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© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

2 2 A number of the slides in this presentation are animated. When viewing this presentation please run it in slideshow mode.

3 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 3 Satellite modems can transmit a limited number of packets per second Typically 1800 – 2000 pps VoIP generates a large number of small packets Common rate is 100 pps for each call Causes inefficient use of available bandwidth Modem runs out of packet-per-second “slots” before all available bandwidth is utilized Remote Site Main Site Bandwidth usage Packets per second 0%0% 0% 100% IP Phones VoIP Call Satellite Modem

4 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 4 Cisco IP multiplexing combines many smaller packets into one larger packet automatically engages when multiple packets are heading for the same destination Larger packets allow for increased packets-per-second efficiency Connecting additional VoIP calls does not increase packets-per-second Remaining packets-per-second makes bandwidth available for other applications Remote Site Main Site Bandwidth usage Packets per second 0%0% 0% 100% VoIP Call IP Multiplex Tunnel IP Phones Satellite Modem IP MUX

5 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 5 New interface output feature, like ACLs or QoS Combine multiple packets into single, larger, packet Packets are multiplexed by wrapping a new IP/UDP header around combined packets: Transparent to application, works at layer 3 Can multiplex any IP packet Works in hub and spoke topology, IP multiplexing-enabled router is required at each end Intermediate hops are supported Multiplexed packets look just like regular IP packets to non ip multiplexing-enabled devices Supports IPv4 and IPv6 New IP/UDP header Data Packet 1 Data Packet 2

6 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 6 Mux No Mux Operates as an interface output feature Egress Interface IP Mux Feature IP /UDP Packet

7 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 7 Supported on: Cisco 892, 819, 29xx, and 39xx Cisco 5915ESR, 5940ESR Licensing Licensed using standard RTU (right-to-use) feature license no license file to install, honor-based, paper license Must be licensed on each node performing IP multiplexing Status Available in 15.2(2)GC IOS Q1CY12 (29xx, 39xx, 59xx) Available in 15.2(4)M IOS Q3CY12 (819, 892, 29xx, 39xx)

8 Cisco Confidential 8 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

9 9 18 VoIP calls, G.729 codec (20ms sample), consumes 1800pps VoIP is consuming 100% of the modem packets/sec capacity 4 mbps of remaining bandwidth is wasted, modem cannot transmit excess packets/sec Other applications cannot use extra bandwidth, no more calls possible Maximum calls possible, without degradation – 18 hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 903 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 903 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec Hub Spoke LAN WAN LAN Satellite connection 5mbps BW, 1800packets/sec Satellite connection 5mbps BW, 1800packets/sec Hub Router, WAN-side interface 1800 packets/sec consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 1800 packets/sec consumed

10 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved VoIP calls, G.729 codec (20ms sample), consumes just 100pps, 90% reduction Modem has 1700 packets/sec left over Remaining bandwidth, ~4mbps, is available to other applications, or additional voip calls Hub Spoke LAN WAN LAN hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec Satellite connection 5mbps BW, 1800packets/sec Satellite connection 5mbps BW, 1800packets/sec hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 903 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 903 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec Without mux: With mux: Hub Router, WAN-side interface 1800 packets/sec consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 1800 packets/sec consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 100 packets/sec consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 100 packets/sec consumed

11 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved VoIP calls, G.729 codec (20ms sample), uses 1.8 mbps 1 mbps for VoIP traffic 800 kbps for IPsec overhead IPsec increases bandwidth consumption of VoIP by ~80% IPsec overhead consumes 17% overall link bandwidth Remaining bandwidth – 3 mbps hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 904 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec hub#show int g0/1 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 904 packets/sec hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 904 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec hub#show int g0/1 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 904 packets/sec Hub Spoke LAN WAN LAN IPsec Tunnel Hub Router, WAN-side interface 1.8 mbps consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 1.8 mbps consumed Hub Router, LAN-side interface 1 mbps consumed Hub Router, LAN-side interface 1 mbps consumed WAN connection 5 mbps bandwidth WAN connection 5 mbps bandwidth

