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Author: Pam Munoz Ryan Genre: Biography Big Question: How can our determination affect our ability to succeed?

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Presentation on theme: "Author: Pam Munoz Ryan Genre: Biography Big Question: How can our determination affect our ability to succeed?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Author: Pam Munoz Ryan Genre: Biography Big Question: How can our determination affect our ability to succeed?

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3 Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

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5 international prehistoric untrustworthy constellation honorary disagreement preparation Philadelphia promotional constitution unbreakable biodegradable coordination compassionate impossibility entirety executive companionship unthinkable predicament inappropriately nonnegotiable nondiscriminatory instantaneously decaffeinated

6 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

7 application dramatic enraged formal momentous opera prejudice privileged recital segregated tuition harassed ignorance treated Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Question of the Day How can our determination affect our ability to succeed?

9 Build Concepts Generalize Ask Questions Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Model Emotion/Expression Grammar: Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs Spelling: Multisyllabic Words Discrimination

10 Model Emotion/Expression

11 Listen as I read “The Gold Cadillac.” As I read, notice how I change the tone and volume of my voice to express the emotions involved in different scenes. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 Make a generalization about white people’s attitudes toward African Americans in the South during the time of this story. Why did the father respond to the situation the way he did?

13 harassed – bothered; disturbed ignorance – lack of knowledge treated – acted toward (Next Slide)

14 (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

15 CausesActionsVictims Discrimination

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18 This week’s audio tells listeners about what it takes to become a professional singer. After we listen, we will discuss what you learned.

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20 application – a request for something such as employment, an award, or a loan dramatic – like a drama; of or about plays enraged – made very angry; made furious formal – according to set customs or rules

21 momentous – very important opera –a play in which music is an essential and prominent part, featuring arias, choruses, and with orchestral accompaniment prejudice – unreasonable dislike of an idea or group of people

22 privileged – having some special rights, advantage, or favor recital – a musical entertainment, given usually by a single performer

23 segregated – separated by race by having separate schools, restaurants, and other facilities tuition – money paid for instruction (Next Slide)

24 Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs

25 marian want to sing in his own countrys’ capital Marian wants to sing in her own country’s capital. the bound of friendship between millie and ms gooding was unbrakeable The bond of friendship between Millie and Ms. Gooding was unbreakable.

26 But there was still one place Marian had not sung. The verb sing is irregular. It does not use –ed to form its past and past participle forms. It has a different spelling for each form: sing, sang, (have) sung.

27 Usually you add –ed to a verb to form the past and past participle. Irregular verbs do not follow this rule. Instead of having –ed forms to show past tense, irregular verbs usually change to other words.

28 Present: Sharon sings in a group. Present Participle: She is singing on Saturday. Part Tense: They sang every weekend last month. Past Participle: The group has sung together for five years.

29 Present TensePresent ParticiplePast TensePast Participle become (is, are) becoming became(has, have, had) become choose (is, are) choosing chose(has, have, had) chosen fall (is, are) falling fell(has, have, had) fallen find (is, are) finding found(has, have, had) found get (is, are) getting got(has, have, had) gotten give (is, are) giving gave(has, have, had) given go (is, are) going went(has, have, had) gone hear (is, are) hearing heard(has, have, had) heard is/are (is, are) being was/were(has, have, had) been know (is, are) knowing knew(has, have, had) known leave (is, are) leaving left(has, have, had) left sing (is, are) singing sang(has, have, had) sung speak (is, are) speaking spoke(has, have, had) spoken

30 John sings while he works. present Marian knew she had a good voice. past Phyllis gave the performance of her life. past

31 Michelle is going to Europe for several performances. present participle Eleanor Roosevelt had heard about Marian’s struggles. past participle

32 Howard University (had chose, had chosen) Constitution Hall for Marian’s concert. had chosen Crowds (heared, heard) Marian’s velvety, strong voice. heard

33 President Roosevelt (spoke, have spoke) with the Department of the Interior about the concert’s location. spoke

34 Ethel May (becamed, had become) Marian’s biggest fan. had become When Marian (has singing, sang), folks were amazed at her remarkable talent. sang

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36 international prehistoric untrustworthy constellation honorary disagreement preparation Philadelphia promotional constitution unbreakable biodegradable coordination compassionate impossibility entirety executive companionship unthinkable predicament inappropriately nonnegotiable nondiscriminatory instantaneously decaffeinated

37 Question of the Day What do Marian’s responses to difficulties reveal about her?

38 Word Structure: Suffixes Generalize Draw Conclusions Vocabulary Fluency: Choral Reading Grammar: Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs Spelling: Multisyllabic Words Social Studies: Learn About Pioneers Discrimination

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41 Choral Reading

42 Turn to page 308. As I read the scene with the music- school receptionist aloud, listen for the changes in my voice that are expressions of the emotions Marian might feel in this situation, such as a low tone for helplessness. We will practice as a class doing three echo readings of these paragraphs.

