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1 The Civilian Response Corps USPHS Scientific and Training Symposium San Diego, CA - May 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "1 The Civilian Response Corps USPHS Scientific and Training Symposium San Diego, CA - May 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 The Civilian Response Corps USPHS Scientific and Training Symposium San Diego, CA - May 2010

2 2 The National Security Challenge According to Foreign Policy’s 2009 Index, there are 38 failed or failing states. Through an institutionalized and whole-of-government approach, the Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction & Stabilization (S/CRS) was established in 2004 to build a capability that can address a wide spectrum of these emerging threats. S/CRS works to prevent budding conflicts and respond to countries and regions at risk of, in, and/or emerging from instability. Adequately addressing the risks emanating from weak and failing states and ungoverned spaces is crucial to protecting U.S. national security interests.

3 3 S/CRS Engagements in 2009 Smart Power in Action 17 Countries on 4 Continents 17 Post-Conflict Operations Since the Cold War

4 4 Strong Weak Large Scale Intervention Drivers of Conflict Lead passed to local actors Goal Conflict Transformation Local Institutional Capacity

5 5 Capacity Building Our Resources ToolsFundingExpertsPartners

6 6 Building a State-of-the-Art Conflict Capability S/CRS is building and deploying a state of the art conflict capability and a systemized approach to crisis prevention and response Prevention Package Liberia Ecuador Yemen Sudan Afghanistan DRC Response Package ToolsFundingTeamsPartners One Comprehensive Capability

7 7 Conflict Prevention and Response ICAF Whole of Government Planning 1207 Funding

8 8 Civilian Response Corps Innovative Expeditionary Whole-of- Government  We draw from a wide range of U.S. government resources to establish the best team for each mission. Expeditionary  Our members are specially selected, trained, and equipped to deploy and operate in hazardous and austere environments with little or no notice. Innovative  We leverage specific skill sets, expertise, and robust experience working effectively with military and international actors. Preventive  Systematizing conflict prevention - changing the mindsets of decision makers. Essential Characteristics Preventive

9 9 Whole-of-Government

10 10 Developing Global R&S Partners  Ensuring that the U.S. and key partners are able to operate together on the ground –S/CRS works closely with UK and Canada to ensure civilian interoperability –Corps member serves as Kandahar PRT U.S. Chief of Staff integrating U.S. and Canadian civilian efforts  Ensuring that the U.S. and key partners can plan, assess, and train together –S/CRS and UK’s Stabilization Unit completed the Malakand Plan in Pakistan in 2009 –Corps members attend UK and Canadian training and vice versa –US and Australia will sign an MOU to promote joint field operations and collaborative training and planning  Increasing U.S. government secondments into critical UN and multilateral missions –Corps member serving as the first USG Security Sector expert in MONUC –Potential Corps embeds into UNAMID and AEC peacekeeping operations in Sudan  Growing new partners every day –S/CRS leads the U.S. in the International Stabilization and Peacebuilding Initiative – an informal network of governments and international organizations committed to building new capacity for joint civilian missions S/CRS works constantly with over 18 international partners and emerging counterparts to enhance interoperability and ensure cooperative mission success.

11 11 Hire 264 Identify 2000 Full Spectrum Skill Sets Standing civilian capacity that is trained, ready, and quickly deployable with the common operating picture and equipment necessary for a sustained presence in austere environments Federal U.S. government civilian agency employees who have regular ongoing job responsibilities, but are trained and available to deploy when needed. Goal Today 105 Full-Time Members 887 Stand-by Members Dec ‘ Full-Time Members 1000 Stand-by Members

12 12 Rule of Law: policing, legal administration, justice systems, and corrections programs design and management Innovative Economic Recovery: agriculture, rural development, commerce, taxes, monetary policy, and business/financial services Essential Services: public health, public infrastructure, and education and labor assessment Diplomacy/Governance: political reporting, civil administration, democracy and good governance, civil society/ media development, and security sector reform Diplomatic Security: support to U.S. Embassies in assessing and planning for security/force protection requirements in support of broader contingency and field operations Strategic Planning, Management and Operations: Assessment, planning, base set-up, operations management, and strategic communications

13 13 Rule of Law: policing, legal administration, justice systems, and corrections programs design and management Innovative Economic Recovery: agriculture, rural development, commerce, taxes, monetary policy, and business/financial services Essential Services: public health, public infrastructure, and education and labor assessment Diplomacy/Governance: political reporting, civil administration, democracy and good governance, civil society/ media development, and security sector reform Diplomatic Security: support to U.S. Embassies in assessing and planning for security/force protection requirements in support of broader contingency and field operations Strategic Planning, Management and Operations: Assessment, planning, base set-up, operations management, and strategic communications

14 14 Training for R&S Success Current Readiness Status of the Corps Active Component Training Requirements: –Civilian Response Corps-Active members are required to take a minimum of 8 weeks of training a year. –Civilian Response Corps-Standby members must take a minimum of two weeks a year. S/CRS prepares Civilian Response Corps members for deployment months before their departure -- from a rigorous training program, developed with USAID and DOD, all the way through to vaccination and visa processing right before their flight. As first responders, Active Corps members are always either preparing for deployment, deployed, or returning from deployment and incorporating their lessons learned into their continued training.