12 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved VoIP calls, G.729 codec (20ms sample), uses 1.8mbps Mux reduced IPsec overhead by 94% Remaining bandwidth – 4 mbps, a 33% increase hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 51 packets/sec hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 51 packets/sec Hub Spoke LAN WAN LAN IPsec Tunnel WAN connection 5 mbps bandwidth WAN connection 5 mbps bandwidth hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 904 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 904 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 901 packets/sec Without mux: With mux: Hub Router, WAN-side interface 1.8 mbps consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 1.8 mbps consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 940 kbps consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 940 kbps consumed

13 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 13 Single box solution No need to for additional piece of equipment IOS feature Single CLI, no need for additional configuration, management, or training Easily add IP mux to existing network via IOS software upgrade No manipulation of voice stream, codec quality is maintained No need to duplicate dial plans or deal with complex call routing IP mux does not interact with VoIP Ability to multiplex any IP packet, not just VoIP Other good targets include video and other small UDP streams

14 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 14 IP multiplexing does not compress any packets (VoIP or otherwise) Method 1 - Tune the VoIP packetization rate Increase number of voice samples per packet Larger packets, but less overhead Supported by CUCM, CME, IP phones, gateways, CUBE Example, increase sample size from 20ms to 40ms: Method 2 - Leverage IP mux on data traffic to reduce IPsec overhead Saves 56 bytes per packet cRTP only saves 36 bytes per packet and applies only to Vo IP hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec hub#show int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 50 packets/sec hub#sho int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 25 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 25 packets/sec hub#sho int g0/2 | inc rate 30 second input rate bits/sec, 25 packets/sec 30 second output rate bits/sec, 25 packets/sec 10 calls, 20ms rate, with IP mux: 10 calls, 40ms rate, with IP mux: Hub Router, WAN-side interface 500 kbps consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 500 kbps consumed Hub Router, WAN-side interface 330 kbps consumed 34% bandwidth reduction Hub Router, WAN-side interface 330 kbps consumed 34% bandwidth reduction

15 Cisco Confidential 15 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

16 16 Create ACL to identify interesting traffic Create ip mux profile Attach ACL to profile Define source interface / address Define destination address Enable ip mux on egress interface Activate ip mux profile IP mux policies (optional) Additional commands (optional)

17 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 17 Access lists are used to identify interesting traffic Numbered and named lists are supported Access list criteria is restricted, use only: Destination IP address Destination port (or port range) Protocol DSCP Do not create overlapping / ambiguous ACLs Any time changes are made to an ACL already attached to a profile that profile MUST be reset with “shutdown / no shutdown” Console messages will remind you which profile to reset: % You must shut/no shut profile profile-1 to use this ACL for IP Multiplexing.

18 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 18 Creates a point-to-point IP mux connection Profiles start in “shutdown” state multiplex operation will not happen when profile is shutdown demultiplex operation will happen with profile shutdown Configure BOTH routers before issuing “no shut” on the respective profiles Profiles have global scope all profiles apply to all interfaces with “ip mux” configured Source / destination addresses must match at each end Incoming superframes will be ignored otherwise Mandatory items source address destination address access-list ip mux profile rtp destination source interface g0/0 access-list mux-rtp no shutdown ! ip mux profile sjc destination source interface g0/1 access-list mux-sjc no shutdown ! ip mux profile rtp destination source interface g0/0 access-list mux-rtp no shutdown ! ip mux profile sjc destination source interface g0/1 access-list mux-sjc no shutdown !

19 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 19 Mux is enabled on a per interface basis All profiles are evaluated by any interface with mux enabled Supported interface types Ethernet GRE (IPv4 / IPv6) VLAN VMI over Ethernet Virtual Template on VMI interface GigabitEthernet0/0 ip mux ! interface GigabitEthernet0/0 ip mux !

20 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 20 Hub Fa0/1 Gig0/2.14Fa0/ Spoke LAN Gig0/1 WAN LAN x/ x/ / /24 ip access-list extended profile-1-acl permit udp any ! ip mux profile profile-1 destination source interface GigabitEthernet0/2.14 access-list profile-1-acl ! interface GigabitEthernet0/2.14 description to 5915 ip address ip mux ! ip mux profile profile-1 no shutdown ! ip access-list extended profile-1-acl permit udp any ! ip mux profile profile-1 destination source interface GigabitEthernet0/2.14 access-list profile-1-acl ! interface GigabitEthernet0/2.14 description to 5915 ip address ip mux ! ip mux profile profile-1 no shutdown ! ip access-list extended profile-2-acl permit udp any ! ip mux profile profile-2 destination source interface FastEthernet0/0 access-list profile-2-acl ! interface FastEthernet0/0 description to 3945 ip address ip mux ! ip mux profile profile-2 no shutdown ! ip access-list extended profile-2-acl permit udp any ! ip mux profile profile-2 destination source interface FastEthernet0/0 access-list profile-2-acl ! interface FastEthernet0/0 description to 3945 ip address ip mux ! ip mux profile profile-2 no shutdown ! Hub ConfigurationSpoke Configuration

