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Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All Radio Aspects of Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) Task Force Convenor: Jacques Hulshof Document.

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Presentation on theme: "Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All Radio Aspects of Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) Task Force Convenor: Jacques Hulshof Document."— Presentation transcript:

1 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All Radio Aspects of Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) Task Force Convenor: Jacques Hulshof Document No: GSC16-GRSC9-22 Source: Radio Aspects of EAS Task Force Contact: Jacques Hulshof GSC Session: GRSC-9 Agenda Item: 7.3

2 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC The heart of the system: the tag It contains a resonant circuit, consisting of an air coiled loop and a capacitor. The tag is attached to an article prior to being put on sale (PoS). It can be either a hard tag or a paper tag. At PoS hard tags are removed by a strong magnet called detacher. The paper tags are destroyed by means of a so called deactivator. It uses the principle of a pulse listen system. The system scans over the band, and once it discovers a tag within range it produces a burst at the resonance frequency of the tag with much higher field strength than the normal scanning field strength.

3 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC The gates The tag is destroyed/removed so it cannot be detected by the gates anymore. An induction loop antenna system sweeps over the frequency band or is of the pulse listen principle meaning it is pulsing at a certain frequency and listens if a tag in area. If a tag is detected, the system raises an alarm. Typically these (antenna) gates are located at the exits of shops.

4 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC Shoplifting growing problem Shoplifting is a growing social worldwide problem. EAS systems are applied to reduce customer theft –Global shrinkage 36 countries US $104.5 billion(1.34 % of retail sales)* –Customer theft worldwide US $ 43.1 billion is 41.2 % of total shrinkage North America customer theft US $ 14.2 billion, 0.54 % of total sales Latin America customer theft US $ 1.8 billion, 0.51 % of total sales South Africa customer theft US $ 247 million, 0.54 % of total sales Asia-Pacific customer theft US $ 7.9 billion, 0.62 % of total sales NOTE: Ref. “The Global Retail Theft Barometer (2008)” by Centre for Retail Research

5 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC What is the problem ? At present, retailers place security tags on their merchandise locally, paying their own staff to perform this task. Source tagging at the point of manufacture of the merchandise is increasing and can significantly reduce the overall cost. Increasing source tagging of goods for global delivery requires the harmonization of systems and frequencies on a global level. There are some concerns over potential interference with existing safety & distress systems. Similar systems are developing for medical implants; devices used inside and outside aircraft; ID cards; luggage handling systems in airports, item management, logistics, livestock, etc. A full description can be found in document GSC-15-GRSC8-11a1.

6 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC Frequencies applied for EAS ITU Radio Regulations kHz –Radio navigation –Fixed Maritime Mobile –Maritime Radio navigation kHz –Broadcasting and fixed mobile except aeronautical mobile –Fixed maritime mobile –Maritime mobile kHz distress frequency for digital selective calling kHz distress frequency for narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy kHz search and rescue operations concerning manned space vehicles kHz frequency for the transmission of maritime safety information

7 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC Regions/Countries considered Regulations in regions/countries: Europe (Region 1) USA/Canada* (Region 2) China (Region 3) Japan (Region 3) Korea (Region 3) *Canada/USA same regulations

8 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC Regulations kHz Europe 72 dBµA/m to 65 dB 10 m ( kHz 42 dBµA/m) US/Canada 2400/f 300 m, same as Europe China m, same as Europe Korea 66.5 to m (approx. 100x lower than Europe) Japan 15 λ/2π, comparable with Europe (low end higher)

9 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Regulations kHz Europe 9 10 m US/Canada 11.5 dB 30 m with demands for restricted bands (almost equal to Europe) China and kHz: 9 10 m Korea 9.1 3m (approx. 10x lower than Europe) Japan 2.5 3m (approx. 20x lower than Europe) 9

10 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Activities since GSC-15 Activity ITU-R WP1B ITU-R WP1B developed a Report listing common frequency bands that are used for the deployment of SRDs in all regions of the world. However, not all of these bands listed as common bands are harmonized for SRD use either regionally or globally. ITU-R Radio Communication Groups Source: Document 1/BL/7-E, 19 August 2011 Subject: Resolution ITU-R 54 Revision 1 to Document 1/178 DRAFT NEW RECOMMENDATION ITU ‑ R SM.[SRD] Frequency ranges for global and regional harmonization of short range devices (SRDs) 10

