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Enrollment Development Provide a systematic assessment of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; through analysis of aggregate.

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Presentation on theme: "Enrollment Development Provide a systematic assessment of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; through analysis of aggregate."— Presentation transcript:

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9 Enrollment Development Provide a systematic assessment of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; through analysis of aggregate data including customer feedback.

10 Optimize Enrollment Headcount & FTE Underrepresented groups Close gap between application and enrolled Reduce wait time to enter limited enrollment programs Retain more students

11 Enrollment Development Community College Survey of Students given in winter quarter to more than 600 students that examined student engagement, learning and retention. Results will arrive this summer and will be compared against students taking CCSSE in spring 2006.

12 Enrollment Development Develop a coordinating and unifying effort among the campus community and region to promote college enrollment via marketing and recruiting strategies for Early College a) Dual Enrollment/Dual Credit; b) Seniors to Sophomores; c) Post Secondary Enrollment Option d) College NOW

13 Enrollment Development Example: After serving approximately 250 dual credit students this year, local districts have requested more than 800 college seats for next year – more than it can accommodate through state grant funds. Of 27 dual credit students responding thus far to an online survey, 70% said their dual credit experience made them more likely to apply to college after graduation.

14 Enrollment Development Increase community/regional awareness of NC State Online Education and Transfer with the Associate of Arts/Associate of Science degrees

15 Critical Path timeline ODL dept. restructured President’s Announcement President’s Announcement CAO assigns work teams CAO assigns work teams LMS Decision LMS Decision Policies redacted Policies redacted Work team Orientation Work team Orientation LMS team created LMS team created LMS admin & ODL training Online transition new LMS Online transition new LMS Web enhanced transition new LMS Web enhanced transition new LMS Online adjunct pool recruitment OLN Online adjunct pool recruitment OLN Online adjunct pool trained Online adjunct pool trained New SMS implemented New SMS implemented Project review Project review Outcomes published Outcomes published Project completion Project completion

16 Critical Path timeline ODL dept. restructured President’s Announcement President’s Announcement CAO assigns work teams CAO assigns work teams LMS Decision LMS Decision Policies redacted Policies redacted Work team Orientation Work team Orientation LMS team created LMS team created LMS admin & ODL training Online transition new LMS Online transition new LMS Web enhanced transition new LMS Web enhanced transition new LMS Online adjunct pool recruitment OLN Online adjunct pool recruitment OLN Online adjunct pool trained Online adjunct pool trained New SMS implemented New SMS implemented Project review Project review Outcomes published Outcomes published Project completion Project completion

17 Duplicated enrollment in distance classes from Summer Summer 2007

18 Number of online class sections offered between Summer Summer 2007

19 Enrollment Development Broaden integrated enrollment development to be targeted, dialogue-dependent, technology oriented, and results accountable

20 Enrollment Development FY 08 enrollment target projected at 6.0% increase. FY07 credit hour total = 87,970 FY08 credit hour total = 90,997 Actual FY08 enrollment = 3.4% increase FY 09 enrollment target projected at 3.5%. FY 09 credit hour target = 94,182

21 Build effective relationships with prospective and currently enrolled students to influence college choice and persistence By creating and offering “universal” scholarships

22 Build effective relationships with prospective and currently enrolled students to influence college choice and persistence Supporting and engaging SPARC Succeed & Prosper through education (P-16) Ashland, Richland and Crawford. P-16 (pre- kindergarten through grade 16)

23 Build effective relationships with prospective and currently enrolled students to influence college choice and persistence Supporting and engaging SPARC Improve the flow of regional high school graduates into college or advanced workforce training. SPARC has set a bold goal: 85% of all high school graduates will go on to attain a postsecondary credential by age 22 within ten years or show progress.

24 Build effective relationships with prospective and currently enrolled students to influence college choice and persistence Supporting and engaging SPARC Reduce the number of kindergarten students with weak pre-reading skills by 75%, and increase those displaying advanced skills by 25%. To effectively manage the initiative, strategy implementation in this area has been deferred until 2009.

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26 Workforce Development and Enhancing Healthcare Regional Innovation Grant (RIG) will be providing key indicators as to the direction Economic Development region six and the college must take to provide the educational opportunities to meet the demand for a highly skilled workforce in health and manufacturing. During a recent site visit, a a federal RIG program officer was highly impressed with our progress.