21 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 21 spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#maxlength ? IP total length value spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#maxlength ? IP total length value maxlength (default: 1472 bytes) How large of a packet should we multiplex with other packets? The larger the packets, the lower the mux ratio Cannot be set above the mtu spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#mtu ? Maximum super-frame length spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#mtu ? Maximum super-frame length mtu (default: 1500 bytes) How large of a multiplexed packet should we make? Value includes IP mux overhead ( 28 bytes ) “mtu 1500” will mux a maximum of 1472 bytes Interface MTU is NOT automatically calculated Do not set mux MTU higher than interface MTU

22 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 22 spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#holdtime ? Number of milliseconds spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#holdtime ? Number of milliseconds holdtime (default: 20 ms) How long should we hold packets in the hold-queue? The longer the holdtime the more (potential) delay IP mux will add spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#ttl ? TTL Value spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#ttl ? TTL Value ttl (default: 64) Sets TTL value in IP header of superframe Most customers should never need to adjust this

23 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 23 spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#[no] shutdown spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#[no] shutdown shutdown (default: shutdown) Profiles default to “shutdown” state Profile must be “shutdown” when making changes to the attached ACL spoke(config)#ip mux udpport ? UDP port number spoke(config)#ip mux udpport ? UDP port number ip mux udpport (default: 6682) Specifies the source / destination port for IP mux operation must be the same on all routers

24 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 24 Mux Hold-Queue Similar to the “qos pre-classify” problem of IPsec Traffic classifiers see only the IP header of the superframe By default the DSCP is 0 QoS classification via DSCP is no longer accurate ACL matching Packets Outgoing Superframe DSCP 0 DSCP EF DSCP CS7 DSCP EF DSCP 0 IP/UDP DSCP 0 Superframe header masks the DSCP values of the packets contained therein

25 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 25 policy QUEUE 1 Match CS7, EF Set EF policy QUEUE 2 Match AF31 Set AF31 Default Queue Match All Set 0 DSCP CS7 DSCP EF ACL matching Packets DSCP AF31 DSCP 0 DSCP CS5 Outgoing Superframes DSCP AF31 IP/UDP DSCP AF31 DSCP CS7DSCP EF IP/UDP DSCP EF DSCP CS5DSCP 0 IP/UDP DSCP 0 IP multiplex policies Match DSCP values, assign DSCP value to IP multiplex header

26 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 26 Each profile has at least one policy (default) Sets DSCP 0 on outbound superframes Default policy is used if no match is found in other policies (or no other policies exist) Each ip mux policy adds a new hold queue to ALL configured profiles ip mux profile rtp ip mux policy one matchdscp cs7 matchdscp ef outdscp ef ! ip mux policy one matchdscp cs7 matchdscp ef outdscp ef ! ip mux policy two matchdscp cs7 matchdscp ef outdscp ef ! ip mux policy two matchdscp cs7 matchdscp ef outdscp ef ! ip mux profile sjc policy QUEUE one Match CS7, EF Set EF policy QUEUE two Match AF31 Set AF31 Default Policy Queue Match All Set 0 policy QUEUE one Match CS7, EF Set EF policy QUEUE two Match AF31 Set AF31 Default Policy Queue Match All Set 0

27 © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 27 By default, IP multiplexing generates superframes containing a single packet Packets will always be muxed, even if only one is in the queue Can be used to simplify firewall rule sets: spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#[no] singlepacket spoke(config)#ip mux profile profile-1 spoke(config-ipmux-profile)#[no] singlepacket Hub Fa0/ Spoke LAN Gig0/1 WAN LAN x/ x/ /24 IP Multiplex Tunnel Firewall only needs to permit udp traffic from :6682 to :6682 IP phone media traffic will be obscured by the IP multiplex tunnel End-to-end firewall configuration is not required /24

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