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FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP 6 th FSP Meeting Presented by: Stuart Blofeld Secretary - Flooring.

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Presentation on theme: "FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP 6 th FSP Meeting Presented by: Stuart Blofeld Secretary - Flooring."— Presentation transcript:

1 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP 6 th FSP Meeting Presented by: Stuart Blofeld Secretary - Flooring Sustainability Partnership Date: 21/02/2012

2 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP Welcome from Chairman

3 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP Introductions

4 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP Agenda  WelcomeRichard Catt  IntroductionsAll  Minutes of 5th FSP Meeting Richard Catt  Matters ArisingRichard Catt  FREP Progress Report 2011 – Member questionnaireStuart Blofeld  The impact of REACH Regs on the Vinyl flooring Alan Best  New ChairmanRichard Catt  Secretariat 2012/13All  Flooring Product Category RulesStuart Blofeld  AOB  Date of Next meeting

5 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP 5 th FSP Meeting Minutes & Matters Arising

6 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP FREP Progress Report 2011 & FSP member questionnaire Stuart Blofeld

7 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP 1.As an existing FSP member how important do you view its role (in improving resource efficiency and reducing waste) across the flooring industry? 2.Do you believe your business/organisation has benefited from being a member of FSP? Can you provide any specific examples where you have benefited. 3.Has being a member of the FSP led to any changes to your business practices in how you deal with and/or address waste issues in your sector? 4.Can you please provide specific details of what actions your company taken during 2011 to address waste issues within the flooring sector? 5.Are there any specific projects delivered in the past year that would make a good case study that could be featured in the TREP 2011 progress report? 6.Do you have any quantifiable data on the reductions in flooring waste arisings achieved in 2011, and/or decreases in flooring waste sent to landfill? 7.Do you have any specific plans for 2012 to tackle flooring waste within your sector? 8.Do you have any other comments or issues that you would like captured that could inform the 2011 FSP Progress Report, or other areas FSP should consider in its future work programme? FSP member questionnaire

8 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP The impact of REACH Regs on the Vinyl flooring sector and recycling Alan Best

9 REACH AND THE VINYL SECTOR

10 REACH Registration Evaluation and Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals some principles REACH sets out to impose on the whole industrial supply chain from producer to downstream user, the same basic environmental and human health regulations as pharmaceuticals and pesticides. REACH sets out to systematically assess the safety of chemicals to ensure that their risks are fully understood and managed and to encourage the substitution and innovation of those that are hazardous and for which they may be better alternatives! 10

11 REACH Administered by ECHA – Helsinki, HSE - UK Pre-registrations – They thought ,000 30,000 substances Actual 2.75 million pre-registrations 140,000 substances 60,000 companies SIEF’SegTitanium Dioxide 3000 members Cost to industry15p to £1/kilo

12 REACH SUBSTANCES OF VERY HIGH CONCERN SVHC’S

13 REACH Substances of Very High Concern SVHC’s Persistent, Bioaccumulative and Toxic Very Persistent and very Bioaccumulative Carcinogenic, Mutagenic, disruptors of Reproduction category1&2 Or of equivalent concern 13

14 Substances of Very High Concern SVHC’s per February 2012 Candidate list for authorisation by ECHA (currently 73 chemicals) Registry of intentions for Annex XV dossiers – Submitted SVHC proposal intentions – Current SVHC proposal intentions – Most low molecular weight phthalates e.g DEHP, DBP, DIBP and BBP – severe restriction on their use imposed particularly children’s toys 14

15 REACH AND WASTE: In general recovered polymer collected and sorted from a waste stream and blended or moulded via a manufacturing process to produce an article such as playground furniture is not required to register under REACH legal requirements. However, if such an article contains an SVHC then this must be notified to the ECHA if: the article contains more than 0.1% of an SVHC and the volumes produced/imported are greater that one tonne of that SVHC per annum –NEED TO INFORM CUSTOMER Substances on the candidate list on 1 December 2010 had to be notified to the ECHA no later than 1 June Substances placed on the candidate after 1 December 2010 must be notified within 6 months of the article being put on the candidate list. Notification is free

16 PVC A REVOLUTIONARY IMPACT PARTICULARY ON PLUMBING AND MUNICIPAL WASTE CHEMICAL RESISTANCE LIGHT WEIGHT LOW COST Constantly changing chemical picture

17

18 oil Ethylene Salt Chlorine Vinyl Chloride Monomer (VCM) Polyvinyl Chloride Additives Fabricated Article PVC Manufacturing process

