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Make it Sticky! Using Technology to Develop Language and Communication Skills in the Early Childhood Classroom Cherie.

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Presentation on theme: "Make it Sticky! Using Technology to Develop Language and Communication Skills in the Early Childhood Classroom Cherie."— Presentation transcript:

1 Make it Sticky! Using Technology to Develop Language and Communication Skills in the Early Childhood Classroom Cherie Cooper Donna McLauchlin Region 4 Education Specialists April 7, 2011

2 Session Norms Get comfortable Set cell phones on vibrate Actively participate Share ideas and ask questions Take care of your needs Learn and have fun

3 Session Goals Understand the basics of language development Identify opportunities throughout the school day to integrate technology in order to increase receptive and expressive language skills Gain information about a variety of low tech and high tech strategies to engage young learners and increase communication in multiple settings

4 Is it Sticky? Is it interesting for the child? Is there an emotional connection? Are there opportunities for repetition and rehearsal? Is material presented in a way that fosters “chunking”? Is material presented in multiple formats? Is the material presented in all modalities? How the Brain Learns by David A. Sousa

5 Language Development Why do we communicate?

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12 Core Vocabulary Statistics…70-90% ( words)

13 Core Language First 10 words: All done Different Help Mine More Not/don’t Stop That Want What

14 Don’t be a Language Stealer

15 Pixon Project

16 What is Assistive Technology? The term `assistive technology device' means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of a child with a disability.

17 Which is Better? High Tech or Low Tech?

18 Communication vs. Participation

19 True Communication Being able to say what I want to say, to whoever I want to say it to, whenever I want to say it

20 Embedding Language and Communication Environmental Supports Arrival Circle Time Music and Movement Teacher Led Instruction Literacy Math Student Led Instruction

21 Environmental Supports Schedules Routines Expectations Transition Cues and Prompts Communication Boards Communication Devices

22 Arrival Welcome Arrival routine Choosing an arrival activity Transition to circle

23 Circle Time Hello song Who is here today? Personal information activities Social-emotional activities Calendar activities

24 Music and Movement Song choice Props and visuals Musical instruments Repetition of simple verses

25 …a data-driven review by Northwestern University researchers that will be published July 20 in Nature Reviews Neuroscience pulls together converging research from the scientific literature linking musical training to learning that spills over to skills including language, speech, memory, attention and even vocal emotion. The science covered comes from labs all over the world, from scientists of varying scientific philosophies, using a wide range of research methods. Neuroscience News, April 4th 2011

26 Making Literacy Activities Sticky Choosing Literature Repetitive Developmentally appropriate Rich in thematic unit vocabulary Presentation of literature Book Flannel board Puppets Interactive

27 Literacy Song choice Vocabulary building Word walls Requesting and commenting Mystery box Action words Sharing stories

28 Word Wall

29 The Farmer Didn’t Wake Up

30 Neuroplasticity Practice, practice, practice. Repeating an activity, retrieving a memory, and reviewing material in a variety of ways helps build thicker, stronger, more hard- wired connections in the brain.

31 Put information in context. "Whenever new material is presented in such a way that students see relationships between concepts, they generate greater brain cell activity and achieve more successful long-term memory storage and retrieval.” Judy Willis, Neurologist Put information in context. "Whenever new material is presented in such a way that students see relationships between concepts, they generate greater brain cell activity and achieve more successful long-term memory storage and retrieval.” Judy Willis, Neurologist

32 …it's necessary for learners to attach a new piece of information to an old one, or it just won't stick. The brain stores information in the form of neural pathways, or networks. If a student acquires new information that's unrelated to anything already stored in his brain, it's tough for the new information to get into those networks because it has no scaffolding to cling to. Judy Willis, Neurologist

33 Brain-Soothing Tips Judy Willis points to the following strategies for helping students, and their brains, feel comfortable: From Edutopia, based-learning-emotional-safetyhttp://www.edutopia.org/neuroscience-brain- based-learning-emotional-safety

34 It may not be rocket science, but it sure is neuroscience: Happy learners are healthy learners. While this may seem like (ahem) a no- brainer, there is a good amount of neurological evidence to promote the idea that if students do not feel comfortable in a classroom setting, they will not learn. From Edutopia, based-learning-emotional-safetyhttp://www.edutopia.org/neuroscience-brain- based-learning-emotional-safety

35 Make the classroom stress free. Lighten the mood by making jokes and spurring curiosity; create a welcoming and consistent environment through daily rituals, songs, or games; give students frequent opportunities to ask questions and engage in discussions without judgment; and determine achievable challenges for each learner. From Edutopia, based-learning-emotional-safetyhttp://www.edutopia.org/neuroscience-brain- based-learning-emotional-safety

36 Encourage participation, not perfection. A classroom in which mistakes are encouraged is a positive learning environment, both neurologically and socially speaking. From Edutopia, based-learning-emotional-safetyhttp://www.edutopia.org/neuroscience-brain- based-learning-emotional-safety

37 Practice active listening. "Focus on what students are trying to say," writes Willis. This kind of positive reinforcement from the get-go allows students to let their guard down (known in neuro-speak as calming their "affective filters"). Listening to students in general, and listening to their intentions in particular, can help relax anxious brains. From Edutopia, based-learning-emotional-safetyhttp://www.edutopia.org/neuroscience-brain- based-learning-emotional-safety

38 Making Math activities Sticky Use math to help children make sense of their world Incorporate instructional themes into math lessons Plan lessons that build concepts, methods, and language Use small group settings

39 Math Number knowledge Geometry and spatial reasoning Measurement and comparisons Patterns Graphing

40 Centers Fine Motor Library Construction Computer Games and Puzzles Computer Dramatic Play

41 Why Play? Play provides opportunities for skill development in the areas of social, emotional, cognitive, language and physical development Play allows for children to set their own goals and carry out activities to accomplish those goals Play allows for children to construct meaning and understanding by interacting with other children and materials without the pressure of meeting adult expectations

42 Types of Play Solitary/sensory – using the senses to explore objects in the same way in a repetitive fashion Parallel/functional – manipulating objects in a functional manner Associative/constructive – symbolic organization of materials to sort and build objects Cooperative/pretend – object purpose is adjusted and used with a different intent (Sadao & Robinson, 2010)

43 Techniques for Eliciting Language During Play Model play schemes Describe the action Let the child lead Follow the child’s lead Expand the language (Pepper & Weitzman, 2004)

44 Preparing for Play Set up the environment in a way that invites participation Provide experiences that will teach new schemes for play Provide visual prompts for play schemes Make time to be a player (Barbour & Desjean-Perrotta, 2002)

45 Dismissal Review Dismissal routines Dismissal rituals

46 References Barbour, A., & Desjean-Perrotta, B. (2002). Prop box play; 50 themes to inspire dramatic play. Beltsville: Gryphon House, Inc. Pepper, J., & Weitzman, E. (2004). It takes two to talk: A practical guide for parents of children with language delay. Toronto: The Hanen Center. Sadao, K. S., & Robinson, N. B. (2010). Assistive technology for young children: Creating inclusive learning environments. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. learning-neuroplasticityhttp://www.edutopia.org/neuroscience-brain-based- learning-neuroplasticity - Sarah Bernard enchances-learning-neuroplasticity/


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