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THIS TIME IT’S FOR REAL. LET’S REVIEW AND ENJOY Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so; For those.

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Presentation on theme: "THIS TIME IT’S FOR REAL. LET’S REVIEW AND ENJOY Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so; For those."— Presentation transcript:

1 THIS TIME IT’S FOR REAL

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3 LET’S REVIEW AND ENJOY Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so; For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow, Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me. From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be, Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow, And soonest our best men with thee do go, Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery. Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell; And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then? One short sleep past, we wake eternally, And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

4 WHAT IS THE POEM ABOUT? WHAT IS THE AUTHOR TRYING TO SAY? HOW DOES HE SAY IT?

5 TPCASTTTPCASTT THISPOEMTHISPOEM PASSERS-BY PASSERS-BY, Out of your many faces Flash memories to me Now at the day end Away from the sidewalks Where your shoe soles traveled And your voices rose and blend To form the city's afternoon roar Hindering an old silence. Passers-by, I remember lean ones among you, Throats in the clutch of a hope, Lips written over with strivings, Mouths that kiss only for love. Records of great wishes slept with, Held long And prayed and toiled for.. Yes, Written on Your mouths And your throats I read them When you passed by.

6 Spring is like a perhaps hand (which comes carefully out of Nowhere)arranging a window,into which people look(while people stare arranging and changing placing carefully there a strange thing and a known thing here)and changing everything carefully spring is like a perhaps Hand in a window (carefully to and from moving New and Old things,while people stare carefully moving a perhaps fraction of flower here placing an inch of air there)and without breaking anything. ANSWER THE FOLLOWING IN ONE PARAGRAPH: WHAT DOES THIS POEM MAKE YOU SEE AND FEEL?

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8 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. IN “THE MAN HE KILLED,” -WHY DOES THE SPEAKER REPEAT HIS “CLEAR REASON”? -HOW DOES THIS POEM MEET THE CRITERIA “THE EXPRESSION OF ELEVATED THOUGHT IN ELEVATED LANGUAGE.”? ANSWER BOTH QUESTIONS ON A SHEET OF PAPER-10 MINUTES

9 PARAPHRASING A POEM IS THE FIRST STEP! PARAPHRASE “A STUDY OF READING HABITS”

10 THE SPEAKER DOES NOT EQUAL THE POET YOU MUST ANSWER THE THIRD QUESTION: WHAT IS THE CENTRAL PURPOSE OF THE POEM? ALL YOUR ANSWERS NEED TO TIE BACK TO THIS QUESTION---THE SO WHAT!

11 1. PARAPHRASE THE POEM 2. WHO IS THE SPEAKER? 3. WHAT IS THE OCCASION 4. WHAT IS THE CENTRAL PURPOSE? SYLVIA PLATH I am silver and exact. I have no preconceptions. Whatever I see I swallow immediately Just as it is, unmisted by love or dislike. I am not cruel, only truthful- The eye of the little god, four cornered. Most of the time I meditate on the opposite wall. It is pink, with speckles. I have looked at it so long I think it is a part of my heart. But it f;lickers. Faces and darkness separate us over and over. Now I am a lake. A woman bends over me, Searching my reaches for what she really is. Then she turns to those liars, the candles or the moon. I see her back, and reflect it faithfully. She rewards me with tears and an agitation of hands. I am important to her. She comes and goes. Each morning it is her face that replaces the darkness. In me she has drowned a young girl, and in me an old woman Rises toward her day after day, like a terrible fish.

12 1. PARAPHRASE THE POEM 2. WHO IS THE SPEAKER? 3. WHAT IS THE OCCASION 4. WHAT IS THE CENTRAL PURPOSE? ADRIENNE RICH PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 684

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14 "Mother dear, may I go downtown Instead of out to play, And march the streets of Birmingham In a Freedom March today?" "No, baby, no, you may not go, For the dogs are fierce and wild, And clubs and hoses, guns and jails Aren't good for a little child." "But, mother, I won't be alone. Other children will go with me, And march the streets of Birmingham To make our country free." "No, baby, no, you may not go, For I fear those guns will fire. But you may go to church instead And sing in the children's choir." She has combed and brushed her night-dark hair, And bathed rose petal sweet, And drawn white gloves on her small brown hands, And white shoes on her feet. The mother smiled to know that her child Was in the sacred place, But that smile was the last smile To come upon her face. For when she heard the explosion, Her eyes grew wet and wild. She raced through the streets of Birmingham Calling for her child. She clawed through bits of glass and brick, Then lifted out a shoe. "O, here's the shoe my baby wore, But, baby, where are you?" Ballad of Birmingham (On the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963)

