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TITLE: HOW MY FAMILY LIVES IN AMERICA AUTHOR: SUSAN KUKLIN GENRE: NONFICTION Big Question: How are communities and families similar around the world?

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Presentation on theme: "TITLE: HOW MY FAMILY LIVES IN AMERICA AUTHOR: SUSAN KUKLIN GENRE: NONFICTION Big Question: How are communities and families similar around the world?"— Presentation transcript:

1 TITLE: HOW MY FAMILY LIVES IN AMERICA AUTHOR: SUSAN KUKLIN GENRE: NONFICTION Big Question: How are communities and families similar around the world?

2 Small Group Timer

3 Vocabulary Words More Words to Know admire custom famous mention overnight popular public twist heritage patient traditions accent accept characters How My Family Lives in America

4 Spelling Words to too two week weak our hour stair stare flour flower write right new knew their there they’re weather whether How My Family Lives in America

5 Big Question: How are communities and families similar around the world? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

6 Monday Question of the Day How are communities and families similar around the world?

7 Today we will learn about: Build Concepts Fact and Opinion Text Structure Vocabulary Build Background Fluency: Silent Reading Grammar: Adjective that Compare Spelling: Homophones Cultural Similarities

8 Fluency: Silent Reading When you are reading silently, just like reading aloud, you need to self-correct words you miss and block out noises. As I read “Under Our Skin” aloud, listen for facts and opinions Jenny expresses about her culture and what it’s like to live in America. Be ready to answer questions after the story.

9 Fluency: Silent Reading What does Jenny say is hard about her life in America? Are these facts or opinions? Why do you think Jenny wants to learn to read Chinese?

10 Build Concepts Build Concepts accent, accept, characters Fitting In Home Life Languages Cultural Similarities

11 PAGES Fact and Opinion

12 In nonfiction, authors give statements of fact and opinion. Good readers can tell the difference between the two. Sometimes an author will compare and contrast two statements of fact or two statements of opinion. Other times, the author will compare and contrast facts with opinions.

13 Build Background Build Background Think about as many things as you can about these three countries, including location, languages, and customs. Senegal Puerto RicoTaiwan

14 Vocabulary Words Word Rating Chart WordKnowHave SeenDon’t Know admire custom famous mention overnight popular public twist

15 Vocabulary Words admire – to look at with wonder, pleasure, and approval custom – an old or popular way of doing things famous – very well know; noted mention – to tell or speak about something

16 Vocabulary Words overnight – during the night popular – liked by most people public – of or for everyone; belonging to the people twist – a braid formed by weaving together three or more strands of hair, ribbon, or yarntwist

17 More Vocabulary Words heritage – the culture and customs you get from history and family who lived before you patient – being able to wait calmly without getting anxious or upset traditions – things that you or your family do as part of your culture and customs

18 More Vocabulary Words accent – a different manner of pronunciation heard in different parts of the same country accept – to take what is offered or given to you characters – letters, numbers, marks, or signs Next slide

19 twist

20 Monday Grammar: Adjectives That Compare

21 juans family came from puerto rico to weeks ago Juan’s family came from Puerto Rico two weeks ago. which is the biggest city, san juan or new york Which is the bigger city, San Juan or New York?

22 Adjectives That Compare Puerto Rico is warmer than New York City. Warmer is used to compare Puerto Rico and New York City. When two things are compared, the ending –er is added to the adjective to make the comparative form.

23 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives are often used to make comparisons. To compare two people, places, or things, you usually add –er to an adjective. Puerto Rico has warmer weather than Florida.

24 Adjectives That Compare To compare three or more people, places, or things, you usually add –est to an adjective. Northern Africa has the warmest weather of all.

25 Adjectives That Compare Sometimes you must change the spelling of an adjective when you write the –er or –est form. Drop the final e: rare, rarer, rarest Change final y to i: spicy, spicier, spiciest Double final consonant: hot, hotter, hottest

26 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives That Compare Write the adjective that compares in each sentence. I think China has the strangest animals in the world. The giant panda is the heaviest panda of all.

27 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives That Compare Write the adjective that compares in each sentence. A red panda is a lighter animal than a giant panda. Pandas have the oddest diets of any animal.

28 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives That Compare Write the adjective that compares in each sentence. Bamboo plants are tastier than other food.

