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Copenhagen 17-18 May 2004 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Reporting of International Aviation and Marine Bunkers.

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Presentation on theme: "Copenhagen 17-18 May 2004 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Reporting of International Aviation and Marine Bunkers."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copenhagen May 2004 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Reporting of International Aviation and Marine Bunkers in the Joint IEA/UNECE/Eurostat Questionnaires Mieke Reece

2 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Background IEA data collected through Joint questionnaires with UNECE, Eurostat, and IEA IEA data collected through Joint questionnaires with UNECE, Eurostat, and IEA Oil, Coal, Gas, Electricity and Renewables Oil, Coal, Gas, Electricity and Renewables Supply data (complete balances), End-Use, Trade data by origin and destination Supply data (complete balances), End-Use, Trade data by origin and destination

3 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 International Marine Bunkers

4 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Definition International Marine Bunkers: Bunkers cover the quantities of fuels delivered to sea-going ships of all flags, including warships. Consumption by ships engaged in transport in inland and coastal waters is not included (see Inland waterways consumption). Consumption by fishing vessels should be reported in Agriculture.

5 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Survey for IEA countries International Marine Bunkers 1. What is the definition used in your country for international marine bunkers? How is the distinction made between inland waterways and coastal shipping (i.e domestic), and international marine bunkers? 2. Do you have any methodological problems? 3. Where are deliveries to the navy (military fleet) included? 4. Do you report this information to UNFCCC? If so, are data the same? If they are not the same what are the differences between data reported to IEA and UNFCCC. International aviation 5. How do you separate international fuel consumption for aviation from domestic? 6. Do you have any methodological problems 7. Where are deliveries to the military air force included? 8. Do you report this information to UNFCCC? If so, are data the same? If they are not the same what are the differences between data reported to IEA and UNFCCC.

6 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 How is the definition applied? Results of small survey for IEA countries Results of small survey for IEA countries  Definition used in Member Countries is not the same as the IEA definition !  Definition often vague or inconsistent with IEA definition  Marine bunker data mostly provided by oil companies  Main difficulties: Lack of split between deliveries for international and domestic purposes (Flag is used to determine purpose) Lack of split between deliveries for international and domestic purposes (Flag is used to determine purpose) Bunkers overestimated in order not to have to hold stocks Bunkers overestimated in order not to have to hold stocks Fishing is sometimes included Fishing is sometimes included Problems with domestic fuels delivered for international marine bunkers Problems with domestic fuels delivered for international marine bunkers Data are supply based – often oil company does not know ultimate use. Data are supply based – often oil company does not know ultimate use.

7 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Deliveries to Navy Most countries (8 out of 11) include deliveries to the navy in domestic demand Most countries (8 out of 11) include deliveries to the navy in domestic demand 2 countries are uncertain – included possibly with international marine bunkers or in statistical differences 2 countries are uncertain – included possibly with international marine bunkers or in statistical differences 1 country reports it in its export data, except deliveries for inland use. 1 country reports it in its export data, except deliveries for inland use.

8 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Report to UNFCCC? 8 respondents out of 11 do not report their data to UNFCCC. 8 respondents out of 11 do not report their data to UNFCCC. 3 respondents report to IEA and UNFCCC, sometimes through the Environmental Department in their country. 3 respondents report to IEA and UNFCCC, sometimes through the Environmental Department in their country.

9 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Summary International Marine Bunkers IEA definition is not applied IEA definition is not applied IEA definition may be too vague and imprecise IEA definition may be too vague and imprecise Definition needs to specify where deliveries to military ships should be included. Definition needs to specify where deliveries to military ships should be included. No consistent reporting to IEA and UNFCCC No consistent reporting to IEA and UNFCCC

10 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 TOTAL TRANSPORT SECTOR International Civil Aviation Domestic Air Transport Road Rail Inland Waterways Pipeline Transport Non Specified (Transport)

11 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Definition International Civil Aviation: Report all consumption of aviation fuels other than for domestic aircraft activities Domestic Air Transport: Report consumption of aviation fuels by domestic aircraft – commercial, private, agricultural, etc.; include oil used for purposes other than flying, e.g. bench testing of engines. It excludes use by airlines of motor-spirit for their road vehicles. Military use of aviation fuels should be included here.

