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Franci Davila and Emma Sajben Educational Studies Program Trinity College, Hartford, CT April 2009 Parent/Community Resources in Hartford Public School.

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Presentation on theme: "Franci Davila and Emma Sajben Educational Studies Program Trinity College, Hartford, CT April 2009 Parent/Community Resources in Hartford Public School."— Presentation transcript:

1 Franci Davila and Emma Sajben Educational Studies Program Trinity College, Hartford, CT April 2009 Parent/Community Resources in Hartford Public School Reform Spring 2009 Internship Summary

2 How could parents be involved in facilitating their children’s academic achievement? 2 “It’s not about the happy-meter of adults” Parents > mom + dad Parent involvement ≠ parent satisfaction Home-effect highly predictive of student achievement (Appx1)

3 Multi-tiered approach: inclusive of various stakeholders yielding a wide range of responses Response rate by schools (Appx2) 3 Qualitative & quantitative data District documents Interviews with Central Administrators Community Organizations Focus group of parents & parent leaders Parent survey

4 4 388 out of 1200 returned Response rate: 32.2% Distributed to 4 schools 4 OPMAD – Schools PTO Presidents Non-representative sample

5 Central resources provided by the district to support student achievement Welcome Center Percent of parents who have never received information from the Welcome Center (Appx3) 5 Mediator between the district and the schools Limited resources to establish a systemic family- school/district relationship 55.8% of surveyed parents do not know of the Welcome Center (Appx3)

6 What resources are available at the school level? F(amily)R(esource)A(id) P(arent)T(eacher)O(rganiza tion) 6 FRA does not provide consistent resources across different schools (Appx4.1) The wide range of responsibilities shift the focus from family/community engagement Parents affiliated with the PTO tend to be more informed of district policies (Appx4.2) Could be a good channel for communicating with parents but this relationship lacks trust and is inconsistent

7 What resource do parents use at the school level? 7 Teachers - 78% of parents turn to the teacher when a problem occurs - First and only access point for parents in the schools - Teachers’ primary focus is student achievement and cannot be expected to be the primary resource for parents

8 How do community organizations facilitate parents in supporting student achievement? 8 Provide supplementary services that the district is unable to provide Serve as an agent for Parental Engagement OPMAD parents are more likely to volunteer (46%) than other parents (34%) Weak district-community partnership few initiatives need to update CO-database

9 Implication #1 9 More effective ways of connecting parents with resources to support their child`s achievement

10 Implication #2 10 Re-establishment of “relational trust” (Bryk & Schneider*) Community Organizations (e.g.: panel discussion, conference on shared responsibility, cooperation) Parents (e.g.: newspaper column, blog, suggestion box etc.) PTO (e.g.: more frequent attendance at monthly meetings) *Bryk, A. & Schneider, B. (2002) Trust in schools: A core resource for improvement. New York: Russell Sage Foundation

11 Implication #3 11 More transparent structure of family/community engagement Comer model – a compelling, well-researched structural model (Appx6) Basic structure: three-level system of interconnected teams involving teachers, parents and administrators HPS piecemeal elements (e.g.: future SGCs, PTO, FRA) Guiding principals: no fault principle, consensus decision-making, collaboration

12 Implication #4 12 There’s a need for a consistent, concerted vision for family/community outreach

13 Appendix #1 - References 13 Abt Associates. (2001). National evaluation of family support programs. Final report volume B: Research studies. Cambridge, MA: Abt Associates. Barton, A. C., Drake, C., Perez, J. G., St.Louis, K., & George, M. (2004). Ecologies of Parental Engagement in Urban Education. Educational Researcher, 33, 3-12. Comer, J. P. & Haynes, N. M. (1991). Parent involvement in schools: An ecological approach. The Elementary School Journal, 91(3), 271-277. Epstein, J. (2001). School, family, and community partnerships. Boulder: Westview Press. Gibson, M.A. (2002). The new Latino diaspora and educational policy. In S. Wortham, E.G. Murillo, & E.T. Hamann (Eds.), Education in the new Latino diaspora: Policy and the politics of identity. Westport, CT: Ablex Publishing. Gold, E., Simon, E., & Brown, C. (2005). A New Conception of Parent Engagement: Community Organizing for School Reform. In F.W.English (Ed.), The Sage Handbook of Educational Leadership: Advances in Theory, Research, and Practice (pp. 237-268). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. Harvard Family Research Project – Family Involvement Resources and Publications: http://www.hfrp.org/family-involvement/publications-resources?topic=12http://www.hfrp.org/family-involvement/publications-resources?topic=12 Jeynes, William H. (2005). Parental Involvement and Student Achievement: A Meta-Analysis. Harvard Family Research Project, http://www.hfrp.org/family-involvement/publications- resources/parental-involvement-and-student-achievement-a-meta-analysis, retrieved January 10, 2008.http://www.hfrp.org/family-involvement/publications- resources/parental-involvement-and-student-achievement-a-meta-analysis Henderson, A.T., and Mapp, K.L. (2002). A new wave of evidence: The impact on school, family, and community connections on student achievement. Southwest Educational Development Laboratory: Austin, TX. Institute for Responsive Education. (2003). Parent Leadership Exchange: Three-year evaluation report. Boston. www.responsiveeducation.org/pdf/pleFinalReport.pdf

14 Appendix #2 14

15 Appendix #3 15 Do you know about..?

16 Appendix #4.1 How often do you get information from the FRA? Which school does your child attend * How often do you get information from Family Resource Aide? Crosstabulation 16

17 Appendix #4.2 How many times have you gone to parent meetings? * Do you know about your school`s score on CMT? Crosstabulation How many times have you gone to parent meetings? * Do you know about the Board`s Welcome Center? Crosstabulation 17 Count Do you know about your school`s score on CMT? NoYesBlankTotal How many times have you gone to parent meetings? 0 0101 Never 42677116 3.5 1849370 1-2 47935145 6 or more 923133 Blank 1618 Total 11723917373 Count Do you know about the Board`s Welcome Center? NoYesBlankTotal How many times have you gone to parent meetings? 0 0101 Never 76346116 3.5 3035570 1-2 91504145 6 or more 825033 Blank 3508 Total20815015373

18 Appendix #5 18

19 Appendix #6 19 "The Comer Process provides a structure as well as a process for mobilizing adults to support students' learning and overall development." - Systemic reform program as well as school reform program - Recognizes many barriers to parental involvement that are directly relevant to Hartford population Role of parents in Comer model: Level 1: Parents provide general support and participate in a variety of activities designed to stimulate their interest in the school. Level 2: Parents are involved as volunteers in daily school affairs. Level 3: Parents participate in school decision making by serving on the School Planning and Management Team(SPMT). School Planning and Management Team

20 Appendix #7 20

21 Appendix #8 21


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