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Chapter 8 Crime and Criminal Justice. Chapter Outline  Crime and Deviance  Types of Crime  Organized Crime and Corporate Crime  Race, Class, Gender.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 8 Crime and Criminal Justice. Chapter Outline  Crime and Deviance  Types of Crime  Organized Crime and Corporate Crime  Race, Class, Gender."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 8 Crime and Criminal Justice

2 Chapter Outline  Crime and Deviance  Types of Crime  Organized Crime and Corporate Crime  Race, Class, Gender and Crime  The Criminal Justice System: Police, courts and the Law  Terrorism As International Crime: A Global Perspective

3 Crime and Deviance  Crime is a type of deviant behavior, but not all deviant behavior would be called crime.  Deviance becomes crime when it is designated by the institutions of society as violating such a law or laws.  Criminology is the study of crime from a scientific perspective.

4 Sociological Theories of Crime Functionalist Crime is learned through social interaction. Symbolic Interaction Societies need a certain level of crime to clarify norms. Conflict Theory The lower the social class, the more the individual is forced into criminality.

5 Sociological Theories of Crime Functionalist Crime results from social structural strains within society. Symbolic Interaction Labeling criminals tends to reinforce rather than deter crime. Conflict Theory Inequalities in society tends to produce criminal activity.

6 Sociological Theories of Crime Functionalist Crime may be functional to society, thus difficult to eradicate. Symbolic Interaction Institutions with the power to label produce rather than lessen crime. Conflict Theory Reducing social inequalities will reduce crime.

7 Violent Crime in the United States

8 Classifications of Crimes Personal crimes - murder, aggravated assault, rape, robbery Property crimes - burglary, larceny, auto theft, arson

9 Polling Question  Have you ever stolen little things worth between $2 and $50? A.) Yes B.) No

10 Polling Question  Have you ever stolen things worth more than $50? A.) Yes B.) No

11 Classifications of Crimes Victimless crimes - gambling, illegal drug use, prostitution Hate crimes - assaults and other malicious acts motivated by bias

12 White-collar or Elite Crime  Examples: embezzlement, insider trading, tax evasion  In terms of dollars, white-collar crime is much more consequential for society than street crimes.

13 Organized Crime  Crime committed by organized groups, typically involving the provision of illegal goods and services to others.  Organized crime syndicates include any group that exercises control over large illegal enterprises, such as the drug trade, illegal gambling, prostitution or weapons smuggling.  These industries are organized in the same kind of hierarchy as legitimate businesses.

14 Corporate Crime and Deviance  Occurs in the context of a formal organization or bureaucracy and is sanctioned by the norms and operating principles of the organization.  Can occur within any of organization: corporate, educational, governmental, or religious.  Example: Sexual assault of youths by Catholic priests, and the attempted cover-ups by assigning offending priests to parishes in different towns or states.

15 Race, Class, Gender and Crime  Certain groups are more likely than others to commit crime given that crime is linked to patterns of inequality in society.  Sociologist Ramiro Martinez Jr. explored the connection between rates of violence in Latino communities and the degree of inequality in 111 U.S. cities.  His research shows a clear link between likelihood of lethal violence and socioeconomic conditions for Latinos in these different cities.

16 Race and Crime  Minorities constitute 25% of the population of the United States but are more than 33% of the people arrested for property crimes and almost 50% of the people arrested for violent crimes.  Sociological research has shown that police discretion is strongly influenced by class and race judgments.

17 Victimization by Crime: A Class Phenomenon

18 Arrests by Race Crime WhiteBlack American Indian Asian/ Pacific Islander Murder Forcible Rape Robbery Forgery

19 Crime Victimization by Race and Gender

20 Factor’s in Increase in Crime By Women 1. Changes brought about by the women’s movement made women more likely to be employed in jobs that present opportunities for crimes such as property theft, embezzlement, and fraud. 2. The images women have of themselves are changing, making new behaviors possible. 3. Women on average remain in disadvantaged low-wage positions in the labor market.

21 The Policing of Minorities  Minority communities are policed more heavily than White neighborhoods.  Policing in minority communities has a different effect than in White, middle-class communities.  Numerous studies have also documented the severe treatment that Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and African Americans receive from the police.

22 Racial Profiling  The use of race alone as the criterion for deciding whether to stop and detain someone, such as the driver of an automobile, on suspicion of committing a crime.  While the crime rate for Blacks and Hispanics is higher than that of Whites, the majority of Blacks or Hispanics do not commit any crimes.  On a given day, there is roughly a 90% chance that an African American in a car has not committed a crime.

23 Race and Sentencing  Extensive research finds that once on trial, minority defendants are found guilty more often than White defendants.  At sentencing, Blacks and Latinos are likely to get longer sentences than Whites for the same crimes.  A study of Hispanic and White judges found that White judges sentence White defendants less severely than Hispanic defendants.

24 Race and the Death Penalty  Of the over 3500 prisoners currently on Death Row, 44% are Black.  Research shows that when Whites and minorities commit the same crime against a White victim, minorities are more likely to receive a more severe sentence.  Someone who kills a White person is also three times more likely to get the death penalty than someone who kills an African American, regardless of the race of the perpetrator.

25 Prisons  More than half of the federal and state male prisoners in the United States are racial minorities.  Blacks have the highest rates of imprisonment, followed by Hispanics, then Native Americans and Asians.  The United States and Russia have the highest rates of incarceration in the world.

26 Ten Leading Nations in Incarceration Rates

27 State and Federal Prison Population

28 Polling Question  Have you ever been arrested? A.) Yes B.) No

29 Prisons and Deterrence  Prisons rarely seem to deter or rehabilitate offenders.  Only 20% who are imprisoned for drug offenses ever receive drug treatment.  The prison experience is poorly suited to training prisoners in marketable skills or allowing them to repay their debt to society.

30 Terrorism  Terrorism is a crime that violates both international and domestic laws.  Terrorists crosses national borders and its understanding requires a global perspective.  Terrorism, whether domestic or international, is best understood not only as individual insanity, but also as a politically, economically, and socially oriented form of violence.

31 Quick Quiz

32 1. The study of crime from a scientific perspective is called: a. Criminal justice b. Criminology c. Criminal behaviorism d. Criminal studies

33 Answer: b  The study of crime from a scientific perspective is called criminology.

34 2. "The lower the social class, the more the individual is forced into criminality." This statement most closely reflects the: a. evolutionary perspective b. conflict perspective c. functionalist perspective d. symbolic interactionist perspective

35 Answer: b  "The lower the social class, the more the individual is forced into criminality." This statement most closely reflects the conflict perspective.

36 3. Which of the following is not considered an example of property crimes? a. arson b. larceny c. burglary d. gambling

37 Answer: d  Gambling is not considered an example of property crimes.

38 4. __________________ refers to criminal activities by persons of high social status who commit their crimes in the context of their occupation. a. Property crimes b. Personal crimes c. Elite crime d. Hate crimes

39 Answer: c  Elite crime refers to criminal activities by persons of high social status who commit their crimes in the context.


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