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Chapter 11: Peers, Play, and Popularity Popularity By Kati Tumaneng (for Drs. Cook and Cook)

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 11: Peers, Play, and Popularity Popularity By Kati Tumaneng (for Drs. Cook and Cook)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 11: Peers, Play, and Popularity Popularity By Kati Tumaneng (for Drs. Cook and Cook)

2 Popular and Unpopular Children Peer nomination technique – Polling technique used to identify categories of popular and unpopular children. Peer Nomination Categories

3 Categories of Popular and Unpopular Children Popular children – Children whom a large number of peers have chosen as classmates they “like best.” Friendly, cooperative, sociable, and sensitive to the needs of others (Rubin et al., 1998). Interact with others, are helpful, and show good leadership skills. Good communication skills. Easy and nondisruptive manner when joining activities or new groups (Dodge, Pettit, McClaskey, & Brown, 1986; Putallaz, 1983).

4 Categories of Popular and Unpopular Children Rejected children – Children who are actively disliked; a large number of peers have chosen them as classmates they “like least.” Rejected-aggressive (50%) – Physically aggressive and verbally abusive (French, 1988; Rubin et al., 1998) Relational aggression – Withdrawing friendship or otherwise disrupting or threatening social relationships as a way to hurt other people. Girls more likely to use this. Rejected-withdrawn (20%) – Withdrawn and timid. Remaining children fall between the subtypes. Aggression and Peer Rejection:

5 Categories of Popular and Unpopular Children Controversial children – Children who receive large numbers of both “like best” and “like least” nominations. Average children – Children who receive moderate numbers of both “like best” and “like least” nominations. Neglected children – Children who have very few peers who like them best or least. Social Growth in Children:

6 A Social Cognition Model of Peer Relations Social cognition model – A model that explains how different children perceive, interpret, and respond to information in social settings (Crick & Dodge, 1994; Dodge, 1986). 1. Perceive the information 2. Interpret the information 3. Consider potential responses and enact one

7 A Social Cognition Model of Peer Relations Popular children tend to have positive bias (Rubin et al., 1998). Rejected children tend to have negative bias. Positive and negative patterns of social cognition may begin with infant temperament and attachment relationships involved (Rubin et al. 1998). Preventing Another Columbine:

8 Consequences of Peer Rejection Rejected children are 7 times more likely to fail a grade in school and nearly 4 times more likely to drop out of school before 10 th grade (Kupersmidt & Coie, 1990; Ollendick et al., 1992). Peer relations are predictive of mental health problems (Mueller & Silverman, 1989). Rejection linked with violence, delinquency, isolation, and loneliness. School psychologists, counselors, and other professionals help rejected and neglected children develop the social skill they need.

9 Chart on Slide 2: from Cook, J. L., & Cook, G. (2005). Child development: Principles and perspectives (1st ed.) (p. 451). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Picture on Slide 4: from Cook, J. L., & Cook, G. (2005). Child development: Principles and perspectives (1st ed.) (p. 454). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. All other images retrieved from Microsoft PowerPoint Clip Art.


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