15 BE PREPARED TO ANSWER ANY AND ALL QUESTIONS.

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17 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. 1. WHAT IS DENOTATION? 2. WHAT IS CONNOTATION? 3. WHAT TYPES OF WORDS DO POETS SEEK? PLEASE ANSWER ON A HALF SHEET OF PAPER

18 1. WHAT IS DENOTATION? THE DICTIONARY MEANING 2. WHAT IS CONNOTATION? WHAT IS SUGGESTS BEYOND WHAT IT EXPRESSES 3. WHAT TYPES OF WORDS DO POETS SEEK? MEANINGFUL WORDS

19 HENRY REED 1.WHICH WORD IN STANZA 1 IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE? 2. WHY IS “ELOQUENT GESTURES” AN EFFECTIVE PHRASE? 3. HOW ARE THE BEES “ASSAULTING AND FUMBLING”? WHY IS THAT PHRASE EFFECTIVE FOR THE POEM? PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 692

20 1.WHAT PHRASES CONVEY THEIR MEANING THE BEST? LANGSTON HUGHES 2. HOW DO BLACK AND WHITE CONVEY DIFFERENT CONNOTATIONS THROUGHOUT THE POEM? 3. HOW DO THOSE DIFFERENT CONNOTATIONS AFFECT THE AUTHOR’S PURPOSE? My old man's a white old man And my old mother's black. If ever I cursed my white old man I take my curses back. If ever I cursed my black old mother And wished she were in hell, I'm sorry for that evil wish And now I wish her well My old man died in a fine big house. My ma died in a shack. I wonder were I'm going to die, Being neither white nor black?

21 TERENCE, this is stupid stuff: You eat your victuals fast enough; There can’t be much amiss, ’tis clear, To see the rate you drink your beer. But oh, good Lord, the verse you make, 5 It gives a chap the belly-ache. The cow, the old cow, she is dead; It sleeps well, the horned head: We poor lads, ’tis our turn now. To hear such tunes as killed the cow! Pretty friendship 'tis to rhyme Your friends to death before their time Moping melancholy mad! Come, pipe a tune to dance to, lad!" Why, if 'tis dancing you would be, There's brisker pipes than poetry. Say, for what were hop-yards meant, Or why was Burton built on Trent? Oh many a peer of England brews Livelier liquor than the Muse, And malt does more than Milton can To justify God's ways to man. Ale, man, ale's the stuff to drink For fellows whom it hurts to think: Look into the pewter pot To see the world as the world's not. And faith, 'tis pleasant till 'tis past: The mischief is that 'twill not last. Oh I have been to Ludlow fair And left my necktie God knows where, And carried half way home, or near, Pints and quarts of Ludlow beer: Then the world seemed none so bad, And I myself a sterling lad; And down in lovely muck I've lain, Happy till I woke again. Then I saw the morning sky: Heigho, the tale was all a lie; The world, it was the old world yet, I was I, my things were wet, And nothing now remained to do But begin the game anew.

22 Therefore, since the world has still Much good, but much less good than ill, And while the sun and moon endure Luck's a chance, but trouble's sure, I'd face it as a wise man would, And train for ill and not for good. 'Tis true, the stuff I bring for sale Is not so brisk a brew as ale: Out of a stem that scored the hand I wrung it in a weary land. But take it: if the smack is sour, The better for the embittered hour; It should do good to heart and head When your soul is in my soul's stead; And I will friend you, if I may, In the dark and cloudy day. There was a king reigned in the East: There, when kings will sit to feast, They get their fill before they think With poisoned meat and poisoned drink. He gathered all the springs to birth From the many-venomed earth; First a little, thence to more, He sampled all her killing store; And easy, smiling, seasoned sound, Sate the king when healths went round. They put arsenic in his meat And stared aghast to watch him eat; They poured strychnine in his cup And shook to see him drink it up: They shook, they stared as white's their shirt: Them it was their poison hurt. --I tell the tale that I heard told. Mithridates, he died old.

