Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Funding for K-12 Public Education in Oregon: M oving from Bold Rhetoric to Effective Action.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Funding for K-12 Public Education in Oregon: M oving from Bold Rhetoric to Effective Action."— Presentation transcript:

1 Funding for K-12 Public Education in Oregon: M oving from Bold Rhetoric to Effective Action

2 The Legislature’s Promise  1991—The Oregon Education Act for the 21 st Century:  “the best educated citizens in the nation by the year ”  Statutory K-12 quality goals among the most ambitious in the country  but merely aspirational

3 The People’s Demand  2000—Measure 1 (Or. Const. art. VIII, sec. 8):  Legislature “shall appropriate in each biennium a sum of money sufficient to ensure that the state’s system of public education meets” the goals established in 1991  Effect: 1991/1995 quality goals no longer aspirational

4 The Legislature’s (In)action  1992: Oregon ranked 16 th nationally in per pupil K-12 funding  2004: Oregon ranked 28th  1992: Oregon ranked 11 th nationally in per pupil funding as a percentage of citizens’ average income  2003: Oregon ranked 34th  Are tough economic times to blame?  No. Drop in real funding (measured in dollars) from $4,100 per student in 1990 to $3,300 in 1998, during period of economic prosperity

5 Results of the Legislature’s Inaction  By 2000, Oregon’s average class size of 23.9 ranked 49 th in the nation;  As of 2002, our 71% high school graduation rate ranked 32 nd;  2004 Natl. Assessment of Education Progress revealed that only approx. one- third of Oregon’s 4 th and 8 th graders are proficient in math and reading; and  Only one-half of Oregon’s 10 th graders are “meeting standards” in reading, math and writing.

6 Cost to Taxpayers of the Legislature’s Inaction  Cost of Dropouts  80% of Oregon prison inmates are dropouts, at average cost of $23,000 per inmate per year  Four times more likely to be covered by OHP  More than twice as likely to be unemployed

7

8

9 How Can We Fix It?  Quality Education Commission  non-partisan  tasked with formulating a plan to achieve statutory quality goals  conclusions based on extensive research from state and national experts  recommended specific qualitative changes based on comparison of current Oregon practices with “best practices”

10

11 How Can We Fix It? (contd.)

12

13

14 Who Will Fix It?  The Legislature?  15 years since passage of the Education Act for the 21 st Century  5 years since voters passed Measure 1 by a 2-1 margin  3 QEC Reports with dire warnings  3 reports from the Legislature itself conceding that schools aren’t measuring up  But no action

15 Who Will Fix It? (contd.)  Municipalities?  Measures 5, 47, and 50 drastically reduced ability to raise revenue  Those measures have flipped the funding burden on its head: State now has burden for more than 70% of K-12 funding  In short, municipalities are largely powerless to fix this problem

16 Who Will Fix It? (contd.)  The “Political Process”?  We’ve already tried that—voters passed Measure 1 in 2000 by a margin of 2-1  directed that the Legislature “shall appropriate” funds sufficient to satisfy K-12 quality goals  The People have spoken, but the Legislature hasn’t listened.  What options remain?

17 Who Will Fix It? (contd.)  The Courts  38 funding “adequacy” cases filed to date in other states  21 plaintiff victories  7 state victories (10 cases still pending)

18 Fundamentals of an Adequacy Challenge in Oregon  Plaintiffs  school districts and students (through their parents)  geographic diversity  Defendants  State of Oregon  legislative leaders of both Houses, on behalf of all members in their official capacities

19 Fundamentals of an Adequacy Challenge in Oregon (contd.)  Two Primary Constitutional Arguments: 1) Article VIII, section 3  requires the Legislature to “provide by law for the establishment of a uniform and general system of Common schools”  courts in many other states have recognized implicit “adequacy” requirement in similar language

20 Fundamentals of an Adequacy Challenge in Oregon (contd.) 2) Article VIII, section 8  “The Legislative Assembly shall appropriate in each biennium a sum of money sufficient to ensure that the state’s system of public education meets quality goals established by law, and publish a report that either demonstrates the appropriation is sufficient, or identifies the reasons for the insufficiency...”  “And” doesn’t mean “or”!

21 Next Steps  Oregon School Funding Defense Foundation  Board includes Paul Kelly (Chair), Art Johnson (Vice Chair), Justice Betty Roberts, Bruce Samson, Bill Deatherage, Dennis Karnopp, Marva Fabian  Executive Director is Kathryn Firestone  Raising funds from a variety of sources

22 You can help! The Oregon School Funding Defense Foundation is committed to raising the necessary funds to see the lawsuit all the way through Oregon's Court system. Our pledge to the plaintiffs is that they will incur minimal costs - related only to staff time for discovery and documentation and travel for court appearances. The Oregon School Funding Defense Foundation is committed to raising the necessary funds to see the lawsuit all the way through Oregon's Court system. Our pledge to the plaintiffs is that they will incur minimal costs - related only to staff time for discovery and documentation and travel for court appearances. OSFDF is a an Oregon Non-profit Corporation and we have applied for our 501(c)(3). Checks can be sent to OSFDF, c/o Paul Kelly, Jr., 121 SW Morrison Street, 11th Floor, Portland, Oregon Your donations may be tax-deductible as permitted by law and will be spent solely in support of the adequacy litigation - our only project. We believe that every Oregonian benefits from a high-quality, adequately funded school system and we need your help. OSFDF is a an Oregon Non-profit Corporation and we have applied for our 501(c)(3). Checks can be sent to OSFDF, c/o Paul Kelly, Jr., 121 SW Morrison Street, 11th Floor, Portland, Oregon Your donations may be tax-deductible as permitted by law and will be spent solely in support of the adequacy litigation - our only project. We believe that every Oregonian benefits from a high-quality, adequately funded school system and we need your help. Please, send a check today. Thank you! Please, send a check today. Thank you!


Download ppt "Funding for K-12 Public Education in Oregon: M oving from Bold Rhetoric to Effective Action."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google