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Chapter 3 The Quest for Evidence: Getting Started.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 3 The Quest for Evidence: Getting Started."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 3 The Quest for Evidence: Getting Started

2 Objectives Formulate clinical questions that are: –Derived from the patient/client’s problem(s) –Specific –Reasonable –Relevant Use appropriate search engines to find best available evidence to answer the question

3 Patient Scenario 65-year-old male reports 2 month history of shoulder pain and difficulty reaching over head after his dog tried to run after a cat and yanked hard on his leash Self-referred (direct access)

4 What do you want to know?

5 Types of Questions Background –Normal physiology or behavior –Pathophysiology –Basic patient diagnostic and treatment information Foreground –Selection and interpretation of diagnostic tests or clinical measures –Prediction of specific patient prognoses –Comparative risks and benefits of various treatment strategies –Potential outcomes and their measurement

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7 Elements of a good question Patient Diagnostic test or measure, prognostic indicator, intervention, clinical predication rule, outcome, or self-report outcome measure (Comparison…if available) Consequence (what you want to achieve by using the test, measure, prognostic factor, intervention, clinical prediction rule, outcome or self-report outcome measure)

8 Example: Diagnostic Test Question Simple: Which is the most accurate special test to use to rule in a rotator cuff tear in a 65 year- old-male with shoulder pain? Comparative: Is the Neer’s Test more accurate than the Hawkin’s Test for ruling in a rotator cuff tear in a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain?

9 Example: Clinical Measure Question Simple: Is a manual muscle test a reliable and valid measure of shoulder girdle strength in a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain? Comparative: Is a manual muscle test as reliable and valid as a hand held dynamometer for measuring shoulder girdle strength in a 65- year-old male with shoulder pain?

10 Example: Prognosis Question Simple: Does hand dominance predict return to function in a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain? Comparative: Is hand dominance a more accurate predictor of return to function than duration of symptoms in a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain?

11 Example: Intervention Question Simple: Is joint mobilization effective in restoring functional use of the UE in a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain? Comparative: Is joint mobilization plus exercise more effective than exercise alone in restoring functional use of the UE in a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain?

12 Example: Clinical Prediction Rule Question Simple: Can a clinical prediction rule predict the outcome in a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain whose first physical therapy consultation occurred 6 weeks prior? Comparative: Is a clinical prediction rule more accurate for predicting outcome at 6 weeks or 6 months in a 65- year-old male who seeks an initial physical therapy consultation for shoulder pain?

13 Example: Outcomes Question Simple: Will a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain achieve a meaningful change in outcome with modalities? Comparative: Will a 65-year-old male with shoulder pain achieve a meaningful change in outcome with modalities or with therapeutic exercise?

14 Example: Self-Report Outcomes Measure Question Simple: Is the DASH (Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) scale sensitive to change in function after physical therapy for a 65-year- old male with shoulder pain? Comparative: Which scale is more sensitive to change in function after physical therapy in a 65- year-old male with shoulder pain: the DASH or the SPADI (Shoulder Pain & Disability Index)?

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16 Finding the Evidence General plan of attack –Prioritize type of study that can give you the most information –Determine which database will be most useful or efficient for your search –Identify search terms and their synonyms to use in the search

17 Finding the Evidence General plan of attack –Use the search engine features to expand or collapse your search –Be prepared to reformulate your question or work with evidence that is indirectly related to your question –Aim for the highest quality articles you can find

18 Sources of Evidence Primary –Original research reports –Found in: Peer reviewed journals Proceedings from professional meetings Theses and dissertations Websites Secondary –Summary reviews of works of other researchers –Found in: Systematic and narrative reviews in peer-reviewed journals Text books Practice guidelines Websites

19 Relevant Search Engines General Medical (health care) Databases –PubMed –CINAHL –Cochrane Library Physical Therapy Specific Databases –PEDro –Hooked on Evidence

20 PubMed Produced by the US National Library of Medicine “Free” to the public Online version of Index Medicus Links may be included to online journals Comprehensive, but…not all health care journals are indexed, especially in allied health professions

21 PubMed – Key Features Clinical Queries –Clinical studies by category –Find systematic reviews MeSH Database –Synonyms (keywords) to use for your searches –Tutorials Comprehensive Limits Option Search History Tracking “My NCBI” Alert, Storage and Retrieval Option

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32 Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) Primary search engine for allied health literature, especially from journals not indexed by PubMed Links may be included to online journals Subscription fee

33 CINAHL – Key Features Easy search feature CINAHL headings mapping function Some different limits options not included in PubMed Search history tracking

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37 Cochrane Library International collaboration Produces systematic reviews and meta-analyses of individual studies Rigorous search, selection and quality assessment methodology Updated regularly Abstracts are free Subscription fee for full reviews

38 Cochrane Library – Key Features Easy search feature MeSH terms feature Full review provided Only controlled trials reviewed for intervention questions

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41 PEDro Physiotherapy Evidence Database Free access Bibliographic details and abstracts of randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and evidence- based clinical practice guidelines in physiotherapy. Most trials in the database have been rated for quality

42 PEDro – Key Features PT relevant drop down menus for searching –Type of therapy –Body part –Subdiscipline –Research method

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46 Hooked on Evidence APTA database and search engine regarding physical therapy interventions Membership or subscription required Studies of human subjects in English language peer-reviewed journals with at least 1 PT intervention included Clinical scenarios to which evidence in the database is linked

47 Hooked on Evidence – Key Features Information is abstracted from articles that addresses key concerns about research design and results Clinical scenarios to which evidence in the database is linked Articles added to the database by APTA members so some practice areas or interventions may not be well represented

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51 Which articles to choose? Relevance to the question posed Consistency with contemporary practice Ranking on evidence hierarchy Peer-reviewed Credentials of authors, editors or reviewers Disclosure of funding sources or conflicts of interest


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