Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Dual Enrollment and Early/Middle Colleges and Programs in Michigan 2014 Fall OCTE Update October 30, 2014 Sam Sinicropi Beverly Brown.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Dual Enrollment and Early/Middle Colleges and Programs in Michigan 2014 Fall OCTE Update October 30, 2014 Sam Sinicropi Beverly Brown."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dual Enrollment and Early/Middle Colleges and Programs in Michigan 2014 Fall OCTE Update October 30, 2014 Sam Sinicropi Beverly Brown

2 What We Will Cover 2 PA 160, 1996 Postsecondary Options Act (Dual Enrollment Law) Enhanced Dual Enrollment Early/Middle Colleges in Michigan College Credit Opportunities Chart

3 3 PA 160 Postsecondary Options Act Sam Sinicropi Postsecondary Enrollment Options Act –PA 160 of 1996 Career and Technical Preparation Act –PA 258 of 2000 Changes in 2012

4 4 Enhanced Dual Enrollment System Early Assessment with Guidance Sequenced, selected dual enrollment courses Support for college success Early Warning System that alerts the high schools, as well as the student Shared data collection and use Strong K-12/College Partnerships 4-year only schools

5 5 Notification of Options to Students School districts are required to inform all students of dual enrollment options By March 1 of each year, a school district or state approved nonpublic school shall provide general information about the postsecondary enrollment options under this act to all pupils in grade 8 or higher.

6 6 Readiness Academic Readiness: Qualifying assessment scores College Readiness: Social maturity and personal responsibility College transcript will begin!!

7 7 Qualifying Scores Assessments include MME, ACT, SAT, PLAN, etc. –See table on page 5 of FAQ document for all assessments and qualifying scores Student must have achieved qualifying score in subject area to take a course in that subject area* Courses in computer science and foreign language not offered by the school district do not have any qualifying score requirements Courses in fine arts do not have any qualifying score requirements, but must be permitted by school district

8 8 Essential vs. Non-Essential Is the course or an equivalent course offered at the student’s nonpublic high school and considered essential for graduation? Test with Curricular Crosswalk No -> Course can be taken for both high school and postsecondary credit Yes -> Course can only be taken for postsecondary credit

9 Course Limits Not more than 10 courses overall 4 Years3 Years2 Years/1 Year Grade 9:2 classesNot more than Grade 10:2 classes2 classessix during either Grade 11:2 classes4 classesacademic year Grade 12:4 classes4 classesof enrollment *Year five rules promulgated by the State Superintendent

10 10 Eligible Student Enrolled in at least 1 high school class in a public school district or state approved nonpublic school in this state Must have at least 1 parent or legal guardian who is a resident of this state Must not have been enrolled in high school for more than 4 school years* Must have letter signed by the student’s principal indicating dual enrollment eligibility

11 11 Homeschooled Students Homeschooled students are not included in the recent changes to this act and are not eligible to have eligible charges paid unless: –The student is taking at least one class through a public school and dual enrolls through that district or –The student is taking at least one class through a state- approved nonpublic school and dual enrolls through that school

12 12 Eligible Course Offered for postsecondary credit Not offered at student’s high school or unavoidable scheduling conflict Considered an academic course –not a hobby, craft, or recreational course Subject area other than physical education, theology divinity, or religious education Student must have achieved qualifying score in each subject area

13 13 Eligible Charges Tuition Mandatory course fees and registration fees Material fees, including books –Books become property of the school after completion of course (public school students only) Transportation fees, parking fees, and activity fees are NOT eligible charges

14 14 What if the Student Fails? If an eligible student fails to successfully* complete a course : –Public school students must repay the school district any eligible charges expended by the school district and not refunded by the postsecondary institution. –Nonpublic school students must repay the Department of Treasury any eligible charges expended by the state and not refunded by the postsecondary institution.

