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Agenda. Review How did the impact of European imperialism on China differ from its impact on Russia and the Ottoman Empire?

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Presentation on theme: "Agenda. Review How did the impact of European imperialism on China differ from its impact on Russia and the Ottoman Empire?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Agenda

2 Review How did the impact of European imperialism on China differ from its impact on Russia and the Ottoman Empire?

3 Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration (1750 – 1900)

4 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: AFRICA, INDIA, AND THE NEW BRITISH EMPIRE ( )

5 Objectives Describe how different African leaders and peoples interacted with each other and how European nations’ relationship to African peoples changed during this period.

6 Essential Questions How did different African leaders and peoples interact with each other and how did European nations’ relationship to Africa? peoples change during this period.

7 Map 26-1, p. 689

8 Target: Changes and Exchanges in Africa Before 1870 – changed politically and expanded foreign trade. New African States – Clusters in sub-Sahara

9 – Shaka Zulu (r ) Zulu kingdom expanded by aggression. Lesotho and Swaziland states created to resist.

10 p. 686

11 – Islamic reform movement created another cluster in West African savannas. Hausa states. – Sokoto Caliphate ( )

12 Modernization in Egypt and Ethiopia – Egypt Ismail (r ) – European advisers, revenues, and exports. – Railroad and canal system. – Debts led to partial occupation by France and Britain.

13 – Ethiopia 1840s –purchased modern weapons, created strong armies. Emperor Tewodros II (r ) – local weapons manufacturing. Yohannes IV (r ) – most highland regions under imperial rule.

14 Europeans in Africa – France’s conquest of Algeria. French failure to repay grain debt for Napoleon’s 1798 invasion of Egypt led to disputes. French attacked Algeria in 1830 and won.

15 – Adventurous explorers traveled to Inner Africa. Assess mineral wealth, convert Africans to Christianity. Traced course of rivers.

16 Abolition and Legitimate Trade – Increased trade between West Africa and Europe. – Great Britain and the US made importing slaves from Africa illegal. Transatlantic slave trade ended in 1867.

17 – Cloth, metals, etc. in exchange for slaves. Expanded “legitimate” trade. – Altered social structure of coastal trading communities.

18 – Spread of Western cultural influences in West Africa. Sierra Leone – Christian missionaries – free black Americans founded Republic of Liberia. Free blacks from Brazil and Cuba brought Roman Catholicism, architecture, clothing.

19 Secondary Empires in Eastern Africa – Slavers moved to eastern Africa. – Ivory caravans under direction of African and Arab merchants. – Europeans supplied weapons, major consumers of ivory and cloves. “Secondary empires.”

20 Essential Questions How did different African leaders and peoples interact with each other and how did European nations’ relationship to Africa? peoples change during this period.

21 Agenda

22 Review How did different African leaders and peoples interact with each other and how did European nations’ relationship to Africa? peoples change during this period.

23 Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration (1750 – 1900)

24 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: AFRICA, INDIA, AND THE NEW BRITISH EMPIRE ( )

25 Objectives Describe how Britain secured its hold on India, and the colonial policies that led to the beginnings of Indian nationalism.

26 Essential Questions How did Britain secure its hold on India, and what colonial policies led to the beginnings of Indian nationalism?

27 Map 26-2, p. 693

28 Target: India Under British Rule – nearly all of India under British rule. Company Men – Mid 1700s – Maratha Confederation. – Nawabs.

29 – British, Dutch, and French companies eager to expand trade into India in the 18 th century. “Company men” established trading posts. – Trained sepoys (Indian troops) to protect warehouses.

30 1691 – British East India Company (EIC) established fortified outpost at Calcutta. – “Black Hole of Calcutta” (1756)

31 Raj and Rebellion ( ) – India on a British model. – EIC’s main goal – powerful gov’t backed by military. Christian missionaries.

32 – Private property. – Bolstered “traditions.” – Economic reform created new jobs, but drove many Indians out of handicraft textile industry.

