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Paula Jensen Industrial Engineering Instructor ENGM 625.

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Presentation on theme: "Paula Jensen Industrial Engineering Instructor ENGM 625."— Presentation transcript:

1 Paula Jensen Industrial Engineering Instructor ENGM 625

2 Technology Ventures: From Idea to EnterpriseChapter 1: Summary There are risks and costs to a program of action. But they are far less than the long-range risks and costs of comfortable inaction. John F. Kennedy What drives global entrepreneurship? The entrepreneur provides the creative force in order for capitalism (free enterprise) to work. Entrepreneurs strive to make a difference in our world and contribute to its betterment. They are also motivated by achievement, independence, and the accumulation of wealth. Summary Economic Growth & the Technology Entrepreneur 1

3 Chapter 1: Figure Finding the Right Opportunity Timely Solvable Important Profitable Favorable Context Like to do the tasks Like the challenge Committed to do what is necessary Skilled at the needed tasks The Sweet Spot An Attractive Opportunity Interests, Passions, Commitment Capabilities & Skills Finding the Right Opportunity Economic Growth & the Technology Entrepreneur 1 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

4 Chapter 1: Figure 1.5 Waves of innovation throughout history Economic Growth & the Technology Entrepreneur 1 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

5 Chapter 1: concept Dynamic Capitalism is the process of wealth creation characterized by the dynamics of new, creative firms forming and growing and old, large firms declining and failing. Creative Destruction is the entrepreneurial activity of destroying old models and creating new models of doing business. Economic Growth & the Technology Entrepreneur 1 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

6 Chapter 2: Summary In the field of observation, chance only favors minds which are prepared. Louis Pasteur How can an entrepreneur identify and select a valuable opportunity? The choice of an opportunity and the decision to act is a critical juncture in the life of an entrepreneur. With the decision to act, the entrepreneur prepares a business summary for the venture that is used to test the new venture with potential investors, employees, and customers. Summary Opportunity and the Concept Summary 2

7 Chapter 2: Figure 2.1 Six steps to acting as an entrepreneur Opportunity and the Concept Summary 2 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

8  Increase value of a product or service  New applications of existing technologies  Creating mass markets  Customization for individuals  Increasing reach  Managing the supply chain  Process innovation  Increasing the scale of the firm

9  Capabilities: is it consistent with mission, knowledge base ?  Novelty: does product have sufficient differentiating qualities that it creates value for the customer ?  Resources: are the available resources sufficient for the venture ?  Return: is expected return consistent with the risk of the venture ?  Commitment: is the entrepreneurial team sufficiently passionate about the venture that they can commit ?

10 Chapter 2: concept Types of Opportunity : Opportunity Pull: the size of the opportunity attracts opportunity seekers to attempt to exploit it. Example: A drug to mitigate the effect of Alzheimer’s disease. Opportunity and the Concept Summary 2 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

11 Chapter 2: concept Types of Opportunity : Capability Push: a new technology or capability causes a search for new applications. Example: Digital Television Opportunity and the Concept Summary 2 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

12 Team: accept risk knowledge base commitment Opportunity: novelty potential market good risk vs reward Context: timeliness industry conditions market conditions Resources: financial processes human 100% 50%

13 Team: accept risk knowledge base commitment Opportunity: novelty potential market good risk vs reward Context: timeliness industry conditions market conditions Resources: financial processes human 100% 50% Holiday Inn

14 Team: accept risk knowledge base commitment Opportunity: novelty potential market good risk vs reward Context: timeliness industry conditions market conditions Resources: financial processes human 100% 50% Electric Auto

15  Microtrends vs MegaTrends  MicroTrends ◦ Mark J. Penn --Pollster ◦ Single Women Head of House Record ◦ Soccer Moms decrease ◦ Women majority of Car buyers ◦ Men majority of Truck Buyers ◦ Majority of purchasing power is 49 plus

16  Micro Trends – Mark Penn YouTube Video Micro Trends – Mark Penn YouTube Video

17  Consumers  Existing Companies ◦ can we improve existing products  Distribution Channels ◦ distributors keenly aware of market trends  Federal Government ◦ Patent Office (Official Gazette) ◦ Regulations (OSHA)  Research & Development ◦ Ken Olsen

18  Focus Groups ◦ 8-12 market group conceptualize new product need  Brainstorming ◦ structured  central question is stated  each member gives idea in turn (no criticism)  ideas written on flip chart  ideas generated until all members pass  review written list for clarity and discard duplicates ◦ unstructured

19  Variations to Brainstorming ◦ visual brainstorming ◦ analogies/free-word association ◦ method  6 people 5 minutes 3 ideas  pass sheets of 3 ideas to the right  5 minutes 3 ideas which build on first 3  complete 6 rotations (or as many as there are members)

20  Nominal Group Technique (NGT) ◦ generate list of ideas (brainstorm) ◦ each member rank orders ideas highest to lowest ◦ idea with highest total score gets worked on first ◦ Variations  One half plus one; eliminate half at a time until arrive at a manageable number  Multivoting; rate each idea on scale of 1 to 100  Problem Inventory Analysis ◦ easier to relate to known products and criticize to arrive at a new product idea

21  Checklist Method ◦ modify, adapt, put to other uses, substitute,...  Free Association ◦ similar to brainstorming - create chain of ideas  Forced Relationships ◦ Isolate elements of a problem ◦ Find relationships between elements ◦ Record relationships in an orderly form ◦ Analyze relationships to find ideas or patterns ◦ Develop new ideas from patterns

