variables (open bindings)!

24 Example delegate void MyDelegate(); class Program { static MyDelegate Foo() { int x = 1; Console.WriteLine("Foo: x = {0}", x); MyDelegate d = delegate { x++; Console.WriteLine("delegate: x = {0}", x); }; d(); Console.WriteLine("Foo: x = {0}", x); MyDelegate d2 = delegate { x += 10; Console.WriteLine("second delegate: x = {0}", x); }; d2(); d(); Console.WriteLine("Foo: x = {0}", x); return d2; } static void Main(string[] args) { MyDelegate m; Console.WriteLine(“--- Main: (m = Foo())();"); (m = Foo())(); m(); Console.WriteLine(“--- Main: Foo()();"); Foo()(); m(); } --- Main: (m = Foo())(); Foo: x = 1 delegate: x = 2 delegate: x = 3 Foo: x = 3 second delegate: x = 13 delegate: x = 14 Foo: x = 14 second delegate: x = 24 second delegate: x = Main: Foo()(); Foo: x = 1 delegate: x = 2 delegate: x = 3 Foo: x = 3 second delegate: x = 13 delegate: x = 14 Foo: x = 14 second delegate: x = 24 second delegate: x = 44 Output:

25 Pavel Ježek C# 3.0 and.NET 3.5 Lambda Expressions Example of C# 2.0 anonymous method: class Program { delegate T BinaryOp (T x, T y); static void Method (BinaryOp op, T p1, T p2) { Console.WriteLine(op(p1, p2)); } static void Main() { Method(delegate(int a, int b) { return a + b; }, 1, 2); } C# 3.0 lambda expressions provide further simplification: class Program { delegate T BinaryOp (T x, T y); static void Method (BinaryOp op, T p1, T p2) { Console.WriteLine(op(p1, p2)); } static void Main() { Method((a, b) => a + b, 1, 2); }

26 Pavel Ježek C# 3.0 and.NET 3.5 Lambda Expressions (2) Expression or statement body Implicitly or explicitly typed parameters Examples: x => x + 1 // Implicitly typed, expression body x => { return x + 1; } // Implicitly typed, statement body (int x) => x + 1 // Explicitly typed, expression body (int x) => { return x + 1; } // Explicitly typed, statement body (x, y) => x * y // Multiple parameters () => Console.WriteLine() // No parameters A lambda expression is a value, that does not have a type but can be implicitly converted to a compatible delegate type delegate R Func (A arg); Func f1 = x => x + 1; // Ok Func f2 = x => x + 1; // Ok Func f3 = x => x + 1; // Error – double cannot be // implicitly converted to int

27 Pavel Ježek C# 3.0 and.NET 3.5 Lambda Expressions (2b) Expression or statement body Implicitly or explicitly typed parameters Examples: x => x + 1 // Implicitly typed, expression body x => { return x + 1; } // Implicitly typed, statement body (int x) => x + 1 // Explicitly typed, expression body (int x) => { return x + 1; } // Explicitly typed, statement body (x, y) => x * y // Multiple parameters () => Console.WriteLine() // No parameters A lambda expression is a value, that does not have a type but can be implicitly converted to a compatible delegate type delegate R Func (A arg); Func f1 = x => x + 1; // Ok Func f2 = x => x + 1; // Ok Func f3 = x => x + 1; // Error – double cannot be // implicitly converted to int Lambda expressions in C# always exist only as closures, and never as “lambda functions” with free variables (open bindings)!

28 Pavel Ježek C# 3.0 and.NET 3.5 Lambda Expressions (3) Lambda expressions participate in inference process of type arguments of generic methods In initial phase, nothing is inferred from arguments that are lambda expressions Following the initial phase, additional inferences are made from lambda expressions using an iterative process

29 Pavel Ježek C# 3.0 and.NET 3.5 Lambda Expressions (4) Generic extension method example: public class List : IEnumerable, … { … } public static class Sequence { public static IEnumerable Select ( this IEnumerable source, Func selector) { foreach (T element in source) yield return selector(element); } Calling extension method with lambda expression: List customers = GetCustomerList(); IEnumerable names = customers.Select(c => c.Name); Rewriting extension method call: IEnumerable names = Sequence.Select (customers, c => c.Name); T type argument is inferred to Customer based on source argument type Sequence.Select (customers, c => c.Name) c lambda expression argument type is infered to Customer Sequence.Select (customers, (Customer c) => c.Name) S type argument is inferred to string based on return value type of the lambda expression Sequence.Select (customers, (Customer c) => c.Name)


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