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ROMAN CIVIL PROCEDURE UNIT 11. Preview Summons Summons Formulary procedure Formulary procedure Stages in the civil procedure Stages in the civil procedure.

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Presentation on theme: "ROMAN CIVIL PROCEDURE UNIT 11. Preview Summons Summons Formulary procedure Formulary procedure Stages in the civil procedure Stages in the civil procedure."— Presentation transcript:

1 ROMAN CIVIL PROCEDURE UNIT 11

2 Preview Summons Summons Formulary procedure Formulary procedure Stages in the civil procedure Stages in the civil procedure Praetor Praetor Edict Edict Formula Formula Procedural contract Procedural contract Trial Trial

3 SUMMONS In the classical law a summons for a lawsuit was performed privately: a person would find his opponent or his opponent’s representative and bring him before the magistrate In the classical law a summons for a lawsuit was performed privately: a person would find his opponent or his opponent’s representative and bring him before the magistrate

4 THE FORMULARY PROCEDURE Forms of action were described precisely, which gave the law continuity Forms of action were described precisely, which gave the law continuity In an individual case, the forms could be altered and assembled in different ways to create a specific statement of issues In an individual case, the forms could be altered and assembled in different ways to create a specific statement of issues This altering and assembling of forms was performed by a judicial magistrate This altering and assembling of forms was performed by a judicial magistrate

5 STAGES IN THE CIVIL PROCEDURE 1. In jure, before a magistrate, the praetor, charged with administering justice. The magistrate determined whether the litigants should be allowed to proceed and, what form their action should take 1. In jure, before a magistrate, the praetor, charged with administering justice. The magistrate determined whether the litigants should be allowed to proceed and, what form their action should take 2. In judicio, before a judge, a private individual who need not have been a lawyer - trial 2. In judicio, before a judge, a private individual who need not have been a lawyer - trial

6 PRAETOR An elected magistrate An elected magistrate Commander of an army Commander of an army Provincial governor Provincial governor

7

8 THE EDICT The magistrate needed a scheme for determining which claims would be allowed to proceed The magistrate needed a scheme for determining which claims would be allowed to proceed A long list containing the lawsuits to be allowed A long list containing the lawsuits to be allowed The edict - individual entries describing actions that could be granted The edict - individual entries describing actions that could be granted

9 The Edict If the litigant’s circumstances did not match any of the entries, he might persuade the magistrate to invent a new claim and allow it to go before a judge If the litigant’s circumstances did not match any of the entries, he might persuade the magistrate to invent a new claim and allow it to go before a judge If the magistrate accepted, he might incorporate the new claim in the edict for future cases If the magistrate accepted, he might incorporate the new claim in the edict for future cases

10 JUDGE The judge did not hold office but was appointed for service in a single case, and selected personally by the parties The judge did not hold office but was appointed for service in a single case, and selected personally by the parties He had no special qualifications other than his wealth He had no special qualifications other than his wealth A private individual who conducted the trial without guidance from the state A private individual who conducted the trial without guidance from the state

11 CONSEQUENCES A lay judge needed detailed written instructions at the outset A lay judge needed detailed written instructions at the outset His conduct of the trial and his judgement was of no enduring importance to the legal system His conduct of the trial and his judgement was of no enduring importance to the legal system

12 INSTRUCTIONS The final expression of the law in a given case was the set of instructions that the magistrate gave to the judge The final expression of the law in a given case was the set of instructions that the magistrate gave to the judge The parties’ pleadings, containing their allegations The parties’ pleadings, containing their allegations

13 INSTRUCTIONS The allegations had to satisfy the requirements of the law as determined by the magistrate, they came into the judge’s hands in a form that permitted relief under the law The allegations had to satisfy the requirements of the law as determined by the magistrate, they came into the judge’s hands in a form that permitted relief under the law

14 Instructions The single most important item in the lawsuit, far more important than the judgement The single most important item in the lawsuit, far more important than the judgement The core of the dispute: what a party had to show in order to win The core of the dispute: what a party had to show in order to win

15 FORMULAE The instructions – prepared according to formulae, composed of “specially prepared phrases” The instructions – prepared according to formulae, composed of “specially prepared phrases” Each formula – divided into parts, and each part had a particular function Each formula – divided into parts, and each part had a particular function Very few actual formulas survived Very few actual formulas survived

16 A FORMULA FOUND NEAR POMPEII, 1ST CENTURY AD “Blossius Celadus shall be the judge. If it appears that C. Marcius Saturninus ought to give 18,000 sesterces to C.Sulpicius Cinnamus, which is the matter in dispute, C. Blossius Celadus, the judge, shall condemn C. Marcius Saturninus for 18,000 sesterces in favour of c. Sulpicius Cinnamus; otherwise he shall absolve” “Blossius Celadus shall be the judge. If it appears that C. Marcius Saturninus ought to give 18,000 sesterces to C.Sulpicius Cinnamus, which is the matter in dispute, C. Blossius Celadus, the judge, shall condemn C. Marcius Saturninus for 18,000 sesterces in favour of c. Sulpicius Cinnamus; otherwise he shall absolve”