29 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives That Compare Write the adjective that correctly completes each sentence. Our family had a (nice, nicer) time in Africa. Our family had a nice time in Africa. We saw the (brighter, brightest) cloth in the world at the market. We saw the brightest cloth in the world at the market.

30 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives That Compare Write the adjective that correctly completes each sentence. We had the (hotter, hottest) day I can remember. We had the hottest day I can remember. The night was (cooler, coolest) than the day. The night was cooler than the day.

31 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives That Compare Write the adjective that correctly completes each sentence. We ate (spicy, spicier) meals than those at home. We ate spicier meals than those at home.

32 Monday Spelling: Homophones

33 Spelling Words to too two week weak our hour stair stare flour flower write right new knew their there they’re weather whether How My Family Lives in America

34 Tuesday Question of the Day In what way is Sanu proud of her heritage?

35 Today we will learn about: Homophones Antonyms Context Clues Fact and Opinion Text Structure Compare and Contrast Vocabulary Fluency: Silent Reading Grammar: Adjective That Compare Time for Social Studies: Location Skills Cultural Similarities

36 PAGE Vocabulary Strategy: Antonyms

37 How My Family Lives in America Page 174 – 183

38 Tuesday Fluency: Silent Reading Turn to page 181. As I read, notice how I self-correct when I misread a word. Now you read and practice reading page 181 silently.

39 Tuesday Grammar: Adjectives That Compare

40 the family had went to africa and had enjoyed being turists The family had gone to Africa and had enjoyed being tourists. it was the most greatest trip they had ever took It was the greatest trip they had ever taken.

41 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives are often used to make comparisons. To compare two people, places, groups, or things, you usually add –er to an adjective. This is called a comparative adjective. To compare three or more people, places, groups, or things, add –est to an adjective. This is called a superlative adjective.

42 Tuesday Spelling: Homophones

43 Spelling Words to too two week weak our hour stair stare flour flower write right new knew their there they’re weather whether How My Family Lives in America

44 Wednesday Question of the Day What lessons can you learn from Sanu, Eric, and April?

45 Today we will learn about: Fact and Opinion Text Structure Antonyms Develop Vocabulary Fluency: Model Silent Reading Grammar: Adjective That Compare Spelling: Homophones Time for Social Studies: Holidays Cultural Similarities

46 How My Family Lives in America Page

47 Wednesday Fluency: Paired Reading Turn to page 183. Be sure to self-correct as you read with your partner. Partners offer feedback and help identify words.

48 Wednesday Grammar: Adjectives That Compare

49 mom will right a letter to her nefew in china Mom will write a letter to her nephew in China. isnt he a great violen player Isn’t he a great violin player?

50 Adjectives That Compare Using comparative and superlative forms of adjectives is useful for comparing and contrasting two or more things. Minnesota is a cold place. Comparative: Alaska is a colder place than Minnesota. Superlative: The South Pole is the coldest place in the world.

51 Wednesday Spelling: Homophones

52 Spelling Words to too two week weak our hour stair stare flour flower write right new knew their there they’re weather whether How My Family Lives in America

53 Thursday Question of the Day What holidays do both Americans and people from other cultures celebrate?

54 Today we will learn about: Syllable Pattern V/V Textbook/Text Features Content-Area Vocabulary Fluency: Silent Reading Grammar: Adjectives That Compare Spelling: Homophones Community Life

55 Social Studies in Reading Communities Celebrate Cultures Turn to Page 192

56 Thursday Fluency: Silent Reading Turn to page 183. Be sure to self-correct as you read with your partner. Partners offer feedback and help identify words.

57 Thursday Grammar: Adjectives That Compare

58 lee new english before she moved to america Lee knew English before she moved to America. dan and her helped their parents with knew werds Dana and she helped their parents with new words.

59 Adjectives That Compare Test Tips: You may be asked to choose the correct comparative or superlative adjective form in a sentence. Remember that the –est ending is used only to compare three or more items. Incorrect: of the two tests, this was the hardest. Correct: of the two tests, this was the harder.

