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Chapter 22 Homework 1-17 Page 445-. Insulators vs. conductors What is the purpose of an insulator?

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 22 Homework 1-17 Page 445-. Insulators vs. conductors What is the purpose of an insulator?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 22 Homework 1-17 Page 445-

2 Insulators vs. conductors What is the purpose of an insulator?

3 1-5 1.Loose electrons (1-2 in the outer shell) are characteristic of metals. These electrons are responsible for transferring thermal energy through the conducting material. 2.Since metal is a better conductor than paper, wood or cloth, it draws more energy from a person’s skin.

4 Conductors Materials composed of atoms with “loose” outer electrons are good conductors of heat (and electricity also). Because metals have the “loosest” outer electrons, they are the best conductors of heat and electricity Conduction

5 1-5 3.A conductor transfers heat quickly, an insulator moves heat slowly.

6 The tile floor feels cold to the bare feet, while the carpet at the same temperature feels warm. This is because tile is a better conductor than carpet Conduction

7 Insulators Liquids and gases generally make poor conductors. An insulator is any material that is a poor conductor of heat and that delays the transfer of heat. Air is a very good insulator. Porous materials having many small air spaces are good insulators Conduction

8 1-5 4.A good insulator either prevents rapid movement of thermal energy or traps air (which is a good insulator) in dead spaces. 5.Cold is the absence of thermal energy or heat.

9 The good insulating properties of materials such as wool, wood, straw, paper, cork, polystyrene, fur, and feathers are largely due to the air spaces they contain. Birds fluff their feathers to create air spaces for insulation. Snowflakes imprison a lot of air in their crystals and are good insulators. Snow is not a source of heat; it simply prevents any heat from escaping too rapidly Conduction

10 1-5 5.Cold is the absence of thermal energy or heat.

11 A “warm” blanket does not provide you with heat; it simply slows the transfer of your body heat to the surroundings Conduction

12

13 Snow lasts longest on the roof of a well-insulated house. The houses with more snow on the roof are better insulated Conduction

14 Fiberglass Insulation

15 Insulators slow down the transfer of thermal energy from the hotter to the colder substance Strictly speaking, there is no “cold” that passes through a conductor or an insulator. Only heat is transferred. We don’t insulate a home to keep the cold out; we insulate to keep the heat in. No insulator can totally prevent heat from getting through it. Insulation slows down heat transfer Insulation and Heat Flow

16 Which will best insulate your ice cube? Aluminum foil Brown paper towel Sealed flask (Air and glass) Styrofoam cup with sealed lid

17 6-9 6.Warmed air is less dense than cool air, so it is buoyed upward.

18 In convection, heat is transferred by movement of the hotter substance from one place to another Convection

19 Convection occurs in all fluids. a.Convection currents transfer heat in air Convection

20 Convection occurs in all fluids. a.Convection currents transfer heat in air. b.Convection currents transfer heat in liquid Convection

21 When the test tube is heated at the top, convection is prevented and heat can reach the ice by conduction only. Since water is a poor conductor, the top water will boil without melting the ice Convection

22 6-9 7.Since the land is warmer during the day, the air above the land becomes less dense and rises. The cooler air over the water then flows towards the land to fill the space left behind. During the evening, the land cools more than the water, so the warmer air over the water rises and the cooler air over the land flows towards the water. (Sea vs. land breeze)

23 Convection currents are produced by uneven heating. a.During the day, the land is warmer than the air, and a sea breeze results Convection

24 Convection currents are produced by uneven heating. a.During the day, the land is warmer than the air, and a sea breeze results. b.At night, the land is cooler than the water, so the air flows in the other direction Convection

25 6-9 8.The temperature of a gas increases when it is compressed and decreases when it expands (that is adiabatic). 9.Falling dominoes is most similar to conduction (particle to particle transfer of thermal energy)

26 According to the ideal-gas law, when a gas is compressed into a smaller volume, the number and velocity of molecular collisions increase, raising the gas's temperature and pressure. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

27 6-9 9.Falling dominoes is most similar to conduction (particle to particle transfer of thermal energy)

28 Heat from the flame causes atoms and free electrons in the end of the metal to move faster and jostle against others. The energy of vibrating atoms increases along the length of the rod Conduction

29 Radiant energy is the energy in electromagnetic waves (light energy). Ex: The heat radiating from the hot pavement is infrared light.

30 In radiation, heat is transmitted in the form of radiant energy, or electromagnetic waves Radiation

31 Radiant energy is any energy that is transmitted by radiation. From the longest wavelength to the shortest, this includes: radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays, and gamma rays Radiation

32 a.Radio waves send signals through the air Radiation

33 a.Radio waves send signals through the air. b.You feel infrared waves as heat Radiation

34 a.Radio waves send signals through the air. b.You feel infrared waves as heat. c.A visible form of radiant energy is light waves Radiation

35 Most of the heat from a fireplace goes up the chimney by convection. The heat that warms us comes to us by radiation Radiation

36 Higher temperature sources produce electromagnetic waves of higher frequencies.

37 Objects at low temperatures emit long waves. Higher-temperature objects emit waves of shorter wavelengths. Objects around you emit radiation mostly in the long-wavelength end of the infrared region, between radio and light waves. Shorter-wavelength infrared waves are absorbed by our skin, producing the sensation of heat. Heat radiation is infrared radiation Emission of Radiant Energy

38 Shorter wavelengths are produced when the rope is shaken more rapidly Emission of Radiant Energy

39 The radiation emitted by the object provides the reading. The average frequency of radiant energy is directly proportional to the Kelvin temperature T of the emitter: Typical classroom infrared thermometers operate in the range of about -30°C to 200°C Emission of Radiant Energy

40 Good emitters of radiant energy are also good absorbers; poor emitters are poor absorbers Absorption of Radiant Energy

41 A good absorber of thermal energy is a poor emitter of thermal energy. 13. Since black is a better emitter, the black pot will cool faster. 14. A good absorber of radiant energy appears black because it absorbs rather than reflects light.

42 Absorption and Reflection Absorption and reflection are opposite processes. A good absorber of radiant energy reflects very little radiant energy, including the range of radiant energy we call light. A good absorber therefore appears dark. A perfect absorber reflects no radiant energy and appears perfectly black Absorption of Radiant Energy

43 Since black is a better emitter, the black pot will cool faster. 14. A good absorber of radiant energy appears black because it absorbs rather than reflects light.

44 A blacktop pavement and dark automobile body may remain hotter than their surroundings on a hot day. At nightfall these dark objects cool faster! Sooner or later, all objects in thermal contact come to thermal equilibrium. So a dark object that absorbs radiant energy well emits radiation equally well Absorption of Radiant Energy

45 The visible light entering the eye is absorbed, making the pupil appear black.

46 Even though the interior of the box has been painted white, the hole looks black Absorption of Radiant Energy

47 Radiant energy that enters an opening has little chance of leaving before it is completely absorbed Absorption of Radiant Energy

48 The red-hot poker in the cold room will cool faster because of the greater difference in temperature (temperature gradient) 17. Yes. example: frozen meat will warm faster in a warmer room.

49 Newton’s law of cooling also holds for heating. If an object is cooler than its surroundings, its rate of warming up is also proportional to ∆T Newton’s Law of Cooling

50 Yes. example: frozen meat will warm faster in a warmer room.

51 The colder an object’s surroundings, the faster the object will cool…and…the warmer the object’s surroundings the faster a cold object will warm Newton’s Law of Cooling


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