Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Teacher Education in CALL The Seven Central Questions Phil Hubbard – Stanford University, USA 2006 International Symposium of CALL FLTRP International.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Teacher Education in CALL The Seven Central Questions Phil Hubbard – Stanford University, USA 2006 International Symposium of CALL FLTRP International."— Presentation transcript:

1 Teacher Education in CALL The Seven Central Questions Phil Hubbard – Stanford University, USA 2006 International Symposium of CALL FLTRP International Convention Centre Beijing

2 Hubbard - CALL Education2 Overview 1)Teacher education for CALL: why now? 2)7 central questions 3)Framework for CALL education objectives 4)Approaches and options for CALL education

3 Hubbard - CALL Education3 Overview 1)Teacher education for CALL: why now? 2)7 central questions 3)Framework for CALL education objectives 4)Approaches and options for CALL education

4 Hubbard - CALL Education4 Why now? 1)Enhancement of job prospects 2)Student/program expectations 3)Professional necessity 4)Evidence of teacher transformation 5)Professional initiatives a)Standards (e.g. ISTE; TESOL) b)Certification (e.g. TESOL Online Teaching)

5 Hubbard - CALL Education5 Overview 1)Teacher education for CALL: why now? 2)7 central questions 3)Framework for CALL education objectives 4)Approaches and options for CALL education

6 Hubbard - CALL Education6 7 Central Questions Q1: What should CALL teacher education include? Technical training Pedagogical training Foundation for lifelong learning

7 Hubbard - CALL Education7 7 Central Questions Q2: How should the teachers be taught? So they can remember So they can apply what they have learned So that they are encouraged to learn more

8 Hubbard - CALL Education8 7 Central Questions Q3: When should teachers be taught CALL? Pre-service –At end of program –At beginning of program –Throughout program In-service –When a need or project is identified –When appropriate infrastructure is in place

9 Hubbard - CALL Education9 7 Central Questions Q4: Where should they be taught it? Pre-service –In the context they will use it –In a range of settings In-service –Onsite if possible –Offsite if necessary –Online if appropriate

10 Hubbard - CALL Education10 7 Central Questions Q5: Who should teach it to them? Peers Computer specialists Computer education specialists CALL education specialists

11 Hubbard - CALL Education11 7 Central Questions Q6: How will we assess knowledge? Course completion Standards Certification (TESOL CALL online) Formal testing for technical skill/knowledge Portfolios for pedagogical skill/knowledge

12 Hubbard - CALL Education12 Break…

13 Hubbard - CALL Education13 7 Central Questions Q7: What are the obstacles? Inertia Insufficient time Insufficient facilities Lack of experienced, knowledgeable trainers

14 Hubbard - CALL Education14 7 Central Questions Q7: What are the obstacles? (more of them) Perception of CALL as “fringe” Absence of strong models Absence of administrative will

15 Hubbard - CALL Education15 Overview 1)Teacher education for CALL: why now? 2)7 central questions 3)Framework for CALL education objectives 4)Approaches and options for CALL education

16 Hubbard - CALL Education16 Role-based framework “The Scope of CALL Education” Objective Structure –Functional & institutional roles –Knowledge & skills –Technical & pedagogical areas

17 Hubbard - CALL Education17 Why roles? Inspired by role theory (social psychology) Expectations –Of knowledge –Of skills Note: role for us is a pre-theoretical, practical concept

18 Hubbard - CALL Education18 Functional Roles Practitioners – apply knowledge/skill directly Developers – create something new or revise/adapt Researchers – discover information or pursue evaluation Trainers –build knowledge or skill in others

19 Hubbard - CALL Education19 Institutional Roles Pre-service teacher In-service teacher CALL specialist: deep knowledge and an elaborated skill set in one area… –across technical and pedagogical domains: expert –in one domain (limited in the other): adjunct CALL professional: knowledge across CALL

20 Hubbard - CALL Education20 Role-based framework PractitionerDeveloperResearcherTrainer Classroom teachers (pre-service) Classroom teachers (in-service) CALL specialists (expert/adjunct) CALL professionals (expert/adjunct)

21 Hubbard - CALL Education21 Role-based framework PractitionerDeveloperResearcherTrainer Classroom teachers (pre-service)XXXX Classroom teachers (in-service)XXXX CALL specialists (expert/adjunct)XXXX CALL professionals (expert/adjunct)XXXX

22 Hubbard - CALL Education22 Expansion of “X” Practitioner Classroom teachers (pre-service) Technical – Knowledge (shallow) – Skills (limited) Pedagogical – Knowledge (shallow) – Skills (limited) Note: shallow/limited are relative to CALL specialists

23 Hubbard - CALL Education23 Knowledge vs. skill From “Can do list” for browserswww.ict4lt.org Indicate what you can do: (=Skills) –Save a graphic or picture from a Web page Essential things that I understand: (=Knowledge) –How frame-based websites work

24 Hubbard - CALL Education24 Example Consider an in-service classroom teacher preparing a group project … The institutional role is “classroom teacher” What are the functional roles the teacher plays? What technological and pedagogical skills and knowledge underpin them?

25 Hubbard - CALL Education25 Example 1)As a developer – create the task or modify an existing one 2)As a practitioner – integrate into course, present to students, organize groups, set expectations, manage progress, handle problems, provide feedback on product

26 Hubbard - CALL Education26 Example 3)As a trainer – provide any needed technical training; provide training on effective group dynamics and strategies for linking actions to learning objectives 4)As a researcher – review postings on discussion board, analyzing grammar, lexis, and interactional patterns to inform subsequent activities or future revisionss

27 Hubbard - CALL Education27 Summary: role-based approach… 1)links to expectations and integrates functional & institutional perspectives; 2)is a descriptive tool for prescriptive constructs 3)allows comparisons of alternatives; 4)can inform initiatives in: - course & program curricula - standards & certification

28 Hubbard - CALL Education28 Overview 1)Teacher education for CALL: why now? 2)7 central questions 3)Framework for CALL education objectives 4)Approaches and options for CALL education

29 Hubbard - CALL Education29 How do we teach: Organization Base first (technical) Depth first (technical/pedagogical) Breadth first (pedagogical)

30 Hubbard - CALL Education30 How do we teach: Process Through tasks and projects Through situated learning Through reflective learning Through inquiry/discovery –Support self-directed learning –Introduce professional Communities of Practice

31 Hubbard - CALL Education31 Closing Remarks CALL teacher education is moving from luxury to necessity We can all promote CALL education, seeking answers to the 7 central questions –as teachers –as administrators –as CALL specialists –as CALL professionals


Download ppt "Teacher Education in CALL The Seven Central Questions Phil Hubbard – Stanford University, USA 2006 International Symposium of CALL FLTRP International."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google