19 oil Ethylene Salt Chlorine Vinyl Chloride Monomer (VCM) Polyvinyl Chloride Additives Fabricated Article PVC Manufacturing process

20 PVC Health and Safety Issues Vinyl Chloride Monomer is a known carcinogen which has affected workers – vinyl chloride disease Organochlorines are Persistent Organic Pollutants - POP’s Products of incineration of finished product and manufacturing bi-products can include dioxins e.g. ethylene dioxide tars – incineration at sea banned ‘91 Additives include heavy metals and potential endocrine disruptors eg phthalate esters. To some extent balanced by a contribution to safe handling of sewage in non developed countries.

21 PVC and other Organochlorines

22 Persistent orgnanochlorine compounds detected in mothers milk e.g HCB (Hexachlorobenzene) Fungicide – carcinogen HCH(hexachlorocyclohexane) Insecticide - liver and kidney toxin. DDT (Dichloro-Diphenyl-Trichloroethane) Pesticide- Suspected toxic to humans and suspect carcinogen. PBDE polybrominated diphenyl ether – fire retardant linked to autism PCDD/PCDF (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDFs)- dioxinlike – toxic PCB’s (polychlorinated biphenyls) widely used fire retardant, pvc stabiser. Banned and toxic Health Risks from organochorine products POP’S - Persitent Organic Pollutants

23 Off Gassing Chemicals VOC’s detected in buildings at levels higher than external air formaldehyde nonanal trimethylbenzene decanal Diethyl phthalate Dibutyl phthalate xylene Flooring and the indoor air quality POP’s

24 Dioxins The most toxic dioxin is TCDD and most of the available data refer to this compound Emits toxic fumes of hydrogen chloride and chlorine when heated to decomposition or on exposure to UV light TCDD is classified as a causing cancer in humans TCDD produces a range of toxic effects on reproduction relating to both fertility and developmental toxicity Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin

25 SOURCES OF DIOXINS Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) natural sources such as volcanoes and forest fires – as with radiation which occurs naturally it doesn’t mean we should release any more of it for the planet to cope with. by-products in the manufacture of some Organochlorines – Largest is PVC others from process- tetrafluoroethane which is used in the manufacture of Teflon and similar stain repellent - long chain fluoropolymers withdrawn incineration of chlorine-containing substances such as PVC chlorine bleaching of paper Manufactured as herbicidal warfare chemical “Agent Orange”

26 SOME MAJOR DIOXINS INCIDENTS Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) 1949 Monsanto Virginia 1963 Philips Duphar plant Amsterdam 1965 – 68 Spolana Neratovice plant Czechoslovakia 1976 Seveso – Italy – Seveso Directive 1978 Love Canal Niagra Falls 1982 – 85 Times Beach, Missouri 1999 Dioxin Crisis in Belgium 2001 World Trade Centre 2008 Irish Pork Crisis

27 Dioxins and other Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP’s) are subject to the 2004 Stockholm Convention The treaty obliges signatories to take measures to eliminate where possible, and minimize where not possible to eliminate, all sources of dioxin International Response to Dioxin Contamination Incidents

28 PVC ADDITIVES

29 Heat Stabilisers – LEAD, CADMIUM – PREVENT LOSS OF HCL UV Stabilisers Lubricants Processing Aids Impact modifiers Thermal modifiers Fillers Flame retardants Biocides e.g phenols Blowing agents Smoke suppressors Pigments PLASTICISERS - PHTHALATES

30 PHTHALATE ESTERS LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT E.g DEHP, – REACH SVHC – WITHDRAWN by2015 Being phased out by pvc industry HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT – being phased in Said to be positive regarding SAFE use and all REACH registered (no choice in the matter) DINP – REACH RESTRICTED LIST TOXICITY TRIALS LIMITED TO SHORT TERM STUDIES e.g 90 day and 130 day studies. Long term study results awaited

31 “ECHA considers that the available new information with regard to hazards and uses of and exposure to DINP does not bring a new perspective to the assessments which were carried out in the past and used as a basis for the current restrictions on DINP. Even though further in-depth assessment of the currently available information, and potentially further new information, would be needed to draw firm conclusions on the exact level of risks from certain uses of DINP, this information does not indicate the need for an urgent re-examination of the existing restriction on DINP. Therefore, ECHA suggests to wait for all the registration dossiers to be submitted for DINP by the first registration deadline, after which the Commission may decide whether specific aspects of these registration dossier(s) should be assessed to confirm or contest the conclusion of this review, that there is no need to re-examine the current restriction ” REACH AND DINP

