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Robert Johnson Livable Streets Advocacy Training.

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Presentation on theme: "Robert Johnson Livable Streets Advocacy Training."— Presentation transcript:

1 Robert Johnson Livable Streets Advocacy Training

2 The unified voice for active living, promoting a healthy, safe and accessible outdoor experience for all in a vibrant, engaged community. Our Mission

3 What is an Advocate?  Someone who pleads the cause of another; who defends or maintains a cause or proposal; or who supports or promotes the interests of another.

4 What is an Campaign?  A connected series of operations designed to bring about a particular result

5 Do You Want to Campaign?

6 We do Not Need to Be Negative

7 People are ready for this change We do Not Need to Be Negative

8 People are ready for this change They just need to know about it People are ready for this change We do Not Need to Be Negative

9 Complete Street (Before)

10  1.2 million are under the age of 16  756,000 are over the age of 65  378,000 between have at least one physical disability  40% of all Missourians Millions of Missourians Cannot Drive

11  1.2 million are under the age of 16  756,000 are over the age of 65  378,000 between have at least one physical disability  40% of all Missourians Millions of Missourians Cannot Drive Does the Status Quo work for them?

12 The citizens of the United States sent 32.6 billion dollars of their wealth overseas on foreign oil Finances

13 The citizens of the United States sent 32.6 billion dollars of their wealth overseas on foreign oil In January 2011 Finances

14 Today’s children may be the first to not outlive their parents Health

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18 Health & Finances No sidewalks No connections around school

19 Complete Street (Before)

20 Complete Street (After)

21 General Strategies for Effective Advocacy

22 Be an Informed Citizen  How transportation policies affect lives  Communicate policies to elected officials  Most of what you need to know can be found in the Advocacy Manual given to you today

23 Join an Advocacy Organization  Local: BikeWalkKC  State: KanBikeWalk and MoBikeFed  National: League of American Bicyclists  Funds  alerts

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25 Educate Others  Ask what Livable Streets means to them  Slightly tweak  Handle objections

26 Facilitate Effective Meetings  Pick a time and place that is appropriate for the group  Build a strong agenda  Ensure good facilitation

27 Understand and Change Perspectives  You are here: You are likely not “normal!”

28 Perspectives; Ask Questions  If you did decide to walk or bicycle……  What about Federal, State and local policy…..

29 Set Reasonable Goals and Compromise  Users and infrastructure at the same time  Baby steps

30 Be Completely Credible  Appearance  Positive & visionary  Follow up

31 Complete Streets Is Not A Partisan Issue So Do Not Make It One

32 Non-partisan  Identify the qualities of Livable Streets that appeal to the two main parties.

33 Steps to Building a Successful Campaign

34 Is Your Campaign the Right Fit?  Has reasonable prospects for victory  Results in definite community improvement  Engages important groups of people  Fits your organization or neighborhood’s mission, culture and resources  Leverages positive media

35 Step 1: Define Your Issue  Identify the problem  Formulate a solution  Illustrate how to implement the solution  List people who care about what’s at stake for them These are your stakeholders.  Formulate your Quick Pitch

36 Step 2: Set Your Campaign Goals  Goals should represent the social changes you wish to see  The long term goal should be be the overall goal of the campaign  Short and medium-term goals are steps toward the overall goal  Short and medium goals can be small  It is very important that your neighborhood or organization goals support the campaign

37 Step 3: Assess Your Resources: SWOT  List your strengths  E.g. Strong fundraising ability  List your weaknesses  E.g. No membership structure  Opportunities  E.g. Safe Routes to School Funding  Threats  E.g. Community detractors, NIMBYs

38 Step 4: Strategize: Who has the power to make the change you seek?  Primary Targets  Specific people  Not simply “city council or MoDOT”  Who can apply for that grant; who must support your effort?  Secondary Targets  People who have influence over the primary targets  Public Targets  Geographic: Neighborhoods, street corridors, schools, business districts  Constituencies: Soccer moms, citizens of low wealth

39 Obtain Stakeholders Commitments  Ask the important questions  Wait for an answer

40 Reach out to Stakeholders  Prioritize based upon the effectiveness of communication.  Face to face  Telephone conversation 

41 Identify a Champion

42 Strategy: Who has the power to make the change you seek?  Create a Power Map Crosswalk on B St. Primary Targets Secondary Targets Connections to all targets

43 Step 5: Communicate  Brainstorm ways to use social media  Compose a personal story  Write a letter to the editor  Write your stair speech  Hook  Problem  Solution  Specific actions  Slogan

44 Communicate: Media Tactics  Press Release  Op-ed  Pitch your story to news outlets  Local radio or TV shows  Public Service Announcements  Editorials or Columnists

45 Step 6: Tactics and Timelines  Draft a tactic (to-do list)  Give it a deadline  Identify the lead person E.g. Identify allies in neighborhood: Your Stakeholders May 15, 2011 Neighborhood Association President TacticDateLead Person

46 Step 7: Manage Your Resources  Large campaigns can cost money  Your campaign may not require much money  It is important to consider what your expenses may be  Personnel  Professional Expenses  Printing, materials, mailing  Seek in-kind support from stakeholders  Outline possible income the campaign can generate

47 Speaking at Public Meetings

48 Research Protocol  Length of speaking time?  Are you allowed to use media?  Distribute documents?

49 Coordinate Stakeholders  Plan talking points  Plan for potential arguments  Respect the stakeholders efforts

50 Questions and Answers

51 Step 1: Define Your Issue  Identify the problem (e.g. Crossing B Street is unsafe)  Formulate a solution (e.g. B St. needs a crosswalk)  Illustrate how to implement the solution (e.g. city should fund crosswalk and pedestrian signal)  List people who care about what’s at stake for them (e.g. families, neighbors, disabled, runners, etc.). These are your stakeholders. Quick Pitch: Put these four elements together in sentence or two that can be recited quickly.


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