15 15 Reimbursement of Tuition Public school students: dual enroll and process payment through public school Nonpublic school students: dual enroll through nonpublic school and college will bill and receive payment directly through MDE

16 16 Reimbursement of Tuition (cont.) Shared time students (students enrolled at both a public and a nonpublic school): dual enroll and process payment through the public school  This process may change next school year

17 17 Non-public Dual Enrollment Funding Calculated using a prorated percentage of statewide average foundation allowance –$7,209 for FY –$7,262 for FY Use “Calculation” tab on billing form to calculate amount to be covered

18 18 Non-Public Dual Enrollment Billing Form

19 19 Billing & Payment Process (Non-public) Student dual enrolls and college bills MDE MDE verifies eligibility of student and accuracy of information MDE forwards information to Treasury College is paid by Treasury

20 20 Student Enrolls and College Bills MDE Before enrolling, the student and/or the college should verify that the non-public school is state approved –www.michigan.gov/mde > MDE Offices > School Support Services > Nonpublic & Home Schoolswww.michigan.gov/mde –If not state approved, contact Tami Feldpausch (MDE) at (517) for details on how to become state approved Non-Public Dual Enrollment Billing Form –All fields must be completed by college –If no UIC is available, the college should contact CEPI at (517) to assign one

21 21 Billing Information Sent to Treasury MDE forwards required information to Treasury for payment –Reimbursement requests are sent to Treasury once per month Treasury pays college –Turnaround time ~1 week –Method of payment same as other payments from the state (usually electronic ACH)

22 22 Dual Enrollment Data across the past twelve years ( ) indicate there is a: –222% increase in local school district funding used to pay dual enrollment fees –421% increase in the number of dual enrollment courses paid for by local school districts –133% increase in the number of students participating in dual enrollment –127% increase in the number of 11 th and 12 th grade eligible students –282 % increase in the number of postsecondary credits granted –138% increase in the number of high school credits granted

23 Beverly Brown Program Consultant for Early/Middle Colleges Types of E/MCs in Michigan

24 College in High School MEMCA College Coursework Data, Students (12 schools) Grade Number of College Course-Taking Students Cumulative College Coursework Average GPA Average Credits Earned Percent of Courses Passed (C grade or higher*) 9 th graders % 10 th graders % 11 th graders % 12 th graders % 13 th graders % Total2, % *Percentage of Courses Passed (C grade or higher): Includes A. B. C. P (Passing), D and F grades in the calculation

25 College Readiness 25 MEMCA Graduating Student Survey, Students

26 Early College HS Initiative Core Principles 26 Serve students underrepresented in higher education Created by a local education agency, an institution of higher education (IHE), and the community Develop an integrated academic program so that all students earn 1–2 years of college credit Engage all students in a comprehensive support system Partners work with intermediaries to advance the early college movement

27 27 Design Principles, Beliefs, and Best Practices Power of the Site Teaching and Learning Student Assessment Student Support Democratic School Governance Professional Development

28 MCNC Four Pillars of Student Success: I3 Project 28 Early College Design Principles –College-Focused Systemic Program –Comprehensive Student Support –Dynamic School/College Partnership –Culture of Continuous Improvement

29 29 E/MC Numbers in Michigan 10 E/MC SEEs 5 E/MC SWS 3 PSAs 1 School of Choice 35 E/MC School Programs 17 E/MC ISD-Based Programs

30 30 New Early/Middle College High School or Program for 2014

31 Four Types of E/MCs in Michigan 31 A stand-alone public high school (can be a Shared Educational Entity) A school within a school (SWS) Public School Academy E/MC 5-year Program (no new entity code necessary)

32 32 MEMCA Provides Technical Assistance in These Areas Organizational Structure Philosophical Base Higher Education Partnerships Legal Issues Funding Personnel Facilities, Furnishings and Supplies Safety/Security Marketing/PR/ Communication Data Educational Plans Standardized Testing Stakeholders Technology

33 Recommended Articles 33 AIR: “Early College Means Early Success for Students” JFF: “Early College Expansion” by Dr. Michael Webb

34 34 Contact Information Beverly Brown Sam Sinicropi

35 35 Questions?


Download ppt "Dual Enrollment and Early/Middle Colleges and Programs in Michigan 2014 Fall OCTE Update October 30, 2014 Sam Sinicropi Beverly Brown."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google