32 ChemSec SIN LIST European Chemicals Pressure Groups

33 The SIN LIST “Substitute it Now” A growing list of 378 chemicals that Chemsec is urging governments to phase out through REACH Legislation which it claims is moving too slowly. Chemsec’s board are WWF, Swedish Society for Natural Conservation, Friends of the Earth, Nature and Youth Funded by Swedish Govt. John Merck Fund, Swedish EPA, German EPA, European Parliament, Sigrid Rausing Trust, Greenpeace

34 The SIN LIST “Substitute it Now” Supporting Companies Actively Following the SIN List SVHC B & QBOOTSDELLL’OREAL NOKIASARA LEESKANSKAERICKSSON IKEAH & MELECTROLUX

35 How does the recycler look for phthalates on the REACH SVHC OR SIN LIST? Potential research project with the REACH Centre Lancaster University for a practical analytical tool which can be used by recycling contractors

36 The REACH Centre Lancaster University- Jonathan Lutwyche CEO The REACH Centre are aiming to producing a simple, cost effective test for the identification of phthalates contained in plastic components. A program of work has been developed in which a combination of 'lab-on-a-chip' technology and efficient chemical methodology will be co-developed to provide a novel semi-quantitative analytical protocol for phthalate detection. By achieving this, The REACH Centre and collaborating bodies will be able to develop a world leading position in the testing and management of phthalates.

37 The REACH Centre Lancaster University- Jonathan Lutwyche CEO Phthalates esters (usually referred to as ‘phthalates’) belong to a group of man-made chemical substances that are used as plasticisers in polymers, primarily PVC, where levels can be as high as 40 – 50% by weight. Phthalates are endocrine disruptors and have been implicated in a variety of health problems. Four of them in particular (DEHP, DBP, DIBP and BBP) have been placed on various ‘substances of concern’ lists around the world and severe restrictions on their use, particularly in textiles, flooring and children’s toys, are being imposed. Full-scale testing can be an expensive activity, especially in cases where a particular product or component is obtained from several different suppliers. An inexpensive in-field screening protocol would provide a mechanism to reduce the requirement for full analytical testing by identifying those cases where it is necessary and those where it is not. The REACH Centre are aiming to producing a simple, cost effective test for the identification of phthalates contained in plastic components. A program of work has been developed in which a combination of 'lab-on- a-chip' technology and efficient chemical methodology will be co-developed to provide a novel semi- quantitative analytical protocol for phthalate detection. By achieving this, The REACH Centre and collaborating bodies will be able to develop a world leading position in the testing and management of phthalates. During 2011, practical work on the development of this new approach to testing of phthalates in plastics commenced. Initial studies were carried out to assess the impact of solvent, temperature, time and sample particle size on extraction efficiency. The aim of this practical work was to identify the mildest and most benign experimental conditions under which phthalates can be extracted reliably from plastics. The conclusions of this work will be used to underpin the design of a new spot test for rapid and hopefully non- destructive testing of phthalates in articles. In addition to the practical work, a literature review was undertaken. The methodology for phthalate sequestration, hydrolysis and complexation have all been investigated with a view to developing a selective colorimetric response to phthalate esters. The REACH Centre is now seeking collaborative partners and funding to progress the work.

38 FURTHER INFORMATION ALAN BEST REACH CENTRE LANCASTER UNIVERSITY REACH READY HSE

39 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP New Chair Person & Secretariat 2012/13

40 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP Secretariat support No.CompanyConfirmed £500 member fee 1CRUK£500 2Recofloor (on behalf of Altro and Polyflor)£500 3Shaw Industries£500 4Interface Europe£500 5Headlam£500 6FeRFA£500 7Karndean£500 8CFA£500 9Anglo Recycling£500 £4,500

41 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP Flooring Product Category Rules Project: Produce Product Category Rules (PCRs) appropriate for recycling and recovery of post installation and post consumer flooring Will allow comparative Life Cycle Assessments to be carried out between different end of life processes on flooring waste materials – e.g. impact of landfilling, vs energy from waste, vs recycling, vs reuse etc Draft Flooring PCR uidance to be complete 9 th March 2012 for dissemination to FSP members

42 FLOORING SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP AOB & Date of Next meeting


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