27 Regional manufacturing is projected to remain above state and national levels, not including the thousands of replacement jobs from retirements.

28 Regional health care jobs (not including replacements, are projected to grow by 10% in the next five years)

29 The initial pilot grant for advanced manufactured was structured to meet the needs of all nine counties within Region 6. Residents from each county participated as evidenced by the following chart.

30 The pilot project served 3,020 participants, including 768 in Integrated Systems Technology, 524 in Die Technology, 1,043 for customized training in various aspects and 685 youth assessments to provide improved career direction. This amounted to 1,705 unique individuals, since some participants took multiple areas of training. Of adult workers trained, 142 were unemployed.

31 Considering that more than 1,000 unique adult workers received training, this means the project impacted nearly 2% of the regional workforce in manufacturing. Moreover, it is important to note this was not a welfare project just for large employers given the fact that 328 companies participated. For example, though GM’s local stamping plant was a catalyst for creating this project, only 31% of Die Technology students were from GM.

32 The classes were offered in a variety of modules realized that training needs varied among workers. For example, IST modules range from 11 to 70 hours, depending on the level of complexity. Of the 768 students attempting at least one module, 558 (73 %) completed their coursework. Die Technology courses were offered in four modules of 80 contact hours each. Of the 524 students attempting at least one module, 449 (86%) completed their coursework. Key career outcomes for adult participants included: 58 unemployed participants gained employment with an average wage of $9.52 per hour. (33% sampled). 363 employed participants had an average wage increase of $.67 per hour (33% sampled), or $1, per year.

33 Workforce Development and Enhancing Healthcare The high demand for a highly skilled workforce will require innovative approaches to the educational processes. These approaches will be needed to work within the structure of the Ohio Skills Bank initiative. This will result in four career pathways funded for training.

34 Below is an example in health from Lakeland Community College:

35 Workforce Development and Enhancing Healthcare Health care programs have revised procedural processes and added programs to allow for increased admission and retention of students. A continuing study of adding more opportunities for clinical experiences is needed.

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37 Achieving the Dream NC State Achieving the Dream priorities are: improving student success in developmental courses and improving student success in gateway (AKA gatekeeper) courses

38 Achieving the Dream To support our chosen priorities, our current Achieving the Dream work has two strands. All action steps in our work plan tie to either 1) Improving curriculum and instruction or 2) strengthening the college advising system.

39 Achieving the Dream A critical area of focus for FY09 will be developmental mathematics. Mainly due to turnovers in key personnel (Cyders, Rountree, Pat Kent) this is an area where our work needs to gain traction.

40 Achieving the Dream Key Point #4: Performance indicators and measures have been established so that we can measure the outcomes of our Achieving the Dream work.

41 Major AtD Accomplishments AtD continues to bring a needed focus on developmental education that historically hasn’t always existed at NC State, despite the fact that most students take developmental courses. It has created new synergy amongst faculty and advising staff to get students to that college-level goal, and continues to spark a variety of new ideas to meet this goal. Nelson-Denny post-levels for developmental reading have tremendously increased as have longitudinal success rates.

42 Major AtD Accomplishments Another very noticeable change is the energy and focus it has created amongst gatekeeper English (ENG 101) faculty. ENG 101 is the only course that every NC State student must take to graduate. Consequently, it plugs right into the AtD philosophy of institution-wide change. The English department was extremely engaged during the gatekeeper data collection phase in Spring 2007, and based on this data crafted major strategies such as mandatory tutoring (for both students and faculty) and reduced class sizes. When looking at 6-quarter outcomes, it appears still too early to detect the impact of these strategies but in one short-term view, pass rates for cohort students taking the course in Fall 2007 were 71%, significantly higher than prior Fall quarters.

43 Major AtD Needs A major short-term need entails refining math strategies at both the developmental and gatekeeper levels. Since increasing the math cut-scores and implementing mandatory placement, the number of developmental sections has mushroomed and the math faculty has done its best to keep up. However, numerous math strategies have stalled as discussed earlier in this narrative, and the college is further raising the stakes next year when it will require all students, regardless of major, to test out of or pass at minimum the highest developmental math level.