23 WHAT PROBLEMS WITH CONNOTATION MIGHT THE WORD CHOICE CREATE? WHY?

24 MAKE LIKE A BOY SCOUT AND BE PREPARED!!!!!!!!!

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26 POETRY IS MORE SENSUOUS—NO, NOT SENSUAL— IT IS RICHER IN IMAGERY THAN PROSE. WHAT IS IMAGERY? REPRESENTATION THROUGH LANGUAGE OF SENSE EXPERIENCE. POEMS NEED TO MAKE YOU FEEL THINGS!!!

27 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: PARTING OF MORNING DOES THE SEA ACTUALLY COME SUDDENLY AROUND THE CAPE OR APPEAR TO? WHY DOES BROWNING MENTION THE EFFECT BEFORE THE CAUSE?

28 1.WHAT IMAGERY DOES “A DOOR INTO THE DARK” CONVEY? SEAMUS HEANEY 2. HOW DOES THE IMAGERY EXPRESS THE BLACKSMITH’S ATTITUDE? PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 707

29 1.HOW DOES THE IMAGERY HELP THE CONTRAST BETWEEN REAPING AND MOWING? JEAN TOOMER 2. WHAT IS THE CONNOTATIVE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN REAPING AND MOWING? Black reapers with the sound of steel on stones Are sharpening scythes. I see them place the hones In their hip-pockets as a thing that's done, And start their silent swinging, one by one. Black horses drive a mower through the weeds, And there, a field rat, startled, squealing bleeds, His belly close to ground. I see the blade, Blood-stained, continue cutting weeds and shade.

30 The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold, And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold; And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea, When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee. Like the leaves of the forest when Summer is green, That host with their banners at sunset were seen: Like the leaves of the forest when Autumn hath blown, That host on the morrow lay withered and strown. For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast, And breathed in the face of the foe as he passed; And the eyes of the sleepers waxed deadly and chill, And their hearts but once heaved, and for ever grew still! And there lay the steed with his nostril all wide, But through it there rolled not the breath of his pride; And the foam of his gasping lay white on the turf, And cold as the spray of the rock-beating surf. And there lay the rider distorted and pale, With the dew on his brow, and the rust on his mail: And the tents were all silent, the banners alone, The lances unlifted, the trumpet unblown. And the widows of Ashur are loud in their wail, And the idols are broke in the temple of Baal; And the might of the Gentile, unsmote by the sword, Hath melted like snow in the glance of the Lord! Which words convey the most vivid imagery? What is the overall scene?

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33 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1.WHAT DO WE CALL LANGUAGE THAT CANNOT BE TAKEN LITERALLY? 2. WHAT IS APOSTROPHE? 3. WHAT IS METONYMY?

34 WITH A PARTNER ANSWER QUESTIONS 1-10 ON PAGE 724. BE PREPARED TO GIVE AN DEFEND YOUR ANSWER.

35 1.IDENTIFY THE SPEAKER. RIDDLE, ELEPHANT, HOUSE, MELON, STAGE,COW SYLVIA PLATH 2.IDENTIFY THE LITERAL MEANINGS OF THE RELATED METAPHORS. SYLLABLES, TENDRILS, FRUIT, IVORY, TIMBERS, LOAF, YEASTY RISING, MONEY, PURSE, TRAIN. 3. HOW DOES THE FORM OF THE POEM RELATE TO THE CONTENT. I'm a riddle in nine syllables, An elephant, a ponderous house, A melon strolling on two tendrils. O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers! This loaf's big with its yeasty rising. Money's new-minted in this fat purse. I'm a means, a stage, a cow in calf. I've eaten a bag of green apples,. Boarded the train there's no getting off.

