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Copyright © 2014 by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2014 by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill/Irwin."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2014 by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2 12-2 Key Concepts and Skills Know how to determine: –A firm’s cost of equity capital –A firm’s cost of debt –A firm’s overall cost of capital Understand pitfalls of overall cost of capital and how to manage them

3 12-3 Cost of Capital Basics The cost to a firm for capital funding = the return to the providers of those funds –The return earned on assets depends on the risk of those assets –A firm’s cost of capital indicates how the market views the risk of the firm’s assets –A firm must earn at least the required return to compensate investors for the financing they have provided –The required return is the same as the appropriate discount rate

4 12-4 Cost of Equity The cost of equity is the return required by equity investors given the risk of the cash flows from the firm Two major methods for determining the cost of equity - Dividend growth model - SML or CAPM Return to Quick Quiz

5 12-5 The Dividend Growth Model Approach Start with the dividend growth model formula and rearrange to solve for R E

6 12-6 Example: Dividend Growth Model Your company is expected to pay a dividend of $4.40 per share next year. (D 1 ) Dividends have grown at a steady rate of 5.1% per year and the market expects that to continue. (g) The current stock price is $50. (P 0 ) What is the cost of equity?

7 12-7 Example: Estimating the Dividend Growth Rate One method for estimating the growth rate is to use the historical average YearDividendPercent Change 20091.23 20101.30 20111.36 20121.43 20131.50 (1.30 – 1.23) / 1.23 = 5.7% (1.36 – 1.30) / 1.30 = 4.6% (1.43 – 1.36) / 1.36 = 5.1% (1.50 – 1.43) / 1.43 = 4.9% Average = (5.7 + 4.6 + 5.1 + 4.9) / 4 = 5.1%

8 12-8 Advantages and Disadvantages of Dividend Growth Model Advantage – easy to understand and use Disadvantages –Only applicable to companies currently paying dividends –Not applicable if dividends aren’t growing at a reasonably constant rate –Extremely sensitive to the estimated growth rate –Does not explicitly consider risk

9 12-9 The SML Approach Use the following information to compute the cost of equity –Risk-free rate, R f –Market risk premium, E(R M ) – R f –Systematic risk of asset, 

10 12-10 Example: SML Company’s equity beta = 1.2 Current risk-free rate = 7% Expected market risk premium = 6% What is the cost of equity capital?

11 12-11 Advantages and Disadvantages of SML Advantages –Explicitly adjusts for systematic risk –Applicable to all companies, as long as beta is available Disadvantages –Must estimate the expected market risk premium, which does vary over time –Must estimate beta, which also varies over time –Relies on the past to predict the future, which is not always reliable

12 12-12 Example: Cost of Equity Data: –Beta = 1.5 –Market risk premium = 9% –Current risk-free rate = 6%. –Analysts’ estimates of growth = 6% per year –Last dividend = $2. –Currently stock price =$15.65 –Using SML: R E = 6% + 1.5(9%) = 19.5% –Using DGM: R E = [2(1.06) / 15.65] +.06 = 19.55%

13 12-13 Cost of Debt The cost of debt = the required return on a company’s debt Method 1 = Compute the yield to maturity on existing debt Method 2 = Use estimates of current rates based on the bond rating expected on new debt The cost of debt is NOT the coupon rate

14 12-14 Example: Cost of Debt Current bond issue: –15 years to maturity –Coupon rate = 12% –Coupons paid semiannually –Currently bond price = $1,253.72 30N -1253.72PV 1000FV 60PMT CPT I/Y 4.45% YTM = 4.45%*2 = 8.9%

15 12-15 Component Cost of Debt Use the YTM on the firm’s debt Interest is tax deductible, so the after-tax (AT) cost of debt is: If the corporate tax rate = 40%: Return to Quick Quiz

16 12-16 Cost of Preferred Stock Preferred pays a constant dividend every period Dividends expected to be paid forever Preferred stock is a perpetuity Example: –Preferred annual dividend = $10 –Current stock price = $111.10 R P = 10 / 111.10 = 9%

17 12-17 Weighted Average Cost of Capital Use the individual costs of capital to compute a weighted “average” cost of capital for the firm This “average” = the required return on the firm’s assets, based on the market’s perception of the risk of those assets The weights are determined by how much of each type of financing is used Return to Quick Quiz

18 12-18 Determining the Weights for the WACC Weights = percentages of the firm that will be financed by each component Always use the target weights, if possible –If not available, use market values

19 12-19 Capital Structure Weights Notation E = market value of equity = # outstanding shares times price per share D = market value of debt = # outstanding bonds times bond price V = market value of the firm = D + E Weights E/V = percent financed with equity D/V = percent financed with debt Return to Quick Quiz

20 12-20 WACC WACC = (E/V) x R E + (P/V) x R P + (D/V) x R D x (1- T C ) Where: ( E/V) = % of common equity in capital structure (P/V) = % of preferred stock in capital structure (D/V) = % of debt in capital structure R E = firm’s cost of equity R P = firm’s cost of preferred stock R D = firm’s cost of debt T C = firm’s corporate tax rate Weights Component costs