43 Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs

44 the childrens’ melodys fell softly upon our ears The children’s melodies fell softly upon our ears. mr gooding choosed to perform the aria in its interety Mr. Gooding chose to perform the aria in its entirety.

45 The four principal parts of a verb are the present, present participle, past, and past participle. An irregular verb does not add –ed to form the past tense. Have, has, and had, show perfect tenses.

46 Present TensePresent ParticiplePast TensePast Participle become (is, are) becoming became(has, have, had) become choose (is, are) choosing chose(has, have, had) chosen fall (is, are) falling fell(has, have, had) fallen find (is, are) finding found(has, have, had) found get (is, are) getting got(has, have, had) gotten give (is, are) giving gave(has, have, had) given go (is, are) going went(has, have, had) gone hear (is, are) hearing heard(has, have, had) heard is/are (is, are) being was/were(has, have, had) been know (is, are) knowing knew(has, have, had) known leave (is, are) leaving left(has, have, had) left sing (is, are) singing sang(has, have, had) sung speak (is, are) speaking spoke(has, have, had) spoken

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48 international prehistoric untrustworthy constellation honorary disagreement preparation Philadelphia promotional constitution unbreakable biodegradable coordination compassionate impossibility entirety executive companionship unthinkable predicament inappropriately nonnegotiable nondiscriminatory instantaneously decaffeinated

49 Question of the Day In the end, was it a good thing that Marian was banned from singing at Constitution Hall?

50 Generalize Ask Questions Word Structure: Suffixes Vocabulary Fluency: Model Emotion/Expression Grammar: Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs Spelling: Multisyllabic Words Time for Social Studies: “Jim Crow” Laws African Americans in Opera Discrimination

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52 Model Emotion/Expression

53 Turn to page 314. As I read the story of Marian’s opera debut, notice how I alter my tone of voice to express Marian’s nervousness and excitement. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings.

54 Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs

55 he left america to sing on the intirnational stage He left America to sing on the international stage. the pianoes was moved to the side of the stage The pianos were moved to the side of the stage.

56 The four principal parts of a verb are the present, present participle, past, and past participle. An irregular verb does not add –ed to form the past tense. Have, has, and had, show perfect tenses.

57 Present TensePresent ParticiplePast TensePast Participle become (is, are) becoming became(has, have, had) become choose (is, are) choosing chose(has, have, had) chosen fall (is, are) falling fell(has, have, had) fallen find (is, are) finding found(has, have, had) found get (is, are) getting got(has, have, had) gotten give (is, are) giving gave(has, have, had) given go (is, are) going went(has, have, had) gone hear (is, are) hearing heard(has, have, had) heard is/are (is, are) being was/were(has, have, had) been know (is, are) knowing knew(has, have, had) known leave (is, are) leaving left(has, have, had) left sing (is, are) singing sang(has, have, had) sung speak (is, are) speaking spoke(has, have, had) spoken

58 Past forms of irregular verbs are not used with a helping verb, but past participle forms are. No: He has did it. They have went. Yes: He did it. They went. Yes: He has done it. They have done it.

59 Review something you have written to see if you can improve it by correcting errors in past and past participle forms.

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61 international prehistoric untrustworthy constellation honorary disagreement preparation Philadelphia promotional constitution unbreakable biodegradable coordination compassionate impossibility entirety executive companionship unthinkable predicament inappropriately nonnegotiable nondiscriminatory instantaneously decaffeinated

62 Question of the Day Why do we sometimes need inspiration or role models to keep from giving up on an important goal?

63 Expository Nonfiction/Text Features Reading Across Texts Content-Area Vocabulary Fluency: Partner Reading Grammar: Principal parts of Irregular Verbs Spelling: Multisyllabic Words Time for Social Studies: Analyzing Speeches

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65 Partner Reading

66 Turn to page 314. Read this page three times with a partner. Be sure to read with proper emotion and expression, and offer each other feedback.

67 Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs

68 there were no empty seats on the bus and ethel finded herself in a predicament There were no empty seats on the bus, and Ethel found herself in a predicament. the winners’ of the singing contest is about to receive their prizes The winners of the singing contest are about to receive their prizes.

69 The four principal parts of a verb are the present, present participle, past, and past participle. An irregular verb does not add –ed to form the past tense. Have, has, and had, show perfect tenses.

