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Increasing Student Success: A Journey of Course Redesign Presented to Course Redesign Workshop The Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa Tucson, AZ October 27,

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Presentation on theme: "Increasing Student Success: A Journey of Course Redesign Presented to Course Redesign Workshop The Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa Tucson, AZ October 27,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Increasing Student Success: A Journey of Course Redesign Presented to Course Redesign Workshop The Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa Tucson, AZ October 27, 2007

2 Andreana M. Grimaldo Assistant Professor of Mathematics Developmental Mathematics Coach Quinsigamond Community College Worcester, MA

3 Quinsigamond Community College Profile  Established in 1963  One of the 29 colleges and universities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ system of public higher education  Open Admissions  Located in the city of Worcester (176,000 pop.)  Offers 60 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit options to over 6,600 day and evening students.  Diverse student population  Ethnicity  Age  Socio-economic

4 QCC Math Department Faculty  10 full time faculty  adjunct faculty  ~180 sections of mathematics per semester  ~100 sections of developmental math per semester  80% taught by adjunct faculty

5 Course Times and Locations  Day class (traditional, computers)  Night class (traditional, computers)  Weekend (traditional, computers)  Off campus (local high schools, hospitals, nursing homes, correctional facilities, etc.)  Fast track  Online

6 QCC Student Profile Average age: 27 50% Traditional Age (18-22 years old) 46% Adult learners 4% Under 18 years of age 47% Full-time; 53% Part-time 24% Minority 60% Female 60% Day; 40% evening 97% from Worcester County 40% from Worcester

7 QCC Math Student Profile  85% test (CPT) into at least 1 level of developmental math  High level of math anxiety  Long history of failure  Poor math and study skills  Overall - unprepared for college level work

8 Course Redesign History  1999 Commonwealth of Massachusetts Community College Developmental Education Committee began the campus thinking of change  2001 – 2002 Numbers in Developmental Math began increasing  2001 QCC awarded $1.7 million, 5 year Title III grant

9 Challenges  Large number of developmental math sections  Large number of part-time faculty  Increasingly poor performance of students  Inconsistent grading  Inconsistent delivery of objectives  Students with Individual Education Plans  Strong union presence protecting Academic Freedom

10 QCC’s Developmental Math Program  Basic Mathematics  Beginning Algebra  Intermediate Algebra

11 QCC Developmental Math Instructor Resource Manual  Departmental textbook selection  Text specific manual  Faculty created, piloted, edited  Available in hard copy / electronic version  Syllabus, semester outline, pacing, group activities, homework, assessments, etc.  Student centered instructional methods  UDL-Universal Design of Learning

12 Departmental Final Exam  Institutional “pre-requisite” to next level course  Face-to-face  30-question, multiple choice  Use TestGen to generate multiple versions of pencil/paper exam  Passing score: 73% on final exam  “Test the Test” – approx. 88% pass/fail agreement rate

13 Technology Requirement  Fall 2007  Course Descriptions contain: “Technology tools will be utilized”.  All textbooks have an access code for online homework.

14 Developmental Math Coach  Faculty position focused on developmental math curriculum  Supported by administration with re-assigned time  Plan and implement professional development  Empower adjuncts and full-time faculty  MyMathLab technology support  Reflective practice sessions  “Clearinghouse” for information  Create, distribute and monitor final exams

15 Intermediate Algebra  Pilot 2002  Baseline Pass Rate 54.5%  75-80% Traditional classrooms  Uniform content and pacing  Required homework – computer based  Mandatory departmental final exam, face-to-face, paper/pencil

16 Beginning Algebra  Pilot 2003  Baseline Pass Rate 48.1%  50% computer classrooms  Uniform content and pacing  Required homework – computer based  Accelerated pace is possible  Mandatory departmental final exam, face- to-face, paper/pencil

17 Basic Mathematics  Largest span of ability  Pilot 2004  Baseline Pass Rate 54.5%  Flexibly structured  Self-guided work (computer based or hard copy)  Mandatory departmental final exam, face-to-face, paper/pencil

18 Pilot the Proposed Redesigned Courses ( )  Pass Rate: Based on final exam grade of 73+  Intermediate Algebra: 58.9%  Beginning Algebra: 74.2%  Basic Math: 51%

19 MyMathLab  One of the first in New England to use (~2000)  Inconsistent application ( )  MyMathLab upgraded (2005)  Fully embraced (2006)

20 Electronic Homework Management Using MyMathLab 3 Master Courses- All faculty copy

21 Retention Strategies Close tracking of student’s attendance and performance

22 Early Intervention

23 Student Support Math Learning Center  56-seat learning center staffed by trained math tutors  Computer or pencil/paper assistance  Possible requirement Harrington Learning Center  60-seat computer lab  All computers loaded with MyMathLab  No math tutors

24 Faculty Support  Center for Academic Excellence  Curriculum Workshops  Technology Training  Reflective Practice Sessions

25 Institutionally Accepted  ALL courses use QCC’s Instructor Resource Manual  ALL courses follow the same format  ALL courses use technology  ALL students access MyMathLab  ALL students take final exam

26 Results

27 Intermediate Algebra

28 Beginning Algebra

29 Basic Mathematics

30 What Is Happening In College Algebra?

31 College Algebra Results

32 Overall Conclusions  Large number of developmental math sections  Large number of part-time faculty  Student performance has increased  Student completion rate has increased  Institutional expansion - consistency of curriculum  Increased enrollment per section – able to manage  Higher level of faculty collaboration and camaraderie

33 Major Components to Success  Administrative support  Faculty designed and implemented  Individual instructors benefit by change  Atmosphere of professional collaboration

34 Future Plans  Computerized departmental final exam  Continued atmosphere of collaboration and experimentation  Institutional laptop program  NEVER DONE!

35 Team Members  Creation of Instructor Resource Manuals –QCC Faculty -Andreana M. Grimaldo, Denise Robichaud, Steve Zona, Virginia Asadoorian, Carol Rinaldi, Elaine Previte  All Title III Data Analysis –Neena Verma, IR Director at QCC –Meredith Twombly, former IR Director at QCC  Pat Toney, Vice President of Academic Affairs Barbara Zabka, Staff Assistant, Academic Affairs

36 Questions


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