17 Procedural contract The parties undertook to abide by the judge’s decision and the judgement was binding The parties undertook to abide by the judge’s decision and the judgement was binding

18 THE TRIAL The trial took place in the forum, an open space used at first as the market place but later used chiefly for judicial proceedings The trial took place in the forum, an open space used at first as the market place but later used chiefly for judicial proceedings

19 Trial Speeches with introduction of evidence, speeches followed by evidence, or a speech for the plaintiff, a speech for the defendant, then evidence on each side, then speeches by way of summing up; or evidence followed by speeches on each side Speeches with introduction of evidence, speeches followed by evidence, or a speech for the plaintiff, a speech for the defendant, then evidence on each side, then speeches by way of summing up; or evidence followed by speeches on each side

20 PRINCIPLES OF PROCEDURE 1. The principle of party representation 1. The principle of party representation 2. The principle of publicity: public participation acts as a restraint of abuses of procedure 2. The principle of publicity: public participation acts as a restraint of abuses of procedure 3. The principle of orality, closely related to the principle of immediacy 3. The principle of orality, closely related to the principle of immediacy

21 THE PRINCIPLE OF IMMEDIACY Preserves the integrity of a judgement by ensuring that arguments and evidence are put to the judge in the most direct manner possible Preserves the integrity of a judgement by ensuring that arguments and evidence are put to the judge in the most direct manner possible One-day rule: pleading, proof, argument and judgement must take place on the same day, the judgment being given before sunset One-day rule: pleading, proof, argument and judgement must take place on the same day, the judgment being given before sunset

22 THE PRINCIPLE OF IMMEDIACY If judgement cannot be given before sunset, the case must begin anew on another day, with at least some of the events of the previous session being repeated If judgement cannot be given before sunset, the case must begin anew on another day, with at least some of the events of the previous session being repeated A judge should have a vivid picture of the case in mind and thereby be less liable to make a mistake A judge should have a vivid picture of the case in mind and thereby be less liable to make a mistake

23 Summary In jure In jure In judicio, or apud judicem In judicio, or apud judicem

24 In jure Purpose: to frame the issues to be tried, Purpose: to frame the issues to be tried, To appoint a judex; To appoint a judex; hearing to decide whether the action should be allowed to the plaintiff hearing to decide whether the action should be allowed to the plaintiff Formula Formula Procedural contract Procedural contract

25 In judicio Trial Trial Speeches Speeches Evidence Evidence Forum Forum Principles of party representation, publicity, orality, immediacy Principles of party representation, publicity, orality, immediacy

26 Legal terms Person asking relief against another person in civil proceedings: Person asking relief against another person in civil proceedings: plaintiff, claimant plaintiff, claimant Person who is sued in a civil action: defendant Person who is sued in a civil action: defendant The written, preliminary settlements of the matters at issue in a dispute that are exchanged between the parties before the trial: The written, preliminary settlements of the matters at issue in a dispute that are exchanged between the parties before the trial: pleadings pleadings

27 Legal terms Try Try to hear civil or criminal trial; voditi sudski postupak to hear civil or criminal trial; voditi sudski postupak Trial Trial The hearing of a civil or criminal case before a court of competent juridiction. Trials must, with rare exceptions, be held in public; suđenje The hearing of a civil or criminal case before a court of competent juridiction. Trials must, with rare exceptions, be held in public; suđenje Hearing Hearing Any appearance of a case before a court, including trial; ročište, saslušanje, rasprava Any appearance of a case before a court, including trial; ročište, saslušanje, rasprava

28 Legal terms Undertake Undertake To promise to do something; obvezati se To promise to do something; obvezati se Abide by Abide by If you abide by a law, agreement, or decision, you do what it says you should do; respect If you abide by a law, agreement, or decision, you do what it says you should do; respect Bind Bind To make someone obey a rule o keep a promise (bound; binding) To make someone obey a rule o keep a promise (bound; binding)

29 Legal terms Arbitrator Arbitrator A person not concerned with a dispute who is chosen by both sides to try to settle it; izabrani sudac A person not concerned with a dispute who is chosen by both sides to try to settle it; izabrani sudac arbitration; arbitrate arbitration; arbitrate

30 Put the verbs in brackets into appropriate forms Since the days of the Law of the Twelve Tables, developed during the early Republic, the Roman legal system _________(characterize, passive) by a formalism that _______(last) for more than years. Since the days of the Law of the Twelve Tables, developed during the early Republic, the Roman legal system _________(characterize, passive) by a formalism that _______(last) for more than years.

31 Put the verbs in brackets into appropriate forms Early Roman law _______(draw, passive) from custom and statutes, but later during the times of the empire, the emperors ______(assert) their authority as the ultimate source of law. Early Roman law _______(draw, passive) from custom and statutes, but later during the times of the empire, the emperors ______(assert) their authority as the ultimate source of law.