36 1.EXPLAIN THE SIMILE IN LINE 3. BILLY COLLINS 2. ANALYZE THE LAST FIVE LINES AS AN EXTENDED METAPHOR. I ask them to take a poem and hold it up to the light like a color slide or press an ear against its hive. I say drop a mouse into a poem and watch him probe his way out, or walk inside the poem's room and feel the walls for a light switch. I want them to waterski across the surface of a poem waving at the author's name on the shore. But all they want to do is tie the poem to a chair with rope and torture a confession out of it. They begin beating it with a hose to find out what it really means.

37 I taste a liquor never brewed, From tankards scooped in pearl; Not all the vats upon the Rhine Yield such an alcohol! Inebriate of air am I, And debauchee of dew, Reeling, through endless summer days, From inns of molten blue. When landlords turn the drunken bee Out of the foxglove's door, When butterflies renounce their drams, I shall but drink the more! Till seraphs swing their snowy hats, And saints to windows run, To see the little tippler Leaning against the sun! WHAT IS THE EXTENDED METAPHOR? SUPPORT WITH THE TEXT.

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40 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1. WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF A SYMBOL? 2. WHAT IS AN ALLEGORY?

41 1.WHO ARE THE “SOME” ? ROBERT FROST 2. WHAT DO FIRE AND ICE SYMBOLIZE? 3. DOES THE AUTHOR’S LANGUAGE EFFECTIVELY CONVEY HIS MEANING? Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice. From what I’ve tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire. But if it had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate To know that for destruction ice Is also great And would suffice

42 1.WHAT DO DOGS AND CATS SYMBOLIZE. ALASTAIR REED 2. ANALYZE THE USE OF DEATH, DIE, AND DYING. PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 749

43 Living in the earth-deposits of our history Today a backhoe divulged out of a crumbling flank of earth one bottle amber perfect a hundred-year-old cure for fever or melancholy a tonic for living on this earth in the winters of this climate. Today I was reading about Marie Curie: she must have known she suffered from radiation sickness her body bombarded for years by the element she had purified It seems she denied to the end the source of the cataracts on her eyes the cracked and suppurating skin of her finger-ends till she could no longer hold a test-tube or a pencil She died a famous woman denying her wounds denying her wounds came from the same source as her power. WHAT IS HER POWER? IS IT SYMBOL OR ALLEGORY?

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46 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1.DEFINE PARADOX, OVERSTATEMENT, UNDERSTATEMENT, AND IRONY. 2. DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN VERBAL IRONY, SATIRE, AND SARCASM.

47 1.WHAT IS THE PARADOX IN THE FIRST QUATRAIN? JOHN DONNE 2. WHAT IS THE DOUBLE MEANING OF RAVISH IN LINE 14. HOW DOES THAT CREATE A PARADOX. Batter my heart, three-personed God, for you As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend; That I may rise, and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new. I, like an usurped town, to another due, Labour to admit you, but Oh, to no end. Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend, But is captived, and proves weak or untrue. Yet dearly I love you, and would be loved fain, But am betrothed unto your enemy: Divorce me, untie or break that knot again, Take me to you, imprison me, for I, Except you enthrall me, never shall be free, Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me.

48 1.EXPLAIN THE IMPORTANCE OR RELEVANCE OF THE OVERSTATEMENT IN LINE 49.. ELISAVIETTA RITCHIE 2. WHAT IS THE SPEAKER’S TONE? PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 767

49 HISTORY TEACHER Trying to protect his students' innocence he told them the Ice Age was really just the Chilly Age, a period of a million years when everyone had to wear sweaters. And the Stone Age became the Gravel Age, named after the long driveways of the time. The Spanish Inquisition was nothing more than an outbreak of questions such as "How far is it from here to Madrid?" "What do you call the matador's hat?" The War of the Roses took place in a garden, and the Enola Gay dropped one tiny atom on Japan. The children would leave his classroom for the playground to torment the weak and the smart, mussing up their hair and breaking their glasses, while he gathered up his notes and walked home past flower beds and white picket fences, wondering if they would believe that soldiers in the Boer War told long, rambling stories designed to make the enemy nod off. What do the historical references have in common? Identify and discuss the euphemisms

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52 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1. WHAT IS AN ALLUSION? 2. WHAT DOES THE POEM “OUT,OUT-” ALLUDE TO?