70 Present TensePresent ParticiplePast TensePast Participle become (is, are) becoming became(has, have, had) become choose (is, are) choosing chose(has, have, had) chosen fall (is, are) falling fell(has, have, had) fallen find (is, are) finding found(has, have, had) found get (is, are) getting got(has, have, had) gotten give (is, are) giving gave(has, have, had) given go (is, are) going went(has, have, had) gone hear (is, are) hearing heard(has, have, had) heard is/are (is, are) being was/were(has, have, had) been know (is, are) knowing knew(has, have, had) known leave (is, are) leaving left(has, have, had) left sing (is, are) singing sang(has, have, had) sung speak (is, are) speaking spoke(has, have, had) spoken

71 Test Tip: Some irregular verbs, such as cost, cut, hit, hurt, let, put, and shut, have the same spelling for the present, past, and past participle forms. Example: I put on my hat. (present) I put my on my hat yesterday. (past) I have put on my hat many times. (past participle)

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73 international prehistoric untrustworthy constellation honorary disagreement preparation Philadelphia promotional constitution unbreakable biodegradable coordination compassionate impossibility entirety executive companionship unthinkable predicament inappropriately nonnegotiable nondiscriminatory instantaneously decaffeinated

74 Question of the Day How can our determination affect our ability to succeed?

75 Build Concept Vocabulary Generalize Simile/Metaphor Word Structure: Suffixes Grammar: Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs Spelling: Multisyllabic Words Readers’ Guide to Periodical Literature Discrimination

76 Sometimes authors write broad statements that apply to many examples. These statements are called generalizations. Often, clue words such as most, all, sometimes, always, and never help to identify generalizations. Generalizations supported by facts and logic are called valid generalizations.

77 Faulty generalizations are not supported by facts. Generalizations should always be supported with facts from the text or your knowledge of the world. Generalization Support

78 Similes and metaphors are comparisons of two unlike things, concepts, or people. A simile states that A is like or as B. A metaphor is a more direct comparison than a simile. It states that A is B.

79 A suffix is a word part that is added to the end of a base word. A suffix changes the meaning of the base word. Use your knowledge of suffixes to help you determine the meaning of an unknown word. Complete the chart by writing the meaning of each suffix and providing a definition for each word.

80 WordSuffix and Meaning Definition youngest professional audition conductor

81 Where might you find magazine articles on Marian Anderson written during her lifetime? You could find the information in the Readers’ Guide to Periodical Literature. First, choose the year for which you want to find articles. The Readers’ Guide has one volume for each year, going back to before For current articles on the subject, you should pick up a current volume.

82 Look up your subject in the year you have chosen. In this case, you begin with a last name. Your subject is Anderson, Marian. The Readers’ Guide will list article titles published in that year under that subject. A series of words, abbreviations, and numbers follow the article title. These give the magazine’s title, the month/week/date of the issue, and the page numbers where the article can be found.

83 Turn to the front pages of the volume. A list of abbreviations will give you the magazine’s title and explain how to read the code for the issue date. Many libraries also have an online version of the Readers’ Guide to Periodical Literature available for student use.

84 Anderson, Marian Breaking barriers at the Met. F. Ferrante. il Opera News v20 p 12–15 May 1957

85 Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs

86 by the time she was thirty, marla have sung in philedelphia By the time she was thirty, Marla had sung in Philadelphia. jj gives his friend a ticket, to the concert J.J. gave his friend a ticket to the concert.

87 The four principal parts of a verb are the present, present participle, past, and past participle. An irregular verb does not add –ed to form the past tense. Have, has, and had, show perfect tenses.

88 Present TensePresent ParticiplePast TensePast Participle become (is, are) becoming became(has, have, had) become choose (is, are) choosing chose(has, have, had) chosen fall (is, are) falling fell(has, have, had) fallen find (is, are) finding found(has, have, had) found get (is, are) getting got(has, have, had) gotten give (is, are) giving gave(has, have, had) given go (is, are) going went(has, have, had) gone hear (is, are) hearing heard(has, have, had) heard is/are (is, are) being was/were(has, have, had) been know (is, are) knowing knew(has, have, had) known leave (is, are) leaving left(has, have, had) left sing (is, are) singing sang(has, have, had) sung speak (is, are) speaking spoke(has, have, had) spoken

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90 international prehistoric untrustworthy constellation honorary disagreement preparation Philadelphia promotional constitution unbreakable biodegradable coordination compassionate impossibility entirety executive companionship unthinkable predicament inappropriately nonnegotiable nondiscriminatory instantaneously decaffeinated

91 Story test  Classroom webpage,  Reading Test AR  Other Reading Quizzes  Quiz #


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