60 Thursday Spelling: Homophones

61 Spelling Words to too two week weak our hour stair stare flour flower write right new knew their there they’re weather whether How My Family Lives in America

62 Friday Question of the Day How are communities and families similar around the world?

63 Today we will learn about: Build Concept Vocabulary Fact and Opinion Author’s Viewpoint Context Clues Grammar: Adjectives That Compare Spelling: Homophones Maps and Globes Cultural Similarities

64 Fact and Opinion A statement of fact can be proved true or false. A statement of opinion gives someone’s thoughts or feelings about something. Words that express feelings, such as favorite and wonderful, are clues that this might be an opinion.

65 Author’s Viewpoint Author’s viewpoint is the way the author looks at the subject or ideas he or she is writing about. In some nonfiction, the author expresses opinions about the subject. When the author expresses an opinion, he or she must support it with facts and details.

66 Context Clues Sometimes context will contain an antonym that will be a good clue to learn the meaning of an unknown word. Let’s look at some examples.

67 Context Clues Word and Antonym as Context Clues Word Meaning The first two test questions were difficult, but the rest were very easy. I worked rapidly, even though my friends worked slowly. I like sweet fruit better than lemons because lemons are too tart.

68 Compound Words with Night or Day One of this week’s Words to Know is overnight, a compound word that means “during the night.” There are many words that contain the word night or day.

69 What do these compound words mean? daybreak yesterday nightgown daydream midnight midday nightmare today nightingale Tuesday Compound Words with Night or Day

70 Friday Grammar: Adjectives That Compare

71 of all the familys, the gomezes had the easiertime finding a home Of all the families, the Gomezes had the easiest time finding a home. they was helpful to others who came from cuba They were helpful to others who came from Cuba.

72 Adjectives That Compare Adjectives are often used to make comparisons. To compare two people, places, groups, or things, you usually add –er to an adjective. This is called a comparative adjective. To compare three or more people, places, groups, or things, add –est to an adjective. This is called a superlative adjective.

73 Homophones There are often different ways to spell the same sound. meet, meat How do you pronounce the first word? How do you pronounce the second word? Which word would make sense in this sentence? We stopped at the grocery store to buy ____ for dinner. I’ll ___ you in the gym after school.

74 Homophones It’s easy to get confused by homophones. Homophones sound alike, but they are spelled differently and have different meanings. When a sentence with a homophone doesn’t make sense, check to make sure you’re using the correct meaning for the homophone in the sentence.

75 Homophones Homophones Explain the difference in each pair of homophones. choose chews piece peace through threw way weigh The pail was full of pale green paint. Did you notice the deer, dear? Would you please put more wood on the fire?

76 Syllable Pattern V/V We learned to divide words that have the V/V syllable pattern. Read the sentence to yourself. Raise your hand when you see two words that have two vowels in a row.

77 Syllable Pattern V/V The gentle giant is not cruel. How many vowel sounds do you hear in each word? How many syllables do you hear in each word? Where should we divide the words? gi/ ant, cru/el

78 Syllable Pattern V/V Read the sentence to yourself. Raise your hand when you see two words that have two vowels in a row. The stadium became quiet. How many vowel sounds do you hear in each word? How many syllables do you hear in each word? Where should we divide the words? stadi/um, qui/et

79 Syllable Pattern V/V poetry cereal denial gradual radiator terrarium oriole polio initiate violet stereo annual The prisoner was on trial for a violet crime. The audience clapped for the violin solo. We didn’t realize we were ruining the new cement. Will you dial the number of the theater for me?

80 Friday Spelling: Homophones

81 Spelling Words to too two week weak our hour stair stare flour flower write right new knew their there they’re weather whether How My Family Lives in America

82 Maps and Globes Maps use the directions north, south, east, and west to describe locations. A compass rose is a symbol that shows these directions. The sizes and styles of labels on a map can sometimes give a clue about their importance. Usually bigger cities are shown in bigger type. Different typestyles are often used to show places, such as state and national parks, landforms, or recreational areas.

83 Maps and Globes Maps have a legend that shows how to read its features. The compass rose is usually part of the legend. A scale shows the distance a unit of measure stands for. Symbols show locations of places, such as airports, campsites, or parks.

84 Maps and Globes What kinds of symbols are used on this map? What are some major cities or landmarks on this map?

85 Review Games Spelling City: Spelling Words Vocabulary Words Other Vocabulary Words

86 We are now ready to take our story tests. Story test  Classroom webpage,  Reading Test AR  Other Reading Quizzes  Quiz # 11016


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