32 Put the verbs in brackets into appropriate forms Their edicts, judgments, administrative instructions, and responses to petitions _____(collect, passive) with the comments of legal scholars. "What _____(please) the emperor has the force of law." As the law and scholarly commentaries on it ______(expand), the need _____(grow) to codify and to regularize conflicting opinions. Their edicts, judgments, administrative instructions, and responses to petitions _____(collect, passive) with the comments of legal scholars. "What _____(please) the emperor has the force of law." As the law and scholarly commentaries on it ______(expand), the need _____(grow) to codify and to regularize conflicting opinions.

33 Key Since the days of the Law of the Twelve Tables, developed during the early republic, the Roman legal system was characterized by a formalism that lasted for more than years. Since the days of the Law of the Twelve Tables, developed during the early republic, the Roman legal system was characterized by a formalism that lasted for more than years. Early Roman law was drawn from custom and statutes, but later during the times of the empire, the emperors asserted their authority as the ultimate source of law. Early Roman law was drawn from custom and statutes, but later during the times of the empire, the emperors asserted their authority as the ultimate source of law.

34 Key Their edicts, judgments, administrative instructions, and responses to petitions were all collected with the comments of legal scholars. "What pleases the emperor has the force of law." As the law and scholarly commentaries on it expanded, the need grew to codify and to regularize conflicting opinions. Their edicts, judgments, administrative instructions, and responses to petitions were all collected with the comments of legal scholars. "What pleases the emperor has the force of law." As the law and scholarly commentaries on it expanded, the need grew to codify and to regularize conflicting opinions.

35 Supply the missing words: consequences, fairness, flexibility, form, principles, procedures witnesses The basis for Roman law was the idea that the exact____, not the intention, of words or of actions produced legal____. Romans recognized that there are _____ to actions and words, but not to intentions. Roman civil law allowed great _____in adopting new ideas or extending legal ____in the complex environment of the Empire. Without replacing older laws, the Romans developed alternative ____that allowed greater ______. The basis for Roman law was the idea that the exact____, not the intention, of words or of actions produced legal____. Romans recognized that there are _____ to actions and words, but not to intentions. Roman civil law allowed great _____in adopting new ideas or extending legal ____in the complex environment of the Empire. Without replacing older laws, the Romans developed alternative ____that allowed greater ______.

36 action, flexible, invalid, property, testament For example, a Roman was entitled by law to make a will as he wished, but, if he did not leave his children at least 25 percent of his____, the magistrate would grant them an ____ to have the will declared ____ as an "irresponsible____." Instead of simply changing the law to avoid confusion, the Romans preferred to humanize a rigid system by ____adaptation. For example, a Roman was entitled by law to make a will as he wished, but, if he did not leave his children at least 25 percent of his____, the magistrate would grant them an ____ to have the will declared ____ as an "irresponsible____." Instead of simply changing the law to avoid confusion, the Romans preferred to humanize a rigid system by ____adaptation.

37 Code, collectively, emperor, publish, ruled It was not until much later in the 6th century AD that the ____Justinian I, who ____ over the Byzantine Empire in the east, began to ____a comprehensive ____ of laws, ____known as the Corpus Juris Civilis, but more familiarly as the Justinian Code. It was not until much later in the 6th century AD that the ____Justinian I, who ____ over the Byzantine Empire in the east, began to ____a comprehensive ____ of laws, ____known as the Corpus Juris Civilis, but more familiarly as the Justinian Code.

38 Key The basis for Roman law was the idea that the exact form, not the intention, of words or of actions produced legal consequences. Romans recognized that there are witnesses to actions and words, but not to intentions. Roman civil law allowed great flexibility in adopting new ideas or extending legal principles in the complex environment of the empire. Without replacing older laws, the Romans developed alternative procedures that allowed greater fairness. The basis for Roman law was the idea that the exact form, not the intention, of words or of actions produced legal consequences. Romans recognized that there are witnesses to actions and words, but not to intentions. Roman civil law allowed great flexibility in adopting new ideas or extending legal principles in the complex environment of the empire. Without replacing older laws, the Romans developed alternative procedures that allowed greater fairness.

39 Key For example, a Roman was entitled by law to make a will as he wished, but, if he did not leave his children at least 25 percent of his property, the magistrate would grant them an action to have the will declared invalid as an "irresponsible testament." Instead of simply changing the law to avoid confusion, the Romans preferred to humanize a rigid system by flexible adaptation. For example, a Roman was entitled by law to make a will as he wished, but, if he did not leave his children at least 25 percent of his property, the magistrate would grant them an action to have the will declared invalid as an "irresponsible testament." Instead of simply changing the law to avoid confusion, the Romans preferred to humanize a rigid system by flexible adaptation.

40 Key It was not until much later in the 6th century AD that the emperor Justinian I, who ruled over the Byzantine Empire in the east, began to publish a comprehensive code of laws, collectively known as the Corpus Juris Civilis, but more familiarly as the Justinian Code. It was not until much later in the 6th century AD that the emperor Justinian I, who ruled over the Byzantine Empire in the east, began to publish a comprehensive code of laws, collectively known as the Corpus Juris Civilis, but more familiarly as the Justinian Code.


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