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Domestic Division of Labour. Evidence for greater equality The 1980s saw the emergence of ‘new man’, someone more in touch with their feminine side, happy.

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Presentation on theme: "Domestic Division of Labour. Evidence for greater equality The 1980s saw the emergence of ‘new man’, someone more in touch with their feminine side, happy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Domestic Division of Labour

2 Evidence for greater equality The 1980s saw the emergence of ‘new man’, someone more in touch with their feminine side, happy to meet the emotional and domestic needs of women. More househusbands are evident as role reversal occurs. Due to a decline in manufacturing and a rise in the service sector, women are now becoming breadwinners whilst the hegemonic male disappears and focuses on childrearing and domestic chores.

3 Gershuny (1994) Wives that worked full time did less domestic work. Wives who did not go out to work did 83% of the housework and even wives who worked part time still did 82%. Wives who worked full time did 73% of the housework. The longer the wife had been in paid employment, the more housework her husband was likely to do. Gershuny explains that social values and parental role models have changed over time.

4 Sullivan (2000) Data collected between 1975, 1987 and 1997 show a trend towards greater equality. There was an increase in the number of couples with an equal division of labour and men were participating in ‘women’s tasks’.

5 The commercialization of housework Silver and Schor (1987) believe the trend towards greater equality is due to commercialization of housework. Goods and services are mass produced and supplied by supermarkets and fast food outlets. Freezers, microwaves etc. have reduced the amount of time needed to spend on domestic labour. Women working means they can afford these goods.

6 Evidence for less equality Ferri and Smith (1996) found that increased employment of women outside the home had little impact on the division of labour. Based on a sample of 1, year old mothers and fathers, they found that the father took the main responsibility for childcare in fewer than 4% of families (even when a husband is unemployed).

7 Garrod (2005) She cites a survey conducted by Bibby Financial which claimed even professional women still do most of the housework. They spent three times as long on domestic work as men. These women are referred to as DIALLs (do it alls).

8 Criticizing feminists Women may enjoy domestic work. They underestimate the degree of power women have. Women divorce men if they are unhappy. Women make choices (Hakim).


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