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Slide 1 of 43 Chemistry10.1. © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 2 of 43 The Mole: A Measurement of Matter You could measure the amount of sand in.

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Presentation on theme: "Slide 1 of 43 Chemistry10.1. © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 2 of 43 The Mole: A Measurement of Matter You could measure the amount of sand in."— Presentation transcript:

1 Slide 1 of 43 Chemistry10.1

2 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 2 of 43 The Mole: A Measurement of Matter You could measure the amount of sand in a sand sculpture by counting each grain of sand, but it would be much easier to weigh the sand. You’ll discover how chemists measure the amount of a substance using a unit called a mole, which relates the number of particles to the mass. 10.1

3 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > Slide 3 of 43 Measuring Matter What are three methods for measuring the amount of something? 10.1

4 Slide 4 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > Measuring Matter You often measure the amount of something by one of three different methods—by count, by mass, and by volume. 10.1

5 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 5 of

6 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 6 of

7 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 7 of

8 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 8 of

9 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 9 of 43 Practice Problems for Sample Problem 10.1 Problem Solving 10.1 Solve Problem 1 with the help of an interactive guided tutorial.

10 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > Slide 10 of 43 What is a Mole? What Is a Mole? How is Avogadro’s number related to a mole of any substance? 10.1

11 Slide 11 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > What is a Mole? A mole of any substance contains Avogadro’s number of representative particles, or 6.02  representative particles. The term representative particle refers to the species present in a substance: usually atoms, molecules, or formula units. 10.1

12 Slide 12 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > What is a Mole? Converting Number of Particles to Moles One mole (mol) of a substance is 6.02  representative particles of that substance and is the SI unit for measuring the amount of a substance. The number of representative particles in a mole, 6.02  10 23, is called Avogadro’s number. 10.1

13 Slide 13 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > What is a Mole? 10.1

14 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 14 of

15 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 15 of

16 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 16 of

17 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 17 of

18 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 18 of 43 Practice Problems for Sample Problem 10.2 Problem Solving 10.4 Solve Problem 4 with the help of an interactive guided tutorial.

19 Slide 19 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > What is a Mole? Converting Moles to Number of Particles 10.1

20 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 20 of

21 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 21 of

22 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 22 of

23 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 23 of

24 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 24 of 43 Practice Problems for Sample Problem 10.3 Problem Solving 10.5 Solve Problem 5 with the help of an interactive guided tutorial.

25 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > Slide 25 of 43 The Mass of a Mole of an Element How is the atomic mass of an element related to the molar mass of an element? 10.1

26 Slide 26 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > The Mass of a Mole of an Element The atomic mass of an element expressed in grams is the mass of a mole of the element. The mass of a mole of an element is its molar mass. 10.1

27 Slide 27 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > The Mass of a Mole of an Element One molar mass of carbon, sulfur, mercury, and iron are shown. 10.1

28 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 28 of 43 The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > Animation 11 Find out how Avogadro’s number is based on the relationship between the amu and the gram.

29 Slide 29 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > The Mass of a Mole of an Element 10.1

30 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > Slide 30 of 43 The Mass of a Mole of a Compound How is the mass of a mole of a compound calculated? 10.1

31 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 31 of 43 The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > The Mass of a Mole of a Compound To calculate the molar mass of a compound, find the number of grams of each element in one mole of the compound. Then add the masses of the elements in the compound. 10.1

32 Slide 32 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > The Mass of a Mole of a Compound Substitute the unit grams for atomic mass units. Thus 1 mol of SO 3 has a mass of 80.1 g. 10.1

33 Slide 33 of 43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall The Mole: A Measurement of Matter > The Mass of a Mole of a Compound Molar Masses of Glucose, Water, and Paradichlorobenzene 10.1

34 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 34 of

35 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 35 of

36 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 36 of

37 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 37 of

38 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 38 of 43 Practice Problems for Sample Problem 10.4 Problem Solving 10.7 Solve Problem 7 with the help of an interactive guided tutorial.

39 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 39 of 43 Section Quiz -or- Continue to: Launch: Assess students’ understanding of the concepts in Section 10.1 Section Quiz

40 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 40 of Section Quiz. 1. Three common ways of measuring the amount of something are by count, by mass, and a.by temperature. b.by volume. c.by area. d.by density.

41 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 41 of Section Quiz. 2. A mole of hydrogen gas, H 2 (g), contains 6.02 x a.molecules. b.atoms. c.amu. d.grams.

42 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 42 of Section Quiz. 3. The atomic mass of fluorine is 19.0 amu, so the molar mass is a.19.0 amu. b.19.0 g. c.6.02 x amu. d.6.02 x g.

43 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 43 of Section Quiz. 4. Calculate the molar mass of ammonium nitrate. a g b g c g d g

44 END OF SHOW


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