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The Salem Witch Trials or as they say in France: Le procès des sorcières de Salem Created by Winton Yee of 1D2.

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Presentation on theme: "The Salem Witch Trials or as they say in France: Le procès des sorcières de Salem Created by Winton Yee of 1D2."— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Salem Witch Trials or as they say in France: Le procès des sorcières de Salem Created by Winton Yee of 1D2

3 Before we get started, let me tell you a little back story.

4 The Puritans had just come from England to North America, and had faced many hardships along the way. Their faith had been put to the test, and they needed to be cautious to not fall into the Devil’s hands.

5 There was much arguing going on in the town of Salem, Massachusetts, and many suspected it was the work of the Devil.

6 In the January of 1692, something strange happened that no one could explain.

7 Two young girls, Betty and Abigail Williams, who were the daughter and niece of the village minister, began to act unusually, having seizures, screaming nonsense, and going into trance-like states.

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9 Doctors sent to examine the children could find nothing wrong with them physically, so they suggested another explanation…

10 A genie? Doctors sent to examine the children could find nothing wrong with them physically, so they suggested another explanation…

11 A genie? No… Doctors sent to examine the children could find nothing wrong with them physically, so they suggested another explanation…

12 witchcraft

13 People in Salem accepted this diagnosis, and said...

14 WELL, OBVIOUSLY, WE HAVE A WITCH IN SALEM

15 Another girl, Ann Putnam, began experiencing the same “symptoms” as the other girls.

16 Under pressure, the three “victims” accused three women of witchcraft

17 BY SOME SLAVE FROM THE CARIBBEAN I WAS BEWITCHED

18 Indeed, one of the three “witches” was a slave from the Caribbean, Tituba. The other two suspects were Sarah Good and Sarah Osborne (both were in poverty).

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20 Both Sarah’s denied practicing witchcraft, but Tituba confessed to doing the Devil’s work.

21 She told the villagers that she had visions of colorful animals and even the Devil himself.

22 Both Sarah’s denied practicing witchcraft, but Tituba confessed to doing the Devil’s work. She told the villagers that she had visions of colorful animals and even the Devil himself. And then, she spoke of a network of witches within Salem…

23 Both Sarah’s denied practicing witchcraft, but Tituba confessed to doing the Devil’s work. She told the villagers that she had visions of colorful animals and even the Devil himself. And then, she spoke of a network of witches within Salem… VAMPIRE WITCHES, THAT IS!

24 Okay, so maybe there weren’t any vampire witches AW Aw, man! !

25 But regular “witches” were enough to scare the heebie-jeebies out of the community

26 The three women accused of witchcraft were all put in jail, and over the next few months more people were suspected of sinister evil.

27 Even Martha Corey, a devout church member and outstanding citizen, was blamed.

28 If such a high member of society could be a witch, then anyone could be one.

29 Even Martha Corey, a devout church member and outstanding citizen, was blamed. If such a high member of society could be a witch, then anyone could be one. Paranoia spread even further.

30 Even Martha Corey, a devout church member and outstanding citizen, was blamed. If such a high member of society could be a witch, then anyone could be one. Paranoia spread even further. Which was the work of a genie, right?

31 Even Martha Corey, a devout church member and outstanding citizen, was blamed. If such a high member of society could be a witch, then anyone could be one. Paranoia spread even further. Which was the work of a genie, right? *Sigh* No. There are NO SUCH THINGS AS GENIES.

32 Even Martha Corey, a devout church member and outstanding citizen, was blamed. If such a high member of society could be a witch, then anyone could be one. Paranoia spread even further. Which was the work of a genie, right? *Sigh* No. There are NO SUCH THINGS AS GENIES. Tell that to the genie.

33 The governor, William Phillips, created a special court specifically for the cases of the witches.

34 Soon, the trials claimed their first life.

35 The governor, William Phillips, created a special court specifically for the cases of the witches. Soon, the trials claimed their first life. On June 10, 1692, Bridget Bishop was hanged on Gallows Hill for practicing witchcraft

36 A minister, Cotton Mather, denounced the use of dreams and visions as evidence (called spectral evidence) against “witches” in court. He proclaimed, “It would be better if ten suspected witches escape than one innocent person should be condemned.”

37 However, he was ignored, and nineteen more people were killed for witchcraft, one crushed by stones.

38 The hysteria finally ended when Governor Phillips, in response to his wife being questioned for witchcraft, did away with the court for witches, prevented further arrests for being a witch, and released all the “witches” by 1693.

39 However, twenty-five people were dead because of the trials, and 200 people had been suspected of witchcraft.

40 The hysteria finally ended when Governor Phillips, in response to his wife being questioned for witchcraft, did away with the court for witches, prevented further arrests for being a witch, and released all the “witches” by However, twenty-five people were dead because of the trials, and 200 people had been suspected of witchcraft. It was until 1957 before Massachusetts apologized for the trials.

41 epilogue

42 Scientists now think that the three children who were “affected” by witchcraft might have been afflicted by fungus egrot, which can be found in rye and other grains. The fungus can lead to muscle spasms, vomiting, and hallucinations.

43 Tituba might have been drawing on the voodoo traditions of the Caribbean when she admitted to witchcraft.

44 Scientists now think that the three children who were “affected” by witchcraft might have been afflicted by fungus egrot, which can be found in rye and other grains. The fungus can lead to muscle spasms, vomiting, and hallucinations. Tituba might have been drawing on the voodoo traditions of the Caribbean when she admitted to witchcraft. In 1711, the colony of Massachusetts restored the name of the accused “witches” (which didn’t really help, because they were…dead) and gave their kin 600 pounds as compensation

45 And there’s also a lesson to be learned from all this…

46 Follow your dreams

47 But, seriously, mass hysteria isn’t cool, and the lesson is to think rationally and not freak out when things go wrong.

48 fin

49 ion/index.shtml erstories.net archaeology/brief-salem.html there-must-be-blog-prompt-list.html per.jpg corey/?iact=hc&vpx=145&vpy=348&dur=117&hovh=194&hovw=259&tx=178&ty=197&ei =6K8bTafGNYGclgeQt83LCw&oei=6K8bTafGNYGclgeQt83LCw&esq=1&page=1&tbnh= 151&tbnw=217&start=0&ndsp=12&ved=1t:429,r:8,s:0 60&dur=1850&hovh=194&hovw=259&tx=164&ty=124&ei=PLUbTYuDK4a8lQfEzpjeAg& oei=PLUbTYuDK4a8lQfEzpjeAg&esq=1&page=1&tbnh=117&tbnw=154&start=0&ndsp= 18&ved=1t:429,r:6,s:0 Well, almost Fin. Sources Read Magazine: Witch Hunt, Article: Which Witch is Which? The Salem Witch Trials: by Stuart A. Kallen The Salem Witch Trials: by Michael Burgan


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