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WWW.NCEE.ORG.UK Since 2004 we have extended how we work across HE and FE, starting with our Flying Start Programme for students and now supporting senior.

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Presentation on theme: "WWW.NCEE.ORG.UK Since 2004 we have extended how we work across HE and FE, starting with our Flying Start Programme for students and now supporting senior."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Since 2004 we have extended how we work across HE and FE, starting with our Flying Start Programme for students and now supporting senior management, industry partners, academic staff and graduates. Our new name, the National Centre for Entrepreneurship in Education, is a more accurate reflection of what we now do to stimulate and encourage a more entrepreneurial education sector and to create the opportunities for more graduates and learners to develop the capacities they need for an entrepreneurial future. We deliver innovative learning opportunities across 3 core areas: (1) Leadership and Management; (2) Academic Entrepreneurship; (3) Graduate Entrepreneurship

3 Danish Entrepreneurship Awards Panel Debate Professor Paul Hannon, Chief Executive 14 th November 2012

4 Key Questions How can higher education support entrepreneurial skills and what are your experiences in creating entrepreneurship excellence in education, please give practical examples. Which university internationally, would you highlight in terms of entrepreneurial activities and why. How can policies support best practice in the area? What are the main barriers and challenges in creating an entrepreneurial university? If you could remove one barrier, which one would it be? How do we get from pilot projects to best practice and how can we use each other’s experiences in a constructive manner? How do we benchmark best practice in entrepreneurship education? Do we need new instruments/approaches? Please give practical examples. What can we do today? Name your top three low-hanging fruits.

5 Can we ‘make’ entrepreneurial graduates? NO!! But we can create the conditions that are conducive for entrepreneurial graduates to emerge and develop And which conditions? We need to start at the end not the beginning …………. What are we seeking to achieve?

6 Broadening our Conceptualisation Entrepreneurship as different ‘ways of ……..’ Doing Seeing Behaving Organising Communicating Learning A STATE OF BEING Gibb / NCEE

7 Entrepreneurial Learning Outcomes A.Key entrepreneurial behaviours, skills and attitudes have been developed B.Learners clearly empathise with, understand and ‘feel’ the life-world of the entrepreneur C.Key entrepreneurial values have been embedded D.Motivation towards an entrepreneurial career has been built and learners clearly understand the comparative benefits E.Learners understand the processes (stages) of creating new ventures, the associated tasks and learning needs F.Learners have the key generic competencies associated with entrepreneurship G.Learners have a grasp of key business how to’s associated with the start up process H.Learners understand the nature of the relationships they need to develop with key stakeholders and are familiarised with them Gibb / NCEE

8 QAA Guidance, UK (2012)

9 A Whole Organisation Approach Not just about being only good at commercialising research or graduate start-ups and spin outs: – About how a university becomes an entrepreneurial organisation – and creates an organisation that is globally competitive in uncertain, unpredictable and complex environments; – About creating the ecosystem conditions under which all students and staff are given the opportunity and support to develop entrepreneurial capacities – ways of thinking, behaving and doing A SHIFT OF EMPHASIS FROM GRADUATE ENTREPRENEURS TO ENTREPRENEURIAL GRADUATES - and staff! – across all subjects and disciplines

10 Guiding Framework for the Entrepreneurial University (DRAFT 2012) INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXT 1. Strategy and governance 2. Resources and infrastructure 3. Recruitment, human resource development and incentives ENTREPRENEURIAL CHALLENGES AND OUTCOMES 4. Entrepreneurship teaching support 5. Graduate start-up support 6. University-business relations/external linkages for knowledge exchange 7. The entrepreneurial university as a dynamic, proactive organisation

11 How can policies support best practice in the area? 1.Creating an entrepreneurial institution 1.Leadership vision and direction 2.Embedded in policies, structures, practices 2.Creating learning environments for entrepreneurship 1.Relevance and autonomy 2.Rewards and incentives 3.Staff support and CPD 4.Student-led 3.Synergies 1.Mission, strategy and governance 2.Knowledge exchange 3.Internationalisation 4.Entrepreneurship education

12 How can higher education support entrepreneurial skills and what are your experiences in creating entrepreneurship excellence in education, please give practical examples. Create the institutional conditions in which the espoused learning outcomes can be achieved, enhanced, recognised and rewarded – in staff and students Shift of emphasis from what as content to how as pedagogy Shift of emphasis from entrepreneur to entrepreneurial Apply across all disciplines – notions of relevance Institutional challenges of leadership, academic staff Visionary leadership: ASU / Northampton / Coventry Stakeholder Engagement: Teesside / Plymouth / Nottingham Transdisciplinarity: ASU / Strathclyde Curriculum innovation: Queen’s / Hertfordshire

13 Some examples Arizona State University Strong visible leadership/opportunity-driven/solution-centred – societal transformation Newcastle, England; Wales Use of small curricula development funds to stimulate change Coventry Holistic approach for all employees Queen’s; Salford Recognition of extra-curricula effort through academic credits Kaospilots, Denmark Driven by a strong culture/value: head, heart and hands Nottingham/Coventry Links into local authorities/city communities

14 Cambridge, England Entrepreneurial ecosystem Stanford Ecorner: videos/podcasts; STVP hosted at Engineering School; Stanford Entrepreneurship Network – global community building Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Faculty Fellows Programme; Entrepreneurship Opportunity Fund for staff/students; Entrepreneurship Affiliates Programme for faculty/administrators; Scholars-in-Residence Kauffman Foundation Cross-campus initiative: top support; matched funding; campus-wide impact SIFE Global approach: 47 countries; 1500 universities; social transformation

15 What are the main barriers and challenges in creating an entrepreneurial university? If you could remove one barrier, which one would it be? Leadership Conceptualisations / language / shared meanings Educational / curriculum reform Fear of failure / transformation? Strategy / Positioning Organisational re-design? Academic and Stakeholder relevance and autonomy One barrier?

16 The organizational frameworks we call universities have not been designed to accommodate change on the scale we are witnessing or the attendant increases in complexity. Organizational constraints prevent them from realizing their entrepreneurial potential. In our effort to produce abstract knowledge without regard for its impact, many universities have lost sight of the fact that they are also institutions with the capacity to create products and processes and ideas with entrepreneurial potential. The only way to move forward is to replace what you have with something better—to innovate and to create new technologies and products and processes that replace those that already exist. We must accelerate the pace of our academic culture to move in sync with the needs of the world. And the ultimate driver is competition. Building an Entrepreneurial University (Crow)

17 What can we do today? Name your top three low-hanging fruits. There is much we can change!

18 INSTITUTION CONCEPT INSTITUTION ORGANISATION INSTITUTION STRATEGY INSTITUTION STAKEHOLDER/ COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT INSTITUTION CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY DEVELOPMENT WHAT DO YOU WANT TO CHANGE? WHAT CAN YOU CHANGE? AND HOW? Source: Prof Allan Gibb

19 “My greatest challenge has been to change the mindset of people. We see things the way our minds have instructed our eyes to see.” Muhammad Yunus, MD, Grameen Bank

20 CONTACT US


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