12 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Results of Survey Split between International Civil Aviation and Domestic Aviation  In many countries, oil companies provide information on international/domestic aviation fuel supply. Foreign airlines are international, national airlines domestic  International aviation is often derived from : Total fuel supply – domestic fuel supply  Main difficulties Flag of airline determines whether it is international or domesticFlag of airline determines whether it is international or domestic No breakdown availableNo breakdown available Domestically produced fuels for international aviation are not identifiable.Domestically produced fuels for international aviation are not identifiable.

13 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Deliveries to Military Most countries (8 out of 11) include deliveries to the military in domestic demand. Some make a distinction between deliveries to military forces abroad and inland. Some distinguish between foreign and national military. Most countries (8 out of 11) include deliveries to the military in domestic demand. Some make a distinction between deliveries to military forces abroad and inland. Some distinguish between foreign and national military. 2 countries include it with international aviation 2 countries include it with international aviation 1 country does not report deliveries to foreign military. 1 country does not report deliveries to foreign military.

14 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Report to UNFCCC? Results are the same as for International Marine Bunkers 8 respondents out of 11 do not report their data to UNFCCC.8 respondents out of 11 do not report their data to UNFCCC. 3 respondents report to IEA and UNFCCC, sometimes through the Environmental Department in their country.3 respondents report to IEA and UNFCCC, sometimes through the Environmental Department in their country.

15 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Summary Domestic and international civil aviation Data are provided by oil companies based on the supplies. Oil companies not completely aware of final usage of fuel. Data are provided by oil companies based on the supplies. Oil companies not completely aware of final usage of fuel. IEA Definition needs to be more specific IEA Definition needs to be more specific Deliveries to military are mostly included in domestic consumption – sometimes in Other Sector/ Commerce Deliveries to military are mostly included in domestic consumption – sometimes in Other Sector/ Commerce No consistent reporting to IEA and UNFCCC No consistent reporting to IEA and UNFCCC

16 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Conclusions Definitions of International Marine Bunkers and Civil Aviation in Joint questionnaires need to be improved. Definitions of International Marine Bunkers and Civil Aviation in Joint questionnaires need to be improved. Clear specifications for reporting of Military Demand are necessary (see proposal). Clear specifications for reporting of Military Demand are necessary (see proposal). Member countries need to apply these definitions. Member countries need to apply these definitions. Member countries need to work more closely with their environment department providing information to UNFCCC. Member countries need to work more closely with their environment department providing information to UNFCCC.

17 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 A few considerations… Definition of International Marine Bunkers and International Civil Aviation are inconsistent: Military demand is included in Marine bunkers but not in aviation. Definition of International Marine Bunkers and International Civil Aviation are inconsistent: Military demand is included in Marine bunkers but not in aviation. Military demand should not be identifiable Military demand should not be identifiable Oil companies (who supply most of the information) need to be able to provide the information. Oil companies (who supply most of the information) need to be able to provide the information.

18 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 A proposal for discussion Foreign FlagNational CivilMilitaryCivilMilitary Intl. Same countryIntl. Same countryIntl. Same countryIntl. Same country International Marine Bunkers x x? Xx x Domestic Marine x ? x x International Civil Aviation x xxx ? X Domestic x?? x?x Questionnaire Suggestion ? Fishing (both foreign and national flag) is included in “agriculture” of the country that delivered the fuel. Ocean, coastal and inland fishing should be included. Remove “sea- going” from definition, add “international”

19 Workshop on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Aviation and Navigation Copenhagen May 2004 Remaining Questions Should Non- shipping/aviation to foreign military be reported as an export and a corresponding import by the military consuming country? Should Non- shipping/aviation to foreign military be reported as an export and a corresponding import by the military consuming country? Should Non- shipping/aviation to domestic military be included to Other Sectors/Non Specified? Should Non- shipping/aviation to domestic military be included to Other Sectors/Non Specified? Definitions will be discussed at the next ESWG in Nov 2004.


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