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July 31, 2009 Reforming the Juvenile Justice System in the Nation’s Capital Reforming the Juvenile Justice System in the Nation’s Capital Presentation.

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Presentation on theme: "July 31, 2009 Reforming the Juvenile Justice System in the Nation’s Capital Reforming the Juvenile Justice System in the Nation’s Capital Presentation."— Presentation transcript:

1 July 31, 2009 Reforming the Juvenile Justice System in the Nation’s Capital Reforming the Juvenile Justice System in the Nation’s Capital Presentation by David Muhammad Chief of Committed Services Administration DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services Presentation by David Muhammad Chief of Committed Services Administration DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services

2 July 31, 2009 Background to the reforms 1988 Jerry M Lawsuit: brought against the District of Columbia for its inhumane treatment of youth in its juvenile justice system. The District settles the lawsuit, entering into a Consent Decree.  DC spends many of next 16 years failing to live up to the conditions of the Consent Decree and being threatened with receivership Blue Ribbon Commission on Juvenile Justice: Chaired by the Presiding Judge of the Juvenile Court, Judge Hamilton, the Commission recommends to the DC City Council to close Oak Hill, the city’s dilapidated juvenile facility, adopt the Missouri Model in the facility that replaces Oak Hill, and develop a robust continuum of care of community services.

3 July 31, 2009 Background to the reforms 2003 In re P.S Superior Court Decision: Gives the Executive full authority over placement decisions regarding youth committed to the city’s juvenile justice agency City Council Passes Legislation creating the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS) – and doing away with the old Youth Services Administration) January 2005 New Administration brought in to implement the reform of the city’s juvenile justice system.  Vincent Schiraldi named first Director of DYRS

4 July 31, 2009 Reforms at a Glance

5 July 31, 2009 Institutional Reform Transformed our old jail-like corrections facility with no structured program Implemented the Missouri Model – rehabilitative treatment, Guided Group Interaction Intensive staff training in new DC Model Smaller living units – Larger staff to youth ratio In May 2009, closed old decrypt facility and opened new state of the art facility – New Beginnings Youth Development Center

6 July 31, 2009 Institutional Reform Oak Hill p opulation reduced from 240 in 2004 to 80 in 2008 New Beginnings population reduced from 80 to 60 Oak Hill Academy now Maya Angelou Academy  See Forever Foundation  Extended school day  Five vocational programs  Transitional school in the community

7 July 31, 2009 Oak Hill Youth Center

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11 New Beginnings Youth Development Center

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14 Case Planning & Case Management Decreased case loads Increased resources for Case Managers Structured Decision Making Process  Develop and resource case plans for youth  Validated risk assessment  Mental health assessment  Detailed placement grid  Family group conferencing model  Individual Development Plan

15 July 31, 2009 Case Planning & Case Management Youth Family Team Meeting (YFTM)  Applied to every youth under DYRS care  YFTM convened with youth, family members, staff and community stakeholders who know the youth  Discuss youth’s strengths, needs, and action steps to build on the strengths and serve the needs

16 July 31, 2009 Community Continuum of Care DYRS developed a more robust continuum of care to provide an array of effective services, programs, opportunities, and supports for youth in the juvenile justice system Restructuring its provision of community services into an innovative Regional Service Coalition model In 2009, DYRS will replace its many current, disjointed contracts into a more closely coordinated system where youth receive more and better services in the communities they live

17 July 31, 2009 Positive Youth Development Overriding principle that guides all of DYRS’ reforms A strengths-based approach to serving youth Works to build on young people’s assets, while also protecting the public’s safety

18 July 31, 2009 Football

19 July 31, 2009 White Water Rafting

20 July 31, 2009 Triathlon

21 July 31, 2009 Shakespeare

22 July 31, 2009 UN Convention at Georgetown Law

23 July 31, 2009 Guns to Roses

24 July 31, 2009 Building a Shed

25 July 31, 2009 Principals of the reform Rehabilitation & Treatment arte far more effective and in the long run much less costly than punishment and incarceration. Youth who have exhibited delinquent behavior respond better and benefit more from Positive Youth Development (building on their strengths and assets) than from a punitive, deficit based system Incarceration is inherently harmful – when a youth is locked up, it has a negative affect upon him or her. Therefore, we should only incarcerate youth who are a legitimate risk to the public’s safety.  There are thousands of youth locked up around the country due to bureaucratic convenience, not because they need to be.

26 July 31, 2009 Principals of the reform The Big 5 Challenges or Needs of youth in the juvenile justice system:  Family Support (including Housing)  School/Education Support  Employment Readiness/Job Placement  Drug Treatment  Mental Health Services Part of what makes each of these 5 services effective and probably the greatest need of all youth:  A Healthy Relationship with a Positive Adult

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