21 12-21 Estimating Weights Given: Stock price = $50 3m shares common stock $25m preferred stock $75m debt 40% Tax rate Weights: E/V = $150/$250= 0.6 (60%) P/V = $25/$250 = 0.1 (10%) D/V = $75/$250 = 0.3 (30%) Component Values: V E = $50 x (3 m) = $150m V P = $25m V D = $75m V F = $150+$25+$75=$250m

22 12-22 WACC WACC = 0.6(14%) + 0.1(9%) + 0.3(10%)(1-.40) WACC = 8.4% + 0.9% + 1.8% = 11.1% ComponentWR Debt (before tax)0.3010% Preferred Stock0.109% Common equity0.6014% WACC = E/V x R E + P/V x R P + D/V x R D (1 - T C )

23 12-23 Table 12.1

24 12-24 Factors that Influence a Company’s WACC Market conditions, especially interest rates, tax rates and the market risk premium The firm’s capital structure and dividend policy The firm’s investment policy –Firms with riskier projects generally have a higher WACC

25 12-25 Eastman Chemical – 1 Equity Data Source: http://finance.yahoo.comhttp://finance.yahoo.com

26 12-26 Source: http://finance.yahoo.comhttp://finance.yahoo.com Eastman Chemical – 2 Dividend Growth

27 12-27 Eastman Chemical - 3 Beta and Shares Outstanding Source: http://finance.yahoo.comhttp://finance.yahoo.com

28 12-28 Eastman Chemical - 4 Dividends Source: http://finance.yahoo.comhttp://finance.yahoo.com

29 12-29 Eastman Chemical - 5 Cost of Equity - SML Beta:Yahoo Finance2.31 Value Line1.25 (1.25 is a more reasonable value) T-Bill rate = 0.05% ( Yahoo Finance bonds section) Market Risk Premium = 7% (assumed) Cost of Equity (SML) = 0.05% + (7%)(1.25) = 8.80%

30 12-30 Eastman Chemical - 6 Cost of Equity - DCF Growth rate7.67% Last dividend$1.04 Stock price $53.74 Cost of Equity (DCF) =

31 12-31 Eastman Chemical - 7 Cost of Equity Cost of Equity MethodEstimated Value SML8.80% DCF9.75% Average9.28%

32 12-32 Eastman Chemical - 8 Bond Data Source: http://www.sec.govhttp://www.sec.gov

33 12-33 Eastman Chemical - 9 Cost of Debt For Eastman, the cost of debt is similar when using either book values or market values.

34 12-34 Capital structure weights (market values): E = 136.92 million x $53.74 = $7.358 billion D = 1.661 billion V = $7.358 + 1.661 = 9.019 billion E/V = 7.358 / 9.019 =.82 D/V = 1.661 / 9.019 =.18 Tax rate (assumed) = 35% WACC =.82(9.28%) +.18(3.81%)(1-.35) = 8.02% Eastman Chemical - 10 WACC

35 12-35 Risk-Adjusted WACC A firm’s WACC reflects the risk of an average project undertaken by the firm –“Average”  risk = the firm’s current operations Different divisions/projects may have different risks –The division’s or project’s WACC should be adjusted to reflect the appropriate risk and capital structure Return to Quick Quiz

36 12-36 Using WACC for All Projects What would happen if we use the WACC for all projects regardless of risk? Assume the WACC = 15%

37 12-37 Using WACC for All Projects Assume the WACC = 15% A project’s required return is calculated using the SML and the project’s Beta Adjusting for risk changes the decisions

38 12-38 Divisional Risk & the Cost of Capital

39 12-39 Pure Play Approach Find one or more companies that specialize in the product or service being considered Compute the beta for each company Take an average Use that beta along with the CAPM to find the appropriate return for a project of that risk Pure play companies can be difficult to find Return to Quick Quiz

40 12-40 Subjective Approach Consider the project’s risk relative to the firm overall –If the project is riskier than the firm, use a discount rate greater than the WACC –If the project is less risky than the firm, use a discount rate less than the WACC Return to Quick Quiz

41 12-41 Subjective Approach - Example Risk LevelDiscount Rate Very Low RiskWACC – 8% 6% Low RiskWACC – 4% 10% Same Risk as FirmWACC 14% High RiskWACC + 6% 20% Very High RiskWACC + 10% 24%

42 12-42 Quick Quiz What are the two approaches for computing the cost of equity? (Slide 12.5)Slide 12.5 How do you compute the cost of debt and the after tax cost of debt? (Slide 12.16)Slide 12.16 How do you compute the capital structure weights required for the WACC? (Slide 12.20)Slide 12.20 What is the WACC? (Slide 12.18)Slide 12.18 What happens if we use the WACC as the discount rate for all projects? (Slide 12.36)Slide 12.36 What are two methods that can be used to compute the appropriate discount rate when WACC isn’t appropriate? (Slide 12.40 and Slide 12.41)Slide 12.40Slide 12.41

43 Chapter 12 END 12-43


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