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Evo-Ed: A Case-based Approach to Teaching Evolution Peter White, Merle Heidemann, and Jim Smith Michigan State University East Lansing, MI USA.

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Presentation on theme: "Evo-Ed: A Case-based Approach to Teaching Evolution Peter White, Merle Heidemann, and Jim Smith Michigan State University East Lansing, MI USA."— Presentation transcript:

1 Evo-Ed: A Case-based Approach to Teaching Evolution Peter White, Merle Heidemann, and Jim Smith Michigan State University East Lansing, MI USA

2 How do students understand the theory of evolution?

3 Evolution = Natural Selection

4 How do faculty understand the theory of evolution?

5 Word cloud of the Aims and Scope of journals that have “Evolution” in their title

6 Evolution is cross-disciplinary.

7 Oftentimes, students complete their biology education without fully understanding how well supported the theory of evolution is. Moore, 2008

8 Traditional undergraduate instruction does not necessarily help students understand evolution.

9 The Two-Track Problem From: White et al. 2013

10 Help students understand evolution as an integrative biological theory that spans across biological sub-disciplines. Provide resources for science instructors so they can teach evolution as an integrative biological theory. Evo-Ed: Development of integrative cases that explore trait evolution across biological scales.

11 Trichromatic Vision Evolution in Primates Fur Color Evolution in Beach Mice Toxin Resistance Evolution in Clams Seed Taste Evolution in Field Peas

12 “What does a Case look like?”

13 Splash Page has brief descriptions of cases and links to resources

14

15 Case Splash Page has links to different aspects of the biology

16

17 https://www.msu.edu/course/lb/145/smith/s13/index.html Mouse Case: A Sample Lesson

18 Learning Objectives Backward Design (Wiggins & McTighe 2005)

19 Assessment

20 Exam

21 Instructional Activities

22

23 The Case of Fur Color Evolution in Beach Mice or Slide Set Available from

24 Select a Set of Mouse Case PowerPoint Slides

25 Questions: – What question(s) do you have about the integrative case approach? – Discuss your question(s) with the person sitting next to you. – Debrief together.

26 Support for an integrated approach?

27

28 American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2011

29 Is there a relationship between the case approach and learning? The Evo-Ed Project: – A Case Approach to Evolution Education – Integrative cases that explore trait evolution across biological scales.

30 The Assessment Tool for Evaluating Evolution Knowledge (ATEEK) -Iterative design process (Anderson and Bishop 1990) 1.Determine essential concepts important to evolution. 2.Design an assessment tool that probes for those concepts. 3.Field test the assessment tool. 4.Evaluate student responses. Revise a given question if the pattern of responses differs from the expected pattern. 5.Field test the revised assessment tool. 6.Repeat steps 4 and 5 until satisfied with the pattern of answers.

31 The ATEEK Q1. Jaguars can have an orange coat or a black coat. Orange jaguars have either two G alleles or one G allele and one g allele, whereas black jaguars have two g alleles. When a jaguar has the genotype gg, what happens inside its cells so that a black coat is produced? Q2. Toxican mushrooms contain a toxin that causes vomiting when ingested. Recently, some Toxican mushrooms were found that did not produce the toxin. Describe in detail what might have happened at the molecular level so that these mushrooms no longer produce this toxin? Q3. The non-poisonous Toxican mushroom has become more frequent in mushroom populations and poisonous Toxican mushrooms have become rare. Define Natural Selection and use it to explain this scenario. Q4. Considering genetic mutation – (i)Describe, at the molecular level, what a mutation is. (ii)Use your answer from part (i) to describe the process whereby a mutation results in a change at the phenotype level. Q1. Jaguars can have an orange coat or a black coat. Orange jaguars have either two G alleles or one G allele and one g allele, whereas black jaguars have two g alleles. When a jaguar has the genotype gg, what happens inside its cells so that a black coat is produced? Q2. Toxican mushrooms contain a toxin that causes vomiting when ingested. Recently, some Toxican mushrooms were found that did not produce the toxin. Describe in detail what might have happened at the molecular level so that these mushrooms no longer produce this toxin? Q3. The non-poisonous Toxican mushroom has become more frequent in mushroom populations and poisonous Toxican mushrooms have become rare. Define Natural Selection and use it to explain this scenario. Q4. Considering genetic mutation – (i)Describe, at the molecular level, what a mutation is. (ii)Use your answer from part (i) to describe the process whereby a mutation results in a change at the phenotype level.

32 Scoring the ATEEK -A response could be scored as 0, 1, or 2. -0: Answer is wrong of mostly wrong. -1: Answer is partially right. -2: Answer is completely correct or mostly correct. -Average student GAIN calculated for each question GAIN = Post-Course ATEEK Score – Pre-Course ATEEK Score

33 Gain (post-course – pre-course) Learned evolution using integrative cases Did not learn evolution using integrative cases Q1: Jaguars can have an orange coat or a black coat. Orange jaguars have either two G alleles or one G allele and one g allele, whereas black jaguars have two g alleles. When a jaguar has the genotype gg, what happens inside its cells so that a black coat is produced?

34 Learned evolution using integrative cases Did not learn evolution using integrative cases Gain (post-course – pre-course) Q2: Toxican mushrooms contain a toxin that causes vomiting when ingested. Recently, some Toxican mushrooms were found that did not produce the toxin. Describe in detail what might have happened at the molecular level so that these mushrooms no longer produce this toxin?

35 Q3: The non-poisonous Toxican mushroom has become more frequent in mushroom populations and poisonous Toxican mushrooms have become rare. Define Natural Selection and use it to explain this scenario. Gain (post-course – pre-course) Learned evolution using integrative cases Did not learn evolution using integrative cases

36 Learned evolution using integrative cases Did not learn evolution using integrative cases Gain (post-course – pre-course) Q4i: Considering genetic mutation – Describe, at the molecular level, what a mutation is.

37 Learned evolution using integrative cases Did not learn evolution using integrative cases Gain (post-course – pre-course) Q4ii: Use your answer from part (i) to describe the process whereby a mutation results in a change at the phenotype level.

38 Questions? Discussion?

39 Acknowledgements: Partial support for this work was provided by the NSF TUES program under Award No Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. Thanks to Kathis Ellis, Joe Murray, Miles Loh, Mark Kauth, Kendra Cheruvelil, Chuck Elzinga, Jerry Urquhart, Cheryl Murphy, Andy Jarosz, Doug Luckie, Richard Lenski, Craig Nelson and Lyman Briggs College for their contributions to the project. Questions?


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