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Chemical Safety & the New SDS Regulations. Chemical Hazards.

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Presentation on theme: "Chemical Safety & the New SDS Regulations. Chemical Hazards."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chemical Safety & the New SDS Regulations

2 Chemical Hazards

3 Controlling Exposure

4 Hazard Control Methods Engineering Controls – Ventilation, enclosing operations, closed containers, replacement Administrative Controls – Training, information, limiting exposure time, policy/procedures Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – Safety goggles, gloves, protective clothing Engineering Controls – Ventilation, enclosing operations, closed containers, replacement Administrative Controls – Training, information, limiting exposure time, policy/procedures Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – Safety goggles, gloves, protective clothing

5 ENGINEERING CONTROLS Best Practices Dispense products in accordance with the label, safety data sheet, and other product information Use “closed” feed systems where possible Store products in original container when possible Store incompatible materials separately Keep product containers closed when not in use Mix products only in accordance with product instructions Use flammable and volatile chemicals only in well ventilation areas Dispense products in accordance with the label, safety data sheet, and other product information Use “closed” feed systems where possible Store products in original container when possible Store incompatible materials separately Keep product containers closed when not in use Mix products only in accordance with product instructions Use flammable and volatile chemicals only in well ventilation areas

6 ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS Best Practices Read and follow label and safety data sheet warnings and instructions Post information regarding your hazard communication process and chemicals Properly plan your work to limit chemical exposure time. Inspect containers and feed systems before use Wash hands and face after handling chemicals Read and follow label and safety data sheet warnings and instructions Post information regarding your hazard communication process and chemicals Properly plan your work to limit chemical exposure time. Inspect containers and feed systems before use Wash hands and face after handling chemicals

7 Know the location of emergency equipment (eyewash, showers, etc.) Follow SDS regarding personal protective equipment Use goggles and face shields when splash hazards are present Use gloves appropriate for the hazard (check SDS) Gas Monitors Know the location of emergency equipment (eyewash, showers, etc.) Follow SDS regarding personal protective equipment Use goggles and face shields when splash hazards are present Use gloves appropriate for the hazard (check SDS) Gas Monitors PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Best Practices

8 Emergency Actions If exposure occurs: Eye Contact – Flush for 15 minutes – Seek medical attention Inhalation – Move to fresh air – Seek medical attention Ingestion – Seek medical attention – Consult SDS Skin Contact – Remove contaminated clothing – Rinse skin for a minimum of 15 minutes If exposure occurs: Eye Contact – Flush for 15 minutes – Seek medical attention Inhalation – Move to fresh air – Seek medical attention Ingestion – Seek medical attention – Consult SDS Skin Contact – Remove contaminated clothing – Rinse skin for a minimum of 15 minutes

9 Chemical Hazard Communication

10 Objectives Basics of Chemical Hazard Communication Responsibilities Chemical Hazard Concepts Container Labeling Safety Data Sheets Controlling Exposure Basics of Chemical Hazard Communication Responsibilities Chemical Hazard Concepts Container Labeling Safety Data Sheets Controlling Exposure

11 What is Hazard Communication? Hazard Communication is a process that helps you understand and control the hazards of chemicals in your work environment. You have a legal “Right-to-Know” about the hazards of the chemicals you work with. Regulations establishing this have been in place for decades. Hazard Communication is a process that helps you understand and control the hazards of chemicals in your work environment. You have a legal “Right-to-Know” about the hazards of the chemicals you work with. Regulations establishing this have been in place for decades.

12 A Shared Process 12 Manufacturer, Importer, Distributor Employer Employees Contractors

13 Responsibilities

14 Manufacturer Responsibilities 14 Manufacturer, Importer, Distributor Employer Employees Contractors Evaluate hazards of the products they produce or import. Provide information such as product labels and safety data sheets.