33 Sepoy Rebellion (1857) – 1856 law required new recruits to serve overseas. High caste Hindus objected

34 – 1857 – Cartridges of Enfield rifles greased with animal fat. Rebellion in May – Muslim sepoys, peasants, discontented elites. – Not yet a nationalist revolution. Little sense of a common national identity.

35 Political Reform and Industrial Impact – – New centralized gov’t, rapid economic growth, new national consciousness. – 1858 – end of Mughal and Company rule – equal protection of law and freedom of religion and social customs.

36 – Powerful and efficient bureaucracy controlled India. Members of the elite Indian Civil Service (ICS) held senior administrative and judicial posts.

37 p. 698

38 – Harbors, cities, irrigation canals, tea plantations. – Exported cotton fiber, tea, silk, sugar. Imported manufactured goods from Britain. Women struggled.

39 – New technologies Steamboats, canals. Beginning in the 1840s – railroad boom.

40 Fig. 26-CO, p. 684

41 Indian nationalism – Many intellectuals turned to Western secular values and nationalism. – Educated middle class angered by the obstacles to advancement.

42 Indian National Congress in – Wanted larger role for Indians in the Civil Service and reductions in military spending. – Most were upper-caste, Western-educated. Needed mass support.

43 Essential Questions How did Britain secure its hold on India, and what colonial policies led to the beginnings of Indian nationalism?

44 Agenda

45 Review How did Britain secure its hold on India, and what colonial policies led to the beginnings of Indian nationalism?

46 Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration (1750 – 1900)

47 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: LAND EMPIRES IN THE AGE OF IMPERIALISM ( )

48 Objectives Evaluate the role the abolition of slavery and the continued growth of British overseas trade played in the immigration to the Caribbean and elsewhere of peoples from Africa, India, and Asia.

49 Essential Questions What role did the abolition of slavery and the continued growth of British overseas trade play in the immigration to the Caribbean and elsewhere of peoples from Africa, India, and Asia?

50 Map 26-3, p. 702

51 Target: Britain’s Eastern Empire Colonies and Commerce – Britain took over Dutch possessions overseas in – – Cape Colony, Malacca, and Ceylon. – Dutch Guiana and Trinidad.

52 – Cape Colony – supply station for voyages between Britain and India. Descendants of Dutch and French settlers on farms and ranches in the hinterland. – “Afrikaners” » Alienated by British decision to prohibit their expansion. » Great Trek ( )

53 – Singapore – center of trade and shipping between the Indian Ocean and China. – Burma

54 Imperial Policies and Shipping – Goal of most British imperial expansion – trade. – Most of the new colonies – ports or centers of production and distribution.

55 – Lands provided raw materials in return for manufactured goods. – Clipper ships.

56 Colonization of Australia and New Zealand – British settlers displaced the indigenous populations. – Australia Portuguese mariners had sighted (early 1600s). James Cook explored ( ). Expanding shipping networks brought visitors and settlers.

57 Hunting-and-gathering people. Isolation – vulnerable to diseases. First permanent British settlers – convicts (1788). – Slight contact with the indigenous (“Aborigines”) – 1851 discovery of gold brought hastened their end.

58 – New Zealand Maori hunted, fished, practiced simple forms of agriculture. Seal pelts, whaling. Brief gold rush attracted more British immigrants after 1860.

59 – Britain encouraged the settlers in Australia and New Zealand to become self-governing.

60 New Labor Migrations – – thousands of Indians, Chinese, and Africans went overseas to work, especially on sugar plantations. Asians and Pacific islanders after In part, linked to abolition. Recruitment of laborers. Larger, faster ships. Spread of disease.

61 – Indentured labor trade reflected unequal commercial and industrial power of the West But those who signed contracts were trying to improve their lives by emigrating.

62 Essential Questions What role did the abolition of slavery and the continued growth of British overseas trade play in the immigration to the Caribbean and elsewhere of peoples from Africa, India, and Asia?


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