22  Collective Notebook ◦ record ideas 1-3 times daily in pocket notebook  Heuristics  Scientific method (not very creative) ◦ Define problem ◦ Generate alternatives ◦ Analyze data ◦ Choose best alternative ◦ Implement ◦ Evaluate

23  Value Analysis ◦ maximize value by constructively skimping  Attribute Listing ◦ list attributes of a problem ◦ e.g. SD has little economic development, what types of industry/products/services do well here  Matrix Charting ◦ similar to house of quality

24  Big-Dream Approach ◦ ideas should be conceptualized without constraints  Parameter Analysis ◦ 2 aspects, parameter identification & creative synthesis Technology Observation Need Analysis Parameter identification Creative synthesis Realization Market Need New Product

25 t Introduction Growth Maturity Decline

26 t Idea Concept Develop Test Market EVALUATE

27  Evaluation of market demand is most important criterion of a proposed new product idea  Competing producers, prices, and marketing strategies should be evaluated  New product compatible with existing management  New product should contribute to company’s financial structure  New product compatible with existing facilities

28  Idea Stage ◦ each new idea expressed in terms of values & benefits ◦ consumers presented with cluster of ideas determine which should be pursued ◦ Table 4.4 & 4.5  Concept Stage ◦ refined product idea tested to determine consumer acceptance ◦ conversational interview - consumers respond to statements that reflect product attributes, quality, reliability, price, promotion, distribution

29  Product Development Stage ◦ consumer reaction to physical product is determined ◦ consumer panel tracks use of product ◦ consumer panel records virtues, deficiencies of product and competing products  Test Marketing Stage ◦ New Coke

30 Technology Ventures: From Idea to EnterpriseChapter 3: Summary Success in any enterprise requires the right product, methods, and workers, and each must complement the others. Joseph Burger How do successful entrepreneurs create a compelling business design for their new ventures? To design a new business, the entrepreneur must cogently and clearly describe the customers and their needs and how the new venture will satisfy those needs. Summary Vision and the Business Model 3

31  Create a vision  Mission statement  State the value proposition  Create the business model  Describe the core competencies & competitive advantage  Act

32  Clarity  Consistency  Uniqueness  Purposeful We strive to preserve and improve life through the innovation of biomedical devices while supporting, training, and inspiring our employees so that individual ability and creativity is leased and rewarded. Our goal is to be the leader in our industry by 2006 and be widely known throughout the world.

33 Chapter 3: Table Elements of a Mission Statement A mission statement is a description of the course of action to implement the vision. Core Values Customers and/or Stakeholders Products Competitive Advantage Values Provided to Customer Markets or Industry Possible elements of a mission statement Vision and the Business Model 3 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise Ex. Our mission is to design and manufacture electronic devices that serve the needs of the aerospace industry on a timely basis and at reasonable prices.

34 Chapter 3: Concept The Value Proposition defines the company to the customer. Vision and the Business Model 3 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

35 Chapter 3: Table 3.6 The Value Proposition defines the company to the customer. Five values offered to a customer 1.Product: Performance, quality, features, brand, selection, search, easy to use, safe 2.Price: Fair, visible, consistent, and reasonable 3.Access: Convenient, location, nearby, at-hand, easy to find, in a reasonable time 4.Service: Ordering, delivery, return, check-out 5.Experience: Emotional, respect, ambiance, fun, intimacy, relationships, community Vision and the Business Model 3 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

36 Chapter 3: concept The Unique Selling Proposition is a short version of firm’s value proposition. Example: Intel has a USP: The best product with great service. Example of a value proposition: Intel offers product as their primary value and service as their secondary value. Vision and the Business Model 3 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

37 Chapter 3: Table 3.8 Elements of A Business Model Vision and the Business Model 3 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

38 Chapter 3: Table 3.9 Customer Selection: High Relevance Four Segments: Corporate, Government, Education, Consumer.Value Proposition: Unique Benefits A customized computer at a good price with great service readily accessible via phone or the Internet.Differentiation and control: Sustainable competitive advantage Customized products via a direct sales channel on the phone or Internet with strong service and customer relationships.Scope of Product and Activities Desktop, laptop, and servers. Strong supply chain management.Organizational Design Divisional organization for each customer segment.Value Capture for Profit Opportunities for cross-sell and up-sell. Avoid price as the key value and focus on service and accessibility.Value for Talent: Learn, Grow, Prosper Training, Learning, and Career Opportunities. Dell Computer Business Model Vision and the Business Model 3 Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

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40  Customer selection  Value proposition  Differentiation  Scope of product/activities  Organizational design  Value capture for profit  Value for talent

41  Customer Corp, Govt, Ed, Indiv  Valuecustomized computer  Differentiation direct sales, service  Scopedesktops, laptops, servers  Organizationdivisional by customer seg  Value capturefocus on service, access  Value for talentcareer opportunities

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43 Core competency of Google is the design and operation of a software search engine. It is the dominant online search engine. While starting as a search tool for finding information on diverse subjects, it has also become a tool for people searching for an online site selling a product of interest.

44  High qualityToyota  ServiceStarbucks  PriceWal-Mart  Mrkt SegmentDell  Product BreadthAmazon  InnovationMedtronic  Intellectual Prop. MicroSoft


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