15 15 Readiness Training Pipelines CRC-Active Foundations FSI 2 Weeks Level I Planners NDU 3 Weeks Security for Non- Traditional Operating Environments DS Operational Readiness : able to respond to countries at risk of, in, or emerging from crises. 3 Weeks CRC-Standby Operational Readiness Foundations FSI 2 Weeks Operational Readiness Pre-deployment Briefing and Country Specific Briefing CDC Pre-deployment and Country Specific Briefing CDC

16 16 Creating the Muscle Memory Exercises and experiments provide Corps members with hands-on, practical experience with interagency, military, and multinational partners Exercises with geographic combatant commands integrate civilian planners with military stability operations planning - Austere Challenge (EUCOM), Judicious Response (AFRICOM), Arcade Fusion (NATO), Blue Advance (SOUTHCOM) Interagency civilian exercises prepare Corps members for deployment - Civilian Deployment Center (CDC) tabletop exercises, Department of Commerce TTX Way Forward - Continue civilian-military exercise planning, expanding into new commands - Develop interagency, civilian exercises and experiments - Exercise with international partners

17 17 Civilian Response Corps Deployment Process DAM process initiated, verified and approved Personnel processed and briefed at Civilian Deployment Center Lodging and logistics coordinated Deployable personnel paperwork finalized Deployment Authorization Memo (DAM) prepared S/CRS support requested Deployable personnel contacted Deployable personnel identified Deployed team arrives Completed 7 Days from Support Request

18 18 Deployment Readiness Managed by USAID, the Civilian Deployment Center is utilized by civilian agencies across the U.S. government.  48-hour processing timeline –Dining facilities –Physical fitness equipment –Team building facilities  Clearances and requirements –Security –Medical –Visa Processes –Travel specifications –Training  Issuing equipment –Reintroduce members to the gear

19 19 Africa: Past, Current & Potential Activities SUDAN: - Whole-of-Government Planning - Darfur Field Deployments - Technical Assistance to Embassy & Consulate - Support to S/USSES contingency planning LIBERIA: - Support to SSR Activities programming - ICAF CHAD: - Conflict Assessment - Field deployments to eastern Chad - Staffing support to Embassy N’djamena SOMALIA (HORN): programming (regional) - Interagency CRC deployments for Somalia SSR assessment UGANDA: - ICAF DRC: - ICAF assessments and programming - Interagency sectoral assessment deployments - Sectoral planning effort - SSR Liaison to MONUC CAR: - Potential planning effort INCREASED DEPLOYMENT CAPACITY 2006: 2 engagements Darfur Chad 2010: 7 engagements Chad Sudan Somalia Uganda DRC Liberia CAR

20 20 Democratic Republic of Congo  Background November 2008 Scoping Mission to Kinshasa and Goma $11.9 M in 1207 funding in FY08 and FY09; FY funding recipient Interagency Conflict Assessment of DRC in 2008  Current Initiative: Follow up to Secretary Clinton’s August 2009 trip to DRC Assemble, Coordinate, Train, Fund and Deploy 5 USG Interagency Assessment Teams: 1.Economic Governance 2.Anticorruption 3.Sexual- and Gender-based Violence 4.Security Sector Reform (SSR) 5.Food Security and Agriculture 33 individuals involved in field assessments; 12 CRC-A; 6 Federal Agencies DS Support, Kinshasa Coordinator and DC-Based Reach-back Team 2-person planning team to support MSRP integration effort  MONUC: 1 CRC-A Member embedded with MONUC to Liaise on SSR

21 21 Democratic Republic of Congo  Background November 2008 Scoping Mission to Kinshasa and Goma $11.9 M in 1207 funding in FY08 and FY09; FY funding recipient Interagency Conflict Assessment of DRC in 2008  Current Initiative: Follow up to Secretary Clinton’s August 2009 trip to DRC Assemble, Coordinate, Train, Fund and Deploy 5 USG Interagency Assessment Teams: 1.Economic Governance 2.Anticorruption 3.Sexual- and Gender-based Violence 4.Security Sector Reform (SSR) 5.Food Security and Agriculture 33 individuals involved in field assessments; 12 CRC-A; 6 Federal Agencies DS Support, Kinshasa Coordinator and DC-Based Reach-back Team 2-person planning team to support MSRP integration effort  MONUC: 1 CRC-A Member embedded with MONUC to Liaise on SSR

22 22 Concluding Remarks


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