44 Major AtD Needs Another major disappointment has been the lagging performance of African American students despite being selected as a demographic group in need of strategic intervention. Generally the age (23-29) and sex (male) groups have improved in developmental and gatekeeper English according to the six-quarter outcomes. While outcomes in developmental reading and writing did slightly improve for African Americans, only three of 30 cohort students from 2006 had completed gatekeeper English within six quarters.

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46 Core Learning Outcomes: Competencies needed-NC State graduate Communication Computation Computer Literacy Critical Thinking Culture and Community Competency in Profession Documented on our Student Success Plan

47 Progress Report for 07-08: Culture & Community Pilot Computer Literacy Pilot Computation – Math 103 standard Biennial Schedule and Assessment Day Proposal (http://www.ncstatecollege.edu/committees/assessment/default.htm) Core Learning Outcomes-Syllabus Project Graduate Survey

48 Core Learning Outcomes Example: Measuring critical thinking through ACT standardized College Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) test sampling approximately 100 outgoing students. For the second straight year, NC State met the two-year college national average of 61. Note the CAAP score range is The following chart compares the results of specific programs for both years. Keep in mind differences in sample size and makeup for certain categories, such as Community Services, when interpreting the results. The Assessment Committee is breaking out the results of individual programs and sharing them with chairs/deans.

49 Core Learning Outcomes College Assessment of Academic Proficiency

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51 College Foundation Resource Development for 2009 Capital Campaign

52 Student Support Grants for necessities and scholarships for entrepreneurs

53 Innovation Grants for creative, meaningful faculty and staff projects

54 Innovation Grants for creative, meaningful faculty and staff projects Grants obtained from Milliron, area banks, to fund electric truck conversion project and a summer “ train the trainer ” workshop on doing electric car conversion for community college and career center teachers

55 Innovation Creation of Entrepreneur Center with director, course curriculum

56 Facilities Kehoe project completion Fallerius entrance renovation

57 Looking Ahead

58 New Program Ideas (Computer Engineering, mechatronics, advanced catering, entrepreneurship, occupational therapy, health services, etc.) Development of Potential Performance Measures Strategic Plan for Higher Education Ohio Skills Bank Community College Partnership Initiatives (Northwest State, Central Ohio Technical College, Marion Technical College) Training Provider Partnerships (One-Stop, Adult Education, ABLE)

59 Looking Ahead Coordination of Workforce Assessment Programs (WorkKeys, SkillsMax) Campus Policeman (Campus Security Measures) Professional Growth for Faculty regarding campus security measures OSU Campus Student Life Center Capital Bill Community Projects (Fallerius, Kehoe) Expanded Development of Outreach Center Classes (Associate of Arts Degree) Expansion of the University Center Dual Enrollment /Dual Credit Program Expansion Seniors to Sophomores Initiative (OSU collaborative) Lease space for Governor’s Region 6 Office in Kehoe

60 Looking Ahead SPARC P16 (employment of director) Expansion of high school partnerships (development of practices and procedures manual for early college programming, expansion of summer institutes) Expansion of Ohio State University Mansfield partnership (promote transfer of students and increased emphasis on regional baccalaureate degrees) Minority Faculty Recruitment (work with community families to “grow our own”. Transfer courses and AA transferability

61 Looking Ahead Increased emphasis on professional development (valuing people-adjunct professors) Current Capital Projects (Health Sciences-June ’08, Fallerius-June ’08, Main Campus Paving-July ’08, Kehoe paving and HVAC controls- August ’08) Expansion of Counseling and Support Services Maximize use of industrial credentialing and stackable certifications Working with Owner Ralph Phillips for collaborative development of industrial park surrounding the Kehoe Center. Vice President for Learning (development of Council of Deans)

62 Budget Proposed: May 28, 2008

63 Board of Trustees’ Planning Goals Maximize Student Access Guarantee Quality Education Guide Towards Educational Success Workforce Development Resource Development Community Resource Community Input

64 Strategic Initiatives Enrollment Management Achieving the Dream Workforce/Economic Development Core Learning Outcomes Health Care Education

65 FY ’09 Budget Planning Assumptions State Appropriations Remain at Biennium Budget Allocation. Tuition Freeze Remains in Effect Enrollment increase of 3.5% for Fill All Current Vacant Positions. Consider Planning Advisory Committee’s Recommendation.