15 Employer Responsibilities Manufacturer, Importer, Distributor Employer Employees Contractors Provide training and information to employees and contractors. Maintain labels, chemical inventory and safety data sheets Develop policies Maintain a written communication program. 15

16 Employee Responsibilities Participate in training Know how to obtain chemical hazard information Review and follow label and safety data sheet instructions before product handling and use Follow other policies and procedures Never work with a chemical you are unfamiliar with 16 Employees Contractors

17 Chemical Hazard Concepts

18 Chemical Affects 18 Chronic Effects Acute Effects Dosage Amount of hazardous material you are exposed to Short-term effects that usually disappear when you are no longer exposed Long-term effects that develop over a period of exposure Match the term with its explanation below.

19  Direct contact  Skin absorption  Eye absorption  Inhalation  Ingestion  Injection (punctures) Chemical Exposure Routes 19

20 Health Hazards – Key Terms 20 HazardDescription Corrosives Substances that can cause irreversible damage to the eye, skin or respiratory system. Irritant Can cause a reversible inflammatory effect on eyes, skin and respiratory system. Sensitizers Induces an allergic reaction / response to the respiratory system or skin – often upon repeat contact. Toxic Capable of causing serious injury or death dependent upon exposure dose. Carcinogen Can induce cancer or increase its incidence. Mutagen Can cause change to genetic material in cells. Reproductive Toxin Can cause adverse effects to sexual function, fertility or development of offspring. Pesticides Substances intended for preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating any pest. Biocides are a subset.

21 Physical Hazards – Key Terms 21 HazardDescription Flammable Liquid with a flash point < 140 o F. Flash point is the temperature at which a liquid gives off enough vapor to ignite in the presence of an ignition source. Combustible Liquid with a flashpoint >140 o F and <200 o F. Oxidizer Material that can yield oxygen, thereby contributing to the combustion of other materials. Reactive Material (liquid, solid or gas) that is thermally unstable and can undergo violent reaction by itself or in combination with other materials (e.g. water reactive). Organic Peroxide Special designation of reactive chemicals which may undergo exothermic decomposition. May burn rapidly, be sensitive to shock or friction, or react with other substances. Others Flammable solids / gases, explosives, gases under pressure, self- heating chemicals

22 Container Labeling

23 National Fire Protection Association 23

24 Hazardous Materials Identification System 24

25 Example 25

26 Pesticide / Biocide Label 26

27 Department of Transportation (DOT) 27

28 Upcoming Changes Globally Harmonized System for Classification and Labeling of Chemicals - GHS United Nations (UN) international mandate to standardize classification, labeling, safety data sheets and hazard symbols Being implemented around the world – Varying schedules – US – 2012 to 2015 – Canada - TBD Globally Harmonized System for Classification and Labeling of Chemicals - GHS United Nations (UN) international mandate to standardize classification, labeling, safety data sheets and hazard symbols Being implemented around the world – Varying schedules – US – 2012 to 2015 – Canada - TBD

29 New GHS Label Elements New Signal Words – “Warning” – less severe hazard – “Danger” – more severe hazard Standardized Hazard Statements – Examples – “Highly flammable liquid and vapor”, “Causes skin irritation” Standardized Precautionary Statements – Examples – “Wear protective gloves”, “Do not breathe vapors” Pictograms New Signal Words – “Warning” – less severe hazard – “Danger” – more severe hazard Standardized Hazard Statements – Examples – “Highly flammable liquid and vapor”, “Causes skin irritation” Standardized Precautionary Statements – Examples – “Wear protective gloves”, “Do not breathe vapors” Pictograms

30 Pictograms – Fire Hazards Flammable Pyrophoric Self-Heating Emits Flammable Gas Self-Reactive Organic Peroxide Oxidizer Flame Flame Over Circle 30

31 Pictograms – Health Hazards Skin Corrosion / Burns Eye Damage Corrosive to Metal Irritant (skin and eye) Skin Sensitizer Acute Toxicity (harmful) Narcotic Effects Respiratory Tract Irritant Hazardous to Ozone Layer (environmental) Corrosion Exclamation Mark 31