53 1.LOOK UP AND EXPLAIN THE ALLUSIONS TO TANTALUS AND SISYPHUS. COUNTEE CULLEN 2. ANALYZE THE MEANING AND THE CHOICE OF THE LAST LINE. 3. IDENTIFY THE “IRONIES” IN THE POEM. I doubt not God is good, well-meaning, kind And did He stoop to quibble could tell why The little buried mole continues blind, Why flesh that mirrors Him must some day die, Make plain the reason tortured Tantalus Is baited by the fickle fruit, declare If merely brute caprice dooms Sisyphus To struggle up a never-ending stair. Inscrutable His ways are, and immune To catechism by a mind too strewn With petty cares to slightly understand What awful brain compels His awful hand. Yet do I marvel at this curious thing: To make a poet black, and bid him sing!

54 1.WHO IS ORPHEUS ADRIENNE RICH 2. EXPLAIN THE CONNOTATION OF ROLLS-ROYCE. 3. ANALYZE THE EXPRESSION “HELL’S ANGELS” AS FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE. PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 789

55 IN JUST in Just- spring when the world is mud- luscious the little lame balloonman whistles far and wee and eddieandbill come running from marbles and piracies and it's spring when the world is puddle-wonderful the queer old balloonman whistles far and wee and bettyandisbel come dancing from hop-scotch and jump-rope and it's spring and the goat-footed balloonMan whistles far and wee IDENTIFY THE ALLUSIONS. DO THEY IMPROVE THE POEM?

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58 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1. DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN TOTAL MEANING AND PROSE MEANING. 2. HOW DO THE POEMS “STOPPING BY WOODS ON A SNOWY EVENING” AND “LOVELIEST OF TREES” DIFFER IN IDEA?

59 1.WHY DOES THE AUTHOR USE A DELIBERATE CLICHÉ? WHAT IS THAT CLICHÉ? JOHN KEATS 2. HOW EFFECTIVE IS THE ALLUSION TO PETRARCH? If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, And, like Andromeda, the Sonnet sweet Fetter'd, in spite of pained loveliness, Let us find, if we must be constrain'd, Sandals more interwoven and complete To fit the naked foot of Poesy: Let us inspect the Lyre, and weigh the stress Of every chord, and see what may be gain'd By ear industrious, and attention meet; Misers of sound and syllable, no less Than Midas of his coinage, let us be Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown; So, if we may not let the Muse be free, She will be bound with garlands of her own.

60 1.EXPLAIN THE DENOTATIVE AND CONNOTATIVE MEANINGS OF QUICK. EDWIN DENBY 2. PARAPHRASE THE POEM. PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 802

61 1.DESCRIBE THE PERSONIFICATION OF DEATH. BILLY COLLINS 2. WHAT IS THE POEM SAYING ABOUT FEAR OF DEATH AND DEATH ITSELF. PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 801

62 FAITH is a fine invention For gentlemen who see; But microscopes are prudent In an emergency! WHAT IS THE EMERGENCY? WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF SEEING?

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65 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1.WHAT IS TONE? 2. WHAT IS THE TONE OF “MY MISTRESS’S EYES”?

66 1.WHAT IS THE TONE OF THE POEM. JOHN DONNE 2. HOW DOES THE WOMAN “TRIUMPH” IN STANZA 3 AND WHAT WAS THE SPEAKER’S RESPONSE? PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 814

67 1.EXAMINE THE POEM FOR AT LEAST 4 ELEMENTS OF FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE. GAVIN EWART 2. WHAT IS THE TONE OF THE POEM AND HOW IS IT CHANGED FROM LINE TO LINE. The love we thought would never stop now cools like a congealing chop. The kisses that were hot as curry are bird-pecks taken in a hurry. The hands that held electric charges now lie inert as four moored barges. The feet that ran to meet a date are running slow and running late. The eyes that shone and seldom shut are victims of a power cut. The parts that then transmitted joy are now reserved and cold and coy. Romance, expected once to stay, has left a note saying gone away.

68 Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Though wise men at their end know dark is right, Because their words had forked no lightning they Do not go gentle into that good night. Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, Do not go gentle into that good night. Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. And you, my father, there on the sad height, Curse, bless me now with your fierce tears, I pray. Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light. What is the tone? Which stanzas help convey that tone best?

