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Learning Strategy Project By: Rachel Merren. Graphic Organizers Visual and Graphic Use Symbols and Arrows Organize Information Promote the “Big Picture”

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Presentation on theme: "Learning Strategy Project By: Rachel Merren. Graphic Organizers Visual and Graphic Use Symbols and Arrows Organize Information Promote the “Big Picture”"— Presentation transcript:

1 Learning Strategy Project By: Rachel Merren

2 Graphic Organizers Visual and Graphic Use Symbols and Arrows Organize Information Promote the “Big Picture” Infinite Number of Styles What Are Graphic Organizers? See Reference Page

3 Allow students to organize information to where they can visualize their own understanding Help students separate the important information from the non-essential information convert seemingly disjointed information into a structured, simple-to-read, graphic display conceptual understanding by fitting isolated bits of information together to form a big picture Graphic Organizers (Gregory & Chapman, 2007). (Zemelman, Daniels, & Hyde, 2005). Help students (Col, 1996). Build (Hyerle, 1996).

4 Give students a copy of the matrix with row and column labels filled in. Have students anticipate how the matrix can be used. Read the application problem twice. Lead students through filling out the matrix. Write the equation based on the “Total” column. In the future, students will need to determine their own labels for the rows and columns. Lead them through this process: Rows “What are you comparing?” Columns “What do you know in general?”

5 Read the following problem twice. Write an equation that could be used to solve the problem. Ruth makes $5 an hour working after school and $6 an hour working on Saturdays. Last week she made $64.50 by working a total of 12 hours. How many hours did she work on Saturday? Total Saturday Earnings Total Weekday Earnings Total Amount Earned

6 Read the following problem twice. Write an equation that could be used to find the correct solution. Tickets for the senior class play cost $6 for adults and $3 for students. A total of 846 tickets worth $3846 were sold. How many student tickets were sold?

7 Thirty students bought pennants for the football game. Plain pennants cost $4 each and fancy ones cost $8 each. If the total bill was $168, how many students bought the fancy pennants? Number x Price = Cost Fancy Plain

8 Adult tickets for the game cost $4 each and student tickets cost $2 each. A total of 920 tickets worth $2446 were sold. How many student tickets were sold? Adult Student Number x Price = Cost 4242 a a 4a4a 2 (920 – a) 4a + 2(920 – a) = 2446 Are you ready for the Post-Test?

9 Read the following problem twice. Write an equation that could be used to find the correct solution. Tickets for the senior class play cost $6 for adults and $3 for students. A total of 846 tickets worth $3846 were sold. How many student tickets were sold? Katie’s garden, which is 6 meters wide, has the same area as Courtney’s garden, which is 8 meters wide. Find the lengths of the two rectangular gardens if Katie’s garden is 3 meters longer than Courtney’s garden. (Remember: length x width = area)

10 Col, J. (1996). Graphic Organizers. Retrieved June 7, 2008, from Gregory, G., & Chapman, C. (2007). Differentiated Instructional Strategies: One Size Doesn’t Fit All. (2 nd ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Hall, T., & Strangman, N. (2002). Graphic Organizers. Wakefield, MA: National Center of Accessing the General Curriculum. Retrieved June 7, 2008, from Hyerle, D. (1996). Visual Tools for Constructing Knowledge. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Marzano, R., Pickering, D., & Pollock, J. (2001). Classroom Instruction that Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Zemelman, S., Daniels, H., & Hyde, A. (2005). Best Practices: Today’s Standards for Teaching & Learning in America’s Schools (3 rd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

11 Gabriel worked 16 hours last week. He earned $5 per hour at a local restaurant and $5.50 per hour at a grocery store. If he earned a total of $82, how many hours did he work at the grocery store? Restaurant Grocery Store # Hours x Wage = Income r 16 - r 5r5r 5.5(16 – r) 5r (16 – r) = 82


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