32 Pictograms – Health Hazards Carcinogen Mutagenicity Reproductive Toxicity Respiratory Sensitizer Target Organ Toxicity Aspiration Toxicity Acute Toxicity (Fatal or Toxic) Health Hazard Skull & Crossbones 32

33 Pictograms – Physical Hazards Explosives Self-Reactive Organic Peroxide Gases Under Pressure Exploding Bomb Gas Cylinder 33

34 Pictograms – Environmental Hazard Aquatic Toxicity Environment 34 The Environmental Pictogram is non-mandatory for products sold in the United States.

35 Required Label Elements 35

36 The common name of the product, along with any other identifiers (e.g. product number) must be prominently displayed. 36

37 The name, address and telephone number of the manufacturer, importer or other responsible party must be listed. 37

38 The GHS pictograms for the product are also displayed. In this example, “Health” and “Fire” hazards. 38

39 The appropriate Signal Word is listed. Remember, “Danger” indicates a higher degree of hazard than “Warning”. 39

40 The appropriate Hazard Statements are given. In this case, representing the degree of flammability and the target organ potentially impacted (toxicity). 40

41 Precautionary Statements related to the Health and Fire hazards are displayed. Note there are statements related to Prevention, Response, Storage and Disposal. These statements are largely standardized by regulation, with the manufacturer adding additional information. 41

42 Additional, non-mandatory information can be added by the product manufacturer. May not conflict with or contradict other hazard information 42

43 Going Forward In-House, HMIS, and NFPA labels will become less prominent as manufacturers move to the GHS labeling system through DOT and pesticide labels will remain until additional regulations are promulgated.

44 Safety Data Sheets

45 General Requirements Must be available for each hazardous chemical used Must be in English but can also be made available in other languages GHS requires a 16 section standardized format. Previously, manufacturers could choose the format. GHS-compliant SDS must be in place no later than Must be available for each hazardous chemical used Must be in English but can also be made available in other languages GHS requires a 16 section standardized format. Previously, manufacturers could choose the format. GHS-compliant SDS must be in place no later than 2015.

46 SDS Required Elements 1. Identification 2. Hazard Identification 3. Composition Information 4. First-Aid Measures 5. Fire-Fighting Measures 6. Accidental release measures 7. Handling and Storage 8. Exposure Controls / Personal Protection 9. Physical and Chemical Properties 10. Stability and Reactivity 11. Toxicological Information 12. Ecological Information 13. Disposal Considerations 14. Transport Information 15. Regulatory Information 16. Other Information 46

47 47 Section 2 describes the product hazard and includes many of the same elements as the label – Signal Words, Pictograms, Hazard Statements, and Precautionary Statements.

48 48 Our SDS describes hazards both “As Sold” and “At Use Dilution”. “Use Dilution” hazard are more representative of the product as used by the customer. Most chemical manufacturers do not provide this.

49 49 Section 4 includes important instructions should you be exposed to the product.

50 50 Section 7 includes details for proper storage and handling practices. Section 8 outlines needed exposure control measures, including necessary personal protective equipment.

51 Obtaining SDS Ecolab / PureForce product SDS available through Customers must have a system for making SDS available to all product users at their facilities Ecolab / PureForce product SDS available through Customers must have a system for making SDS available to all product users at their facilities

52 Product Disposal Guidelines You are responsible for product disposal Products may be classified as hazardous waste due to characteristics such as corrositivity or flammability Only a licensed hazardous waste disposal company Never pour product into a drain unless the SDS indicates it is safe to do so You are responsible for product disposal Products may be classified as hazardous waste due to characteristics such as corrositivity or flammability Only a licensed hazardous waste disposal company Never pour product into a drain unless the SDS indicates it is safe to do so

53 Questions?


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