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71 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1. WHAT IS ONOMATOPOEIA? 2. WHY IS IT BEST TO NOT MAKE EXAGGERATED CLAIMS ABOUT SOUND AND MEANING?

72 ADRIENNE RICH Aunt Jennifer's tigers prance across a screen, Bright topaz denizens of a world of green. They do not fear the men beneath the tree; They pace in sleek chivalric certainty. Aunt Jennifer's fingers fluttering through her wool Find even the ivory needle hard to pull. The massive weight of Uncle's wedding band Sits heavily upon Aunt Jennifer's hand. When Aunt is dead, her terrified hands will lie Still ringed with ordeals she was mastered by. The tigers in the panel that she made Will go on prancing, proud and unafraid. 1. IDENTIFY ANY ONOMATOPOEIA 2. WHAT IS THE CONNOTATION OF “MASSIVE WEIGHT OF UNCLE’S WEDDING BAND”?

73 MARK DOTY Fetch? Balls and sticks engage my attention seconds at a time. Catch? I don't think so. Bunny, tumbling leaf, a squirrel who's -- oh joy --actually scared. Sniff the wind, then I'm off again: muck, pond, ditch, residue of any thrillingly dead thing. And you? Either you're sunk in the past, half our walk, thinking of what you can never bring back, or else you're off in some fog concerning --tomorrow, is that what it's called? My work: to unsnare time's warp (and woof!), retrieving, my haze-headed friend, you. This shining bark, a Zen master's bronzy gong, calls you here, entirely now: bow-wow, bow-wow, bow-wow 1. HOW DOES THE RHYTHM MIMIC A DOG’S MOVEMENT? 2. HOW DOES THE ONOMATOPOEIA ADD TO THE POEM’S CONTENT? 3. WHAT DOES THE POEM SAY ABOUT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DOG AND OWNER?

74 RECITAL BY JOHN UPDIKE Eskimos in Manitoba, Barracuda off Aruba, Cock an ear when Roger Bobo Starts to solo on the tuba. Men of every station -- Pooh-Bah, Nabob, bozo, toff, and hobo -- Cry in unison, "Indubi- Tably, there is simply nobo- Dy who oompahs on the tubo, Solo, quite like Roger Bubo!" How does the sound convey the sound of the instrument? How does sound affect meaning?

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77 AFTER READING YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1. WHAT IS ART-ULTIMATELY? 2. WHAT IS EXTERNAL SHAPE CALLED? 3. WHAT IS A REPEATED UNIT HAVING THE SAME NUMBER OF LINES? 4. WHAT ARE THE TWO MAIN TYPES OF POETRY FORMS IN ENGLISH ?

78 WENDY COPE 1.WHAT DOES EACH STANZA REPRESENT. 2. IS THE REPETITION EFFECTIVE? PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 895

79 MICHAEL MCFEE 1.DISCUSS THE TITLE IN RELATION TO THE SHAPE OF THE POEM. 2. DISCUSS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FORM AND MEANING. 3. DISCUSS THE TONE OF THE POEM. PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 901

80 WITH A PARTNER, COMPLETE THE EXERCISE ON PAGE 890. BE PREPARED TO DEFEND YOUR ANSWERS.

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83 AFTER READING PAGES YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: 1. WHAT IS THE FIRST STEP IN EVALUATING POETRY? 2. WHAT THREE QUESTIONS MUST BE ASKED \ ABOUT POETRY?

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86 JOHN KEATS 1. WHAT MOTIVATES THE AUTHOR’S CHANGE FROM LINES 5-10 TO 11-14? 2. EXPLAIN HOW THE POEM REPRESENTS APOSTROPHE. 3. WHAT SENSORY EXPERIENCES ARE EVOKED IN THE POEM? PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 918

87 ROBERT FROST 1. WHAT IS THE CONFLICT IN THE POEM? WHAT CAUSES THAT CONFLICT? 2. POINT OUT AND ANALYZE THE OVERGENERALIZATIONS IN THE POEM. 3. WHAT IS THE FUNCTION OF THE FOLLOWING LINES: 25,39,92-93? PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 921

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