11 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Scope of DNR ITU-R SM.[SRD] This Recommendation contains frequency ranges to be used as recommended ranges for SRD applications requiring operation on a global or regional harmonized basis. 11

12 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Abbreviated considerations of DNR ITU-R SM.[SRD] considering a)Radiocommunication Assembly 2007 approved Resolution ITU ‑ R 54; b)increasing demand for and use of SRDs throughout the world; c)SRD applications are deployed in bands for ISM - and non ISM applications; d)SRDs are not ISM applications as defined in No of the Radio Regulations; e)SRDs are used on a worldwide basis, are often carried, used across national borders; f)specific interference mitigation techniques may facilitate the operation of SRDs; g)some SRDs may employ advanced spectrum access techniques; h)coexistence of SRDs with similar technical characteristics can be guaranteed; i)- j)SRD applications are increasing, which may result in increasing spectrum demands; k)necessary to use the existing spectrum more efficiently and economically. 12

13 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Further considerations and notes of DNR ITU-R SM.[SRD] further considering that SRDs may create the potential for harmful interference to radiocommunication services, and some of them can be carried by individuals across national boundaries and Radio communication Assembly 2007 approved Resolution ITU ‑ R 54; noting a)that Resolution ITU ‑ R 54 states that the ITU ‑ R should continue its studies to enable implementation of advanced technologies for SRDs, thereby in particular focusing on a strategy for the future; b)that frequency ranges, power levels and other technical and operating parameters commonly used by SRDs are listed in Report ITU ‑ R SM.2153 “Technical and operating parameters and spectrum use for short-range radiocommunication devices”, 13

14 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Recognitions and recommendations of DNR ITU-R SM.[SRD] recognizing a)that the regulatory framework for SRDs, such as the decision on frequency bands for use by SRDs, is a national matter; b)that there are a number of benefits of global or regional harmonization of frequency ranges for SRD usage for end users, manufacturers and regulators, such as: a broader manufacturing base and increased volume of devices, resulting in economies of scale and equipment availability; improved spectrum utilization; c)that, in principle, SRDs have no requirement for an individual licence as they generally use the radio spectrum on a non-interference and non-protected basis. However, in specific cases licensing or registration may be required, recommends that for SRDs requiring operation on a global or regional harmonized basis, the frequency ranges as specified in Annex 1 and Annex 2 may be considered, if appropriate. 14

15 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Examples of SRDs according to DNR ITU-R SM.[SRD] Example applications of such SRDs are the following: medical applications; SRD applications used inside and outside aircraft; SRDs for supporting ID cards; some Intelligent Transport System (ITS) applications; RFID applications for luggage handling systems in airports, item management, logistics, livestock, electronic article surveillance (EAS) and Near Field Communication (NFC). 15

16 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC Annex 1 of document DNR ITU-R SM.[SRD] Frequency ranges for global harmonization of SRDs Frequency ranges as contained in Table below are based on information from Report ITU ‑ R SM.2153 and contributions from administrations attending relevant ITU ‑ R meetings. The Table may not reflect the actual situation. In this regard, further information is to be sought from administrations. Frequency range kHz for Inductive SRD applications

17 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Annex 2 of document DNR ITU-R SM.[SRD] Frequency ranges for regional harmonization of SRDs Frequency ranges and their availability in various Regions as contained in the Table below are based on information from Report ITU ‑ R SM.2153 and contributions from administrations attending relevant ITU ‑ R meetings. The Table may not reflect the actual and prevailing situation in each country and/or Region. In this regard, further information is to be sought from administrations. Frequency range: kHz Region 1 Available Region 2 Available Region 3 Available in some countries 17

18 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 How to join or by sending an to Julian Pritchard 18

19 Halifax, 31 Oct – 3 Nov 2011ICT Accessibility For All GSC16-GRSC9-22 Next steps To hold a first face-to-face meeting in Shanghai in the year


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