66 State Appropriation as a Percent of Total Budget Total Budget OBR State Share of Instruction & Access Challenge % of Total Budget FY ‘0819,476,438$7,851,18040% FY ’0719,512,3697,435,61538% FY ’0619,641,9717,503,68238% FY ’0518,091,500 7,668,17842% FY ’0416,744,4117,018,03842% FY ’03 16,316,545 6,856,64942% FY ’0214,465,0477,071,48549% FY ’0114,967,2277,549,84551% FY ’0014,147,2987,252,80452%

67 North Central State College Enrollment Data Fall Quarter

68 Analysis of Net Assets Adoption of Governmental Accounting Standards Board No. 34/35 02/03 Actual 03/04 Actual 04/05 Actual 05/06 Actual 06/07 Actual Total Revenue$20,891,029$20,988,039$20,778,856$21,182,291$21,385,368 Total Expenditures 18,971,818 19,770,03920,494,70521,363,081$21,552,777 Increase (Decrease) 1,919,2111,218,000284,151(180,800)($167,409) Net Assets19,989,19821,207,19821,491,34921,310,549$21,143,140 Unrestricted Net Assets2,097,9472,883,2473,545,3733,911,411$3,917,243 Unrestricted Percent of Expenditures11.06%14.59%17.30%18.31%18.18% Planned Appropriation600,000440,0001,537,136841,186$1,127,922

69 FY '08 Unrestricted Increase (Decrease)$670,474* FY '08 Plant Fund (Capital) Increase (Decrease)156,984 Increase (Decrease) in Net Assets$827,458 Unrestricted Net Assets Beginning of Year3,917,243 Unrestricted Net Assets End of Year4,744,701 Estimated 12% Reserve (Operating Budget)2,469,795 Estimated Available Fund Balance$2,274,906 Estimated Fund Balance Calculation *Projected based on average deficit of final 2 months of fiscal year over last 5 years.

70 Budget Overview

71 Budget Planning Recommendations Wage increase of 3.0% with a $1,250 1 guarantee. Implement a $1 per hour adjunct wage increase. Fund recommended PAC initiatives. –Initiative Assessment Development –Adjunct Faculty Professional Development –Core Learning Outcomes Assessments –Distance Learning Expand Full-Time Positions –English Faculty –Behavioral Science Faculty –OTA Faculty/Program Director –CDC Child Care Specialist –Foundation Database Specialist Use fund balance to cover projected deficit. 1 Prorated for other than full-time.

72 Revenue by Source FY ’08 AMENDED FY’09 PROJECTEDDIFFERENCE State Share of Instruction $6,920,002$7,448,422528,420 Access Challenge 785,656778,666(6,990) Jobs Challenge 145,522142,807(2,715) Student Tuition and Fees 8,634,3589,013,386379,028 Non-Credit Nursing 14,63820,3305,692 Other Revenues 516,000519,3143,314 University Center 70,83336,000(34,833) Capital Debt Service 166,000159,000(7,000) Child Development Center 545,507607,90662,399 Workforce and Community Development 500,000388,675(111,325) Facilities 50,00069,00019,000 Fund Balance 1,127,9221,398,116270,194 Total $19,476,438$20,581,6221,105,184

73 Expenditure by Type FY BudgetFY Budget$ Change Payroll$8,607,549$9,074,284$466,735 Benefits3,228,7643,556,491327,727 Printing106,471106, Advertising165,768 0 Postage104,155109,1555,000 Shared Campus Expense1,560,8691,648,48287,613 Professional Development212,005202,293(9,712) Grants and Scholarships347,000344,000(3,000) Equipment Lease & Rental194,741 0 New Equipment350,699317,139(33,560) Professional Fees255,026243,087(11,939) Debt Service53,405 0 All Other Expenses1,483,4721,613,316129,844 Child Development Center649,479753,003103,524 Corporate734,177692,415(41,762) Facilities1,422,8581,507,17284,314 Total Budget$19,476,438$20,